White Collar

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Army Officer Says Gov't Smeared Him With False Claims

    A former major general in the U.S. Army on Tuesday sued the U.S. Department of Defense and others, alleging that the government wrongly recorded him as having assaulted his partner, despite her recanting the allegations and admitting they were a ploy to seek attention.

  • April 02, 2024

    Security Guard Co. Settles DOJ's Immigration Bias Probe

    Nationwide security guard company Securitas Security Services USA Inc. has agreed to pay $175,000 to resolve investigations into its hiring practices that the U.S. Department of Justice was conducting after it received a complaint that the firm was discriminating against non-U.S. citizens, the government announced Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    JFK Taxi Dispatchers Charged With Taking Bribes For Rides

    Nine taxi dispatchers at John F. Kennedy International Airport have been charged with accepting cash bribes in exchange for allowing drivers to skip the line to pick up passengers, the Queens district attorney has announced.

  • April 02, 2024

    Swiss Banker Avoids Prison For $60M Tax Evasion Conspiracy

    A Manhattan federal judge allowed a Swiss finance pro to avoid prison Tuesday for facilitating a tax evasion scheme that helped wealthy Americans hide $60 million from the IRS, saying the defendant is less culpable than alleged co-conspirators.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Seek Use Of 'Intertwined' Evidence In NC Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors have asked a North Carolina district court to permit tangential evidence in a tax fraud trial, saying that the evidence is "inextricably intertwined with the charged conduct" of two St. Louis attorneys and a North Carolina insurance agent.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Back The Retooled Bribery Case Against Sen. Menendez

    Federal prosecutors on Monday hit back at a "meritless" bid by Sen. Robert Menendez and his wife and business associates to ditch a superseding indictment for an elaborate bribery scheme, citing a plenitude of case law in an effort to knock down the defendants' assertions the retooled charges are "duplicitous" and lodged in the wrong court.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Seek 4 Years For Ex-Amazon Coder In Novel Crypto Case

    Prosecutors have told a Manhattan federal judge that a former Amazon coder convicted on charges of hacking a "smart contract" should be sentenced to at least four years in prison in order to send a message to other would-be crypto fraudsters.

  • April 02, 2024

    Prosecutors Call Indicted Exec's Misconduct Claims 'Flawed'

    Prosecutors have asked a California federal judge to reject a bid for sanctions by a former healthcare CEO indicted on novel insider trading charges, arguing that his claims related to a separate case are based on "flawed grounds."

  • April 02, 2024

    Boston Bomber Case Offers Clues For Trump Jury Selection

    A recent ruling that may undo the Boston Marathon bomber's death sentence holds lessons for Donald Trump's upcoming trials, where attorneys will need to make prospective jurors comfortable enough to admit bias before they're picked — and potentially avoid years of appellate fights.

  • April 02, 2024

    Feds Seek Leniency For UK Billionaire Lewis In Trading Case

    Prosecutors have told a Manhattan federal judge that 87-year-old British billionaire Joe Lewis should serve less than 18 months in prison after he pled guilty to insider trading, citing his age and health and arguing he "has otherwise lived a law-abiding life."

  • April 02, 2024

    Man Gets 14 Months For Threatening To Kill Justice Roberts

    A Florida man who admitted to calling U.S. Supreme Court Chief Justice John Roberts' chambers and leaving a voicemail in which he twice threatened to kill the justice has been sentenced to 14 months in federal prison. 

  • April 01, 2024

    Trump Posts $175M Bond, Pausing $465M Fraud Judgment

    Donald Trump on Monday posted a $175 million bond, ducking, for now, enforcement of a nearly $465 million civil fraud judgment against him and his businesses in the New York attorney general's case accusing them of defrauding banks and insurers.

  • April 01, 2024

    Autonomy Paid Whistleblower $750K Over Firing, Jury Told

    Autonomy's former U.S. chief financial officer testified Monday in the California criminal fraud trial of ex-CEO Michael Lynch that he was fired after blowing the whistle to British regulators about accounting irregularities, and revealed that Autonomy later paid him $750,000 to resolve his wrongful termination claims.

  • April 01, 2024

    Trump's Gag Order Expands Over 'Attacks' On Judge's Family

    Donald Trump has a constitutional right to respond to alleged political attacks, but he does not have a right to attack family members of the state judge overseeing his criminal case in New York, the judge ruled late Monday, expanding the former president's gag order in his hush money case.

  • April 01, 2024

    Inotiv Can't Toss Investor Suit Over Feds' 'Puppy Mill' Probe

    Medical research services provider Inotiv Inc. must face a proposed investor class action accusing it of failing to disclose that subsidiaries it acquired had come under investigations by the U.S. Department of Justice for animal welfare and smuggling violations, an Indiana federal judge ruled while lamenting the "appalling" mistreatment of beagles that investigators had found.

  • April 01, 2024

    RICO Claims Fail In Suit Against Developer, Judge Says

    A Texas federal judge on Monday dismissed a lawsuit brought by real estate entities associated with a Dallas developer who accused the founders of Megatel Homes LLC of racketeering, saying that the lawsuit didn't plausibly state that the defendants had engaged in any unlawful racketeering activity.

  • April 01, 2024

    Nat'l Security Info Ordered Sealed In $12M Somali Fraud Case

    A Maryland federal judge has ordered protocols to seal confidential State Department materials amid the government's criminal fraud case charging a Maryland lawyer with misappropriating more than $12 million in Somali state assets.

  • April 01, 2024

    DC Circ. Rejects Navarro's Presidential Records Appeal

    The D.C. Circuit on Monday ruled that the federal government can use a 1978 law governing the preservation of presidential records to force former Trump adviser Peter Navarro to turn over emails from his time at the White House.

  • April 01, 2024

    Bankrupt Water Co. Investors Say CEO Stole Millions

    Investors of now-defunct water purification company Water Now said its former CEO ran the business into the ground while enriching himself, telling a Texas federal court Friday that the executive used the company to take out significant loans and line his own pockets.

  • April 01, 2024

    AIG Unit Can't Toss Conn. Utility's $3M Defense Cost Bid

    An AIG unit can't escape the Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative's third-party suit seeking to recoup $3 million in legal expenses, a Connecticut federal court ruled, saying the cooperative has standing to pursue coverage on behalf of its former CEO who was convicted of stealing public funds.

  • April 01, 2024

    Adviser Gets 4 Years For Fraud, Filing False Tax Returns

    An Indiana investment adviser was sentenced to four years in prison and ordered to pay $6.4 million in restitution for stealing $4.7 million from a client and filing false returns, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • April 01, 2024

    Feds Back Guilty Verdict After Software Execs' Tax Fraud Trial

    Federal prosecutors on Monday defended a jury verdict finding two former software executives in North Carolina guilty of failing to pay employment taxes, saying sufficient evidence supported their convictions.

  • April 01, 2024

    Spinning For Terraform Was Tough, Crypto Rep Tells Jury

    A California man who worked for Terraform Labs and creator Do Kwon told a Manhattan federal jury Monday that doing public relations for the now-bankrupt cryptocurrency startup accused of fraud left him "angry" and confused as he tried to be transparent.

  • April 01, 2024

    Ex-Fed. Prosecutor, Tech Co. GC Joins Boies Schiller In Calif.

    Boies Schiller Flexner LLP is bolstering its West Coast litigation team, announcing Monday it has brought on a former federal prosecutor, who most recently worked at home rental platform Bungalow, as a partner in its San Francisco and Los Angeles offices.

  • April 01, 2024

    Murdaugh Gets 40 Years For Financial Crimes In Fed. Court

    Alex Murdaugh, the disgraced former South Carolina lawyer serving a life sentence for murder, was hit with a concurrent 40-year prison term in federal court Monday after pleading guilty to stealing at least $9 million from clients.

Expert Analysis

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • Freight Forwarders And Common Carriers: Know Your Cargo

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    Freight forwarders and other nonprincipal parties involved in global cargo movement should follow the guidance in the multi-agency know-your-cargo compliance note to avoid enforcement actions should they fail to spot evasive tactics used in supply chains to circumvent U.S. sanctions and export controls, say attorneys at Venable.

  • Takeaways From 9th Circ. Nix Of Ex-GOP Rep.'s Conviction

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    The Ninth Circuit recently reversed the conviction of former Rep. Jeff Fortenberry, R-Neb., for lying to the FBI, showing that the court will rein in aggressive attempts by the government to expand the reach of criminal prosecutions — and deepening a circuit split on an important venue issue, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • A Closer Look At Novel Jury Instruction In Forex Rigging Case

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    After the recent commodities fraud conviction of a U.K.-based hedge fund executive in U.S. v. Phillips, post-trial briefing has focused on whether the New York federal court’s jury instruction incorrectly defined the requisite level of intent, which should inform defense counsel in future open market manipulation cases, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

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    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.

  • Skirting Anti-Kickback Causation Standard Amid Circuit Split

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    Amid the federal circuit court split over the causation standard applicable to False Claims Act cases involving Anti-Kickback Statute violations, which the First Circuit will soon consider in U.S. v. Regeneron, litigators aiming to circumvent the heightened standard should contemplate certain strategies, say Matthew Modafferi and Terence Park at Frier Levitt.

  • A Look Into How Jurors Reach High Damages Awards

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    In the wake of several large jury awards, Richard Gabriel and Emily Shaw at Decision Analysis shed light on challenges that jurors have in deciding them, the nonevidentiary and extra-legal methods they use to do so, and new research about the themes and jury characteristics of high-damages jurors.

  • What New Calif. Strike Force Means For White Collar Crimes

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    The recently announced Central District of California strike force targeting complex corporate and securities fraud — following the Northern District of California's model — combines experienced prosecutorial leadership and partnerships with federal agencies like the IRS and FBI, and could result in an uptick in the number of cases and speed of proceedings, say attorneys at MoFo.

  • Managing Competing Priorities In Witness Preparation

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    There’s often a divide between what attorneys and witnesses want out of the deposition process, but litigation teams can use several strategies to resolve this tension and help witnesses be more comfortable with the difficult conditions of testifying, say Ava Hernández and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Understanding And Working With The Millennials On Your Jury

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    Every trial attorney will be facing a greater proportion of millennials on their jury, as they now comprise the largest generation in the U.S., and winning them over requires an understanding of their views on politics, corporations and damages, says Clint Townson at Townson Litigation Consulting.

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Opinion

    White Collar Plea Deals Are Rarely 'Knowing' And 'Voluntary'

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    Because prosecutors are not required to disclose exculpatory evidence during plea negotiations, white collar defendants often enter into plea deals that don’t meet the U.S. Supreme Court’s “knowing” and “voluntary” standard for trials — but individual courts and solutions judges could rectify the issue, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

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