Trials

  • April 16, 2024

    Ga. Sheriff's Abuse Conviction Should Stand, 11th Circ. Hints

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Tuesday appeared wary of dismissing the criminal conviction of Victor Hill, a former Georgia sheriff who was convicted in 2022 of violating the civil rights of detainees by strapping them to a chair for hours at a time.

  • April 16, 2024

    AT&T Unit Urges Justices To Weigh In On FCC E-Rate Saga

    An AT&T subsidiary is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to rule on whether reimbursement requests for the Federal Communications Commission's E-rate program for schools and libraries are "claims" under the False Claims Act, part of a whistleblower suit accusing the company of overcharging public schools and libraries.

  • April 16, 2024

    NJ Hospital GC Emails Doom $24M Verdict For Surgeons

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Tuesday vacated a $24.3 million award to a group of neurosurgeons on their claim that a hospital didn't operate in good faith, finding the trial court's admission of emails from the hospital's general counsel and remarks made during closing arguments deprived the hospital of a fair trial.

  • April 16, 2024

    Meet The Atty For An Ex-Union Leader Facing His 3rd Trial

    The only thing standing between ex-Philly union leader John Dougherty and a third conviction is attorney Greg Pagano, and he feels confident going into the next trial that things will be different. 

  • April 16, 2024

    BigLaw Attys Among First 7 Jurors Picked In Trump's NY Trial

    Two BigLaw attorneys on Tuesday were among seven people sworn in as jurors in Donald Trump's Manhattan hush money trial, which could proceed to opening statements as soon as Monday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Focus On Prosecutor Will Set Ga. Trump Jury Questions Apart

    The jury questionnaire currently before hundreds of Manhattan residents in Donald Trump's first criminal trial will serve as a partial blueprint for his upcoming election interference case in Georgia, experts told Law360, with at least one significant difference: a sharp focus on the Fulton County case's high-profile, controversial prosecutor.

  • April 16, 2024

    Moving Co. Execs Found Guilty In $7.7M Payroll Tax Scheme

    The former president of a moving company and its head bookkeeper conspired to evade more than $7.7 million in federal payroll taxes, a New York federal jury has found.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ga. Shouldn't 'Go Back' On Absentee Voter Rules, Judge Told

    Back in court for its third election-related trial of 2024, the state of Georgia urged a federal judge Monday morning not to strike down increased regulations on the state's absentee ballot application process enacted as part of the state's controversial 2021 election law.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Testifies To Handshake Deals, Backdating

    Autonomy's former U.S. head of sales testified for the prosecution Monday in the criminal fraud trial of founder Michael Lynch, saying he boosted sales figures via "quid pro quo" handshake deals with customers, created pretextual emails to cover his tracks and even backdated a deal to meet revenue targets.

  • April 15, 2024

    Law Firm Shooting Victim Was 'In Constant Fear,' Family Says

    A woman who was killed in a shooting that also took the life of her husband, prominent Las Vegas personal injury lawyer Dennis Prince, "lived in constant fear for her safety" as she battled her ex-husband for custody of their two young children, her parents said Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Structured Deposits Recalled In Ex-Ecuadorian Official's Trial

    A bookkeeper testified Monday in Miami federal court that he conducted a series of structured deposits and other suspicious transactions while working at a tile company owned by the son of Ecuador's former comptroller general, who's accused of laundering millions of dollars in bribes from Brazilian conglomerate Odebrecht SA.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tax Attys, Broker Peddled 'Financial Fantasy,' NC Jury Told

    A North Carolina federal jury on Monday heard a series of secret recordings at the start of a tax fraud trial in which an insurance agent and a St. Louis attorney unwittingly pitched an undercover IRS agent on a way to decrease taxable income — or what the government characterized as a "financial fantasy."

  • April 15, 2024

    Trump Tells Justices Impeachment Required For Prosecution

    Former President Donald Trump told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that the "inevitably and unavoidably" political nature of prosecuting a former president requires input from Congress, arguing the U.S. Constitution's framers carefully wrote the impeachment clause to act as an initial hurdle for criminal prosecutions.

  • April 15, 2024

    Expert's Disney Trip Is No Reason To Delay Trial, Court Told

    A technical expert's $14,000 vacation to Disney World isn't the kind of circumstance that ought to delay a patent trial in which he's due to appear in on behalf of a Taiwanese monitor maker, a federal court in Waco, Texas, has been told.

  • April 15, 2024

    Justices Wary Of Strict Limit On Malicious Prosecution Cases

    Several U.S. Supreme Court justices appeared open Monday to the idea that a charge made without probable cause can be grounds for a malicious prosecution civil suit even if another charge with valid probable cause accompanied it, but without a clear consensus on a precise boundary.

  • April 15, 2024

    Giuliani Can't Dodge $148M Defamation Verdict, Judge Says

    A D.C. federal judge on Monday refused to disturb a jury verdict directing Rudy Giuliani to pay $148 million to two Georgia election workers whom he falsely accused of committing ballot fraud in the 2020 presidential election, saying the former New York City mayor and Trump ally hasn't offered any reason to modify the jurors' decision or hold a new trial.

  • April 15, 2024

    Hytera Still Not Doing All It Can To Stop Fine, Motorola Says

    Hytera Communications has continued to drag its feet as it tries to lift the sanctions against it for participating in Chinese litigation against a court order, Motorola Solutions told the Seventh Circuit, arguing that a district court judge's daily status hearings ensure Hytera is being compelled to comply without being punished.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tennis Coach Awarded $2.9M For Defamation In Title IX Suit

    A Quincy University tennis coach has been awarded $2.9 million at the close of a jury trial in Illinois federal court on his counterclaims that a former star recruit spread rumors that he had had sexual relations with a female student tennis player.

  • April 15, 2024

    Drivers Can't Avoid Uber's 'Road Not Taken' Position

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled that the luxury car drivers who accused Uber Technologies Inc. of misclassifying them as independent contractors must respond to the company's renewed post-trial win bid, rejecting the drivers' argument that it was too long and filed too late.

  • April 15, 2024

    Security Co. Faces Trial Over Poorly Trained Guards In Kabul

    Allegations that an international security company defrauded the U.S. government by skimping mandatory refresher training for guards protecting diplomatic sites in Afghanistan will be heard at trial after a Georgia federal judge refused to throw out a former supervisor's whistleblower suit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Apple Defends Anti-Steering Rule Compliance In Epic Case

    Apple told a California federal court it has fully complied with an order barring anti-steering rules in its App Store and said complaints from Epic Games, Microsoft and others about its compliance are just efforts by the companies to pad their own profits.

  • April 15, 2024

    Feds Seek Prison For Group That Invaded Abortion Clinic

    Prosecutors are seeking prison sentences for six anti-abortion activists convicted of storming a Washington, D.C., abortion clinic, including a six-year term for the alleged "criminal mastermind" behind this and other blockades.

  • April 15, 2024

    Prosecutor Says Trump Can't Keep Punting Docs Deadlines

    The special counsel prosecuting former President Donald Trump over the alleged mishandling of classified documents at his Mar-a-Lago estate has asked a Florida federal judge to deny Trump's request for another delay, arguing Trump should not be able to use a trial against him in New York to further delay the proceeding.

  • April 15, 2024

    'Rust' Armorer Gets 18 Mos. For On-Set Shooting Death

    A New Mexico judge gave "Rust" film armorer Hannah Gutierrez-Reed the maximum 18-month prison sentence Monday for involuntary manslaughter in the fatal shooting of a cinematographer on the set of the low-budget Western starring actor-producer Alec Baldwin, who faces trial on the same charge this summer.

  • April 15, 2024

    Sotomayor, Jackson Dissent As Court Rejects Capital Cases

    In a pair of dissents, Justices Ketanji Brown Jackson and Sonia Sotomayor on Monday broke with a majority of their colleagues on the U.S. Supreme Court who declined to hear two death penalty cases.

Expert Analysis

  • 5 Ways To Hone Deposition Skills And Improve Results

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Depositions must never be taken for granted in the preparations needed to win a dispositive motion or a trial, and five best practices, including knowing when to hire a videographer, can significantly improve outcomes, says James Argionis at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Series

    Skiing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    A lifetime of skiing has helped me develop important professional skills, and taught me that embracing challenges with a spirit of adventure can allow lawyers to push boundaries, expand their capabilities and ultimately excel in their careers, says Andrea Przybysz at Tucker Ellis.

  • Navigating Trade Secret Litigation In A High-Stakes Landscape

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    Recent eye-popping verdicts are becoming increasingly common in trade secret litigation — but employers can take several proactive steps to protect proprietary information and defend against misappropriation accusations in order to avoid becoming the next headline, say Jessica Mason and Jack FitzGerald at Foley & Lardner.

  • Think Like A Lawyer: Forget Everything You Know About IRAC

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    The mode of legal reasoning most students learn in law school, often called “Issue, Rule, Application, Conclusion,” or IRAC, erroneously frames analysis as a separate, discrete step, resulting in disorganized briefs and untold obfuscation — but the fix is pretty simple, says Luke Andrews at Poole Huffman.

  • Zero-Point Offender Eligibility May Hinge On Meaning Of 'And'

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    Some white collar defendants’ eligibility for the new zero-point offender sentencing adjustment comes down to whether the word “and” really means “and” — a question the U.S. Supreme Court is set to resolve in its upcoming Pulsifer v. U.S. decision, which could affect thousands of incarcerated people, say Brandon McCarthy and Nikita Yogeshwarun at Katten.

  • Complying With Enforcers' Ephemeral Messaging Guidance

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    Given federal antitrust enforcers’ recently issued guidance on ephemeral messaging applications, organizations must take a proactive approach to preserving short-lived communications — or risk criminal obstruction charges and civil discovery sanctions, say attorneys at Manatt.

  • How Firms Can Ensure Associate Gender Parity Lasts

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    Among associates, women now outnumber men for the first time, but progress toward gender equality at the top of the legal profession remains glacially slow, and firms must implement time-tested solutions to ensure associates’ gender parity lasts throughout their careers, say Kelly Culhane and Nicole Joseph at Culhane Meadows.

  • How Echoing Techniques Can Derail Witnesses At Deposition

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    Before depositions, defense attorneys must prepare witnesses to recognize covert echoing techniques that may be used by opposing counsel to lower their defenses and elicit sensitive information — potentially leading to nuclear settlements and verdicts, say Bill Kanasky and Steve Wood at Courtroom Sciences.

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    Compassionate Release Grants Needed Now More Than Ever

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    After the U.S. Sentencing Commission's recent expansion of the criteria for determining compassionate release eligibility, courts should grant such motions more frequently in light of the inherently dangerous conditions presented by increasingly understaffed and overpopulated federal prisons, say Alan Ellis and Mark Allenbaugh at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • Mitigating Whistleblower Risks After High Court UBS Ruling

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    While it is always good practice for companies to periodically review whistleblower trainings, policies and procedures, the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent whistleblower-friendly ruling in Murray v. UBS Securities helps demonstrate their importance in reducing litigation risk, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Perspectives

    Justices' Double Jeopardy Ruling Preserves Acquittal Sanctity

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s unanimous decision last week in McElrath v. Georgia, barring the state from retrying a man acquitted of murder after a so-called repugnant verdict, is significant in the tangled web of double jeopardy jurisprudence for its brief and unequivocal protection of an acquittal’s finality, says Lissa Griffin at Pace Law School.

  • High Court Forfeiture Case Again Pits Text Against Purpose

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    In oral arguments Tuesday in McIntosh v. U.S., the U.S. Supreme Court will consider whether a federal court can impose asset forfeiture on a defendant even if it doesn’t comply with timing rules, which may affect the broader interpretation of procedural deadlines — and tees up the latest battle between textualism and purposivism, say Anden Chow and Christian Bale at MoloLamken.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

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