Texas

  • May 01, 2024

    REvil Hacker Gets 13-Year Term In $700M Ransomware Spree

    A Ukrainian national behind the massive Sodinokibi ransomware attacks demanding more than $700 million in payments from several businesses, including multinational IT company Kaseya in 2021, was sentenced to nearly 13 years and seven months in prison Wednesday in Texas federal court, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Use Of US Law In Maritime Malaria Dispute

    The Fifth Circuit on Wednesday overturned an order permitting an Indian man to invoke U.S. law in his lawsuit accusing a Singaporean ship management company of negligence after he contracted malaria during a trip to Gabon while working aboard a Liberian-flagged cargo ship.

  • May 01, 2024

    'Irked' Albright Refuses To Send IP Suit Against Apple To Calif.

    U.S. District Judge Alan Albright of the Western District of Texas has refused to send a suit accusing Apple Inc. of infringing patents on vibration technology to California, with the judge saying that some of the tech giant's arguments were "irksome."

  • May 01, 2024

    Texas 'Gave Away The Game' In ATF Suit, 5th Circ. Judge Says

    A Fifth Circuit judge told Texas it "just gave away the game" by stating that the application for obtaining a firearm suppressor counts as the injury, asking how the state could contend it had experienced such an injury without having applied for a license to own a suppressor during oral arguments Wednesday in a suit challenging federal firearm regulations.

  • May 01, 2024

    Chamber Must Name Cos. It Reps In Noncompete Suit, FTC Says

    The Federal Trade Commission has asked a Texas federal judge to limit the U.S. Chamber of Commerce to representing only named members in its challenge to the agency's pending noncompetes ban, arguing the trade group can't hide behind the First Amendment to represent "millions of undisclosed members."

  • May 01, 2024

    Median Patent Damages Awards Are Shrinking

    A New York accounting firm that provides damages experts for intellectual property cases has found in a new study that median damages awards in patent cases have declined over the last 15 years.

  • May 01, 2024

    Judge Finds Engineering Co. Had No Duty In Goya Death Case

    A Texas federal judge has thrown out claims against Zachry Engineering Inc. in a suit by the family of a Goya Foods Inc. worker who died when his forklift hit a pipe and caused him to be sprayed with nearly boiling beans, saying the engineering company had no say in the height of the pipe and was not responsible for making sure it wasn't a hazard.

  • May 01, 2024

    Settlement Ends Texas Man's Injury Suit Against Ga. Winery

    A Texas man and Georgia winery have reached a settlement ending the man's suit alleging he was injured during a 2021 visit when a patio umbrella came out of its stand, fell on him and injured his hands, fingers, thumb and chest.

  • May 01, 2024

    DOL Announces $6.5M For Seasonal Farmworker Housing

    The U.S. Department of Labor on Wednesday said it will make $6.5 million in grants available to organizations working to improve housing conditions for seasonal and migrant farmworkers and their dependents.

  • May 01, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Revives WDTX Patent Suit Tossed Over Standing

    The Federal Circuit on Wednesday reversed a decision by Western District of Texas Judge Alan Albright that a company suing Zebra Technologies Corp. for patent infringement lacked constitutional standing, holding instead that the plaintiff retained patent rights under a loan agreement.

  • May 01, 2024

    Colonial Pipeline Says Contractor Bungled $22M Ga. Project

    A contractor hired to build a $22.4 million fuel terminal for Colonial Pipeline Co. in Georgia owes the company at least $600,000 because of missed deadlines, shoddy workmanship and failing to pay its subcontractors, a new suit alleges.

  • May 01, 2024

    Ex-Cybersecurity Firm CEO Settles SEC Fraud Claims

    A former executive for a cybersecurity firm has agreed to settle regulators' allegations that he lied to investors about the firm's success in selling a new product and that he fabricated aspects of his background and experience, according to filings in Texas federal court.

  • May 01, 2024

    Hotel Chains Hit With Algorithmic Pricing Collusion Suit

    A group of hotel-goers has hit six major hotel chains with a proposed class action, alleging that the companies used a shared pricing algorithm to fix and raise hotel prices nationwide.

  • May 01, 2024

    Eiger Gets Deal With Merck Over $46M Rare-Disease Drug Sale

    Bankrupt Eiger BioPharmaceuticals Inc. told a Texas federal judge Wednesday it had struck a tentative agreement with drug company Merck & Co. over licensing rights to a rare-disease drug that it is selling for $46.1 million.

  • May 01, 2024

    Globe Life Hid Toxic Culture And Policy Fraud, Investors Say

    Life insurance company Globe Life Inc. has been hit with a proposed class action alleging investors were damaged when a short-seller report revealed that the company had been ignoring rampant sexual harassment among its employees and participating in fraudulent underwriting practices.

  • May 01, 2024

    SpaceX Again Asks 5th Circ. To Step Into NLRB Challenge

    SpaceX called on the Fifth Circuit Wednesday to freeze a National Labor Relations Board hearing scheduled for Thursday afternoon, saying in its second trip to the appeals court that it will suffer irreparable harm if the administrative suit proceeds before the agency it claims is unconstitutional.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Judge Skeptical Of Medicare Drug 'Price-Setting'

    A Fifth Circuit judge on Wednesday sharply criticized the Biden administration's Medicare drug pricing program, characterizing it as government "price-setting" and questioning "what possible procompetitive justification" there can be for penalizing companies that don't participate.

  • May 01, 2024

    How College GCs Are Dealing With Drama Of Protests

    New York City police descended on the Columbia University campus late Tuesday to arrest encamped protesters of the Israel-Gaza war, as general counsel for at least 20 universities across the nation grapple with how best to keep students safe while protecting everyone's free-speech rights.

  • May 01, 2024

    Attys Seek $95M In Fees For Elite Schools' Aid-Fixing Deals

    Class counsel representing students who accused 17 top universities of colluding to fix student aid packages have asked an Illinois federal judge to award them $94.7 million in fees plus $3.5 million in expenses for securing $284 million in settlements with 10 schools.

  • May 01, 2024

    Willkie Lands Akin Gump M&A Pro In Houston

    Willkie Farr & Gallagher LLP is expanding its Texas team, announcing Wednesday it is bringing in a mergers and acquisitions pro and energy expert from Akin Gump Strauss Hauer & Feld LLP as a partner for its Houston office.

  • May 01, 2024

    Kirkland Rips 'Tortured' Theory In Texas Judge Romance Suit

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP's inclusion in a Texas federal suit accusing it of conspiring with Jackson Walker LLP, a disgraced Texas bankruptcy judge and a former Jackson Walker partner who was his romantic partner to oust a CEO is based on "a tortured theory" and "flimsy facts," the firm declared.

  • May 01, 2024

    5th Circ. Wants Texas Injunction Ruling In CFPB Late Fee Case

    In a late Tuesday twist, the Fifth Circuit has sent a banking industry lawsuit over the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's $8 credit card late fee rule back to Texas federal court, saying it doesn't want to be the first to decide whether the rule should be blocked from taking effect later this month.

  • April 30, 2024

    5th Circ. Nixes Software Co.'s $1.6B Win In IBM Contract Row

    The Fifth Circuit on Tuesday reversed a Texas federal court's $1.6 billion ruling against IBM, finding that Houston-based software company BMC lost out to IBM "fair and square" when IBM fulfilled a request by their mutual client AT&T to replace BMC's software in AT&T's mainframe with IBM's.

  • April 30, 2024

    'Hatchet-Wielding' Killer Can't Join Netflix Suit, Judge Rules

    Convicted killer "Kai the Hatchet-Wielding Hitchhiker" can't get in on a defamation suit involving a Netflix documentary about the murderer's life, a Texas federal judge ruled Monday, saying that his claims don't have a sufficient basis to warrant intervention in the lawsuit.

  • April 30, 2024

    Chicago Wants Help Probing Migrant-Moving Bus Companies

    Chicago is asking for an Illinois state court's help to enforce subpoenas the city says it issued to learn more about illegal migrant transportation services several bus companies have provided for the state of Texas, saying the companies have ignored its information requests.

Expert Analysis

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

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    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Insurer's '600-Lb. Life' Win Shows Why Fraud Suits Don't Stick

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    A Texas federal court’s recent ruling that Philadelphia Indemnity Co. did not fraudulently induce Megalomedia, the production company behind reality show “My 600-Lb. Life,” into purchasing insurance, demonstrates why a policyholder’s fraudulent inducement claim against an insurer will rarely succeed, says Robert Tugander at Rivkin Radler.

  • 3 Types Of Evidence Excluded Pretrial In 2023 TM Cases

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    Dylan I. Scher at Quinn Emanuel reviews three areas of rulings on motions in limine from 2023 where parties successfully excluded evidence in a trademark dispute, for legal practitioners to consider for future cases.

  • New Texas Funds For Water And Power Projects: Key Points

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    Two amendments to the Texas Constitution recently approved by the state's voters, implementing public funds for water and energy projects, may incentivize private companies to participate in development of new water and power infrastructure in Texas — and could well serve as a model for similar partnerships elsewhere, say attorneys at O'Melveny.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Sets Bostock, Faith Exemption Up For Review

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    The Fifth Circuit's Braidwood v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission decision could tee up U.S. Supreme Court review of whether employing an individual to whose protected class the employer objects infringes on the employer's religious beliefs, potentially narrowing LGBTQ worker protections from the high court's 2020 Bostock v. Clayton County decision, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Alcohol's E-Commerce Spike Brings Regulatory Dilemmas

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    In the evolving landscape of beverage alcohol e-commerce, the clash between supplier marketing and tied-house laws poses challenges, with regulators grappling to keep pace with the digital marketplace, leaving the industry in a gray area, says Jaci Flug at Greenspoon Marder.

  • IRA Monetization Energizes Clean Power Tax Credit Market

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    Recent large sales of clean energy production tax credits reflect an environment in which the Inflation Reduction Act's provisions for monetizing such credits via direct transfer — bypassing slow, costly tax equity transactions — offer opportunities for both developers and investors, says Andrew Eastman at Husch Blackwell.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 1 Year In, Money Laundering Law Tweak May Have Big Impact

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    Despite receiving little attention, Congress' quiet extension of the statute of limitations for money laundering offenses involving foreign bribery offenses is a powerful prosecutorial tool that defense counsel can nevertheless counter by using certain pretrial challenges, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

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