Retail & E-Commerce

  • May 01, 2024

    AI Is Top Of Mind For Companies — And Securities Regulators

    As references to artificial intelligence in securities filings soar, attorneys say companies must ground their disclosures in fact and be upfront about risks posed by AI in order to avoid the wrath of regulators, who promise to crack down on misleading claims.

  • May 01, 2024

    Vape Wholesaler Can't Escape Suit Over Exploding Battery

    A Washington federal judge has refused to let e-cigarette wholesaler Vapor Beast LLC out of a suit by a man alleging he was injured by an exploding lithium-ion battery, saying there isn't enough evidence for the court to determine whether his claims were filed on time.

  • April 30, 2024

    Berry Dunn McNeil Sued Over Breach Affecting 1M Clients

    Maine-based accounting firm Berry Dunn McNeil & Parker LLC faces a proposed class action Tuesday in federal court alleging it failed to adequately protect its clients' personally identifiable information that was compromised during a data breach last year which affected over a million people.

  • April 30, 2024

    OpenAI Tries To Throw Out Another Copyright Case

    OpenAI is seeking to dismiss a suit in New York federal court from two alternative news websites asserting copyright infringement allegations against the Microsoft Corp.-backed artificial intelligence developer, saying they haven't shown they've been harmed.

  • April 30, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Costco's Win In Gas Price-Matching Feud

    The Seventh Circuit on Tuesday upheld Costco's victory against a dozen Wisconsin gas stations that claimed the warehouse giant sold regular unleaded fuel below a statutory minimum markup price that allegedly caused a decline in revenue, finding no evidence showing that Costco's pricing practices caused the stations a single lost sale.

  • April 30, 2024

    Kroger, Albertsons Say FTC Distorts Markets In Merger Case

    Kroger and Albertsons told an Oregon federal court to reject a pending merger challenge by the Federal Trade Commission and a group of states, saying it distorts the competitive landscape for the grocery and labor markets.

  • April 30, 2024

    Wash. Job Applicant's Pay Transparency Suit Tossed For Now

    A Washington federal judge tossed a job applicant's state pay transparency suit against a rent-to-own retailer, ruling the job-seeker didn't prove how the company's failure to include pay information in a job listing negatively affected him.

  • April 30, 2024

    FTC Digging Into $2.3B Walmart-Vizio Deal

    The Federal Trade Commission wants information about Walmart's $2.3 billion plan to take over smart television maker Vizio before it decides whether to sign off on the controversial acquisition.

  • April 30, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Upholds TM Win For Brazilian Hair Products Co.

    A Tuesday precedential ruling from the Federal Circuit sided with a Brazilian hair products maker in its legal fight with a Massachusetts businessman over who could claim a Portuguese phrase celebrating curly hair.

  • April 30, 2024

    Feds Endorse Easing Marijuana Status In Big Policy Shift

    Federal drug enforcers will recommend loosening restrictions on cannabis for the first time since the drug was made federally illegal decades ago, the U.S. Department of Justice announced Tuesday.

  • April 30, 2024

    Don't Miss It: McDermott, Paul Weiss Lead Month's Hot Deals

    A lot can happen in the world of mergers and acquisitions over the course of a month. Here, Law360 recaps the deals you may have missed, including transactions helmed by McDermott and Paul Weiss.

  • April 30, 2024

    Atty, Pot Entrepreneurs Get Conspiracy Claims Thrown Out

    A California state appeals court has thrown out claims against a group of attorneys and cannabis entrepreneurs that they were part of a "straw man practice" conspiracy to monopolize the San Diego cannabis market, finding the complaint failed to allege they did anything illegal.

  • April 30, 2024

    EPA Finalizes Methylene Chloride Ban

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday finalized a rule banning all consumer uses and most industrial and commercial uses of methylene chloride, a chemical regulators say can increase cancer risks and cause reproductive damage with repeat exposure. 

  • April 29, 2024

    High Court Won't Revisit Class Cert. In Chili's Data Breach Row

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to review an Eleventh Circuit ruling that kept alive a class action claiming Chili's restaurants failed to protect customer data in a 2018 data breach that revealed millions of credit card records, which class counsel said "enshrines a path" toward compensation for consumers against companies that mishandle their data.

  • April 29, 2024

    Amazon Files $200M Countersuit Over Solar Projects' Fallout

    Amazon claims a California-based private equity firm reneged on a pair of 15-year deals to sell it power from two new solar developments, launching a suit in Washington state court following competing allegations in California that the retail giant tried to sabotage the projects after signing the deals.

  • April 29, 2024

    Ex-Girlfriend Can Claim Late P&G Worker's Investment Funds

    The ex-girlfriend of a deceased Procter & Gamble employee can receive over $754,000 he had in his investment account after a decades-long career with the company, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Monday, finding that the employee's estate hadn't shown he was misled about who he'd chosen as a beneficiary.

  • April 29, 2024

    Target, Grubhub Say Visa, Mastercard Fee Deal Is A Scam

    Visa and Mastercard's settlement to slash their merchant fees by some $30 billion over the next several years has no fans in Target and Grubhub, who told the judge overseeing the long-running antitrust litigation that the deal isn't fair to anyone except the credit titans.

  • April 29, 2024

    Zillow Fights Investor Cert. In Home Pricing Program Suit

    Zillow urged a Washington federal court not to certify a class of shareholders amid an investor's suit alleging he was misled about the performance of its home-flipping program, arguing that the alleged misstatements had no bearing on stock prices.

  • April 29, 2024

    Bookstores Want In On FTC's Antitrust Case Against Amazon

    A trade group for bookstores has asked a Washington federal court for permission to intervene in the Federal Trade Commission's antitrust case against Amazon to raise concerns about the e-commerce giant's sale of books and contracts with publishers.

  • April 29, 2024

    Apple Says Nothing's Changed To Revive COVID App Suit

    Apple urged a California federal judge not to reopen a tossed antitrust lawsuit over the company's refusal to distribute a COVID-19-tracking app on the App Store, arguing that neither new European Union law nor Epic Games' jury win over Google change the dynamics of a case that has favored the iPhone maker at every turn.

  • April 29, 2024

    Defendant Seeks Tribe's Confidential Data In Smoke Shop Suit

    An entrepreneur being sued by the Cayuga Nation is arguing in New York federal court that he should be allowed to view "highly confidential" spreadsheets purportedly detailing revenue losses the tribe suffered due to an unlicensed smoke shop on tribal land, asserting he has no business ties to the store.

  • April 29, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    A multibillion-dollar Tesla trust proposal, a Truth Social bond, power plays over Prince's estate, and three in the ring for World Wrestling Entertainment. All of this and much more came up in Delaware Chancery Court dockets last week.

  • April 29, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Nike Settles TM Suit Against Bape Over Shoe Designs

    Nike has settled its trademark infringement suit accusing Bape of copying the "iconic" look of its Air Force 1 and Air Jordan sneakers, according to a notice of voluntary dismissal Monday, which comes nearly two months after a New York federal judge refused to nix the case.

  • April 29, 2024

    Trade Court Presses Commerce Dept. On Korean Electricity

    The question of whether South Korean authorities subsidize the country's steel producers is again before the trade court as of Monday, with the U.S. Department of Commerce heading into a third remand over a 2018 duty review.

  • April 29, 2024

    StarKist Looks To Block Guilty Plea From Price-Fixing Trial

    StarKist and its South Korea-based owner are urging a California federal judge to reject a bid by packaged tuna buyers to bring evidence of the tuna company's guilty plea into the civil litigation, arguing that the plea agreement with the U.S. Department of Justice is irrelevant to a trial over claims that major tuna brands conspired to keep prices high.

Expert Analysis

  • What Retailers Should Note In Calif. Web Tracking Suits

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    As retailers face a deluge of class actions alleging the use of conventional web analytic tools violate wiretapping and eavesdropping provisions of the California Invasion of Privacy Act, uncovering the path toward a narrow interpretation of the law will largely depend on how these cases proceed, say Matthew Pearson and Kareem Salem at BakerHostetler.

  • Chancery's Sears Ruling Clarifies Stockholder Duties

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    In a recent landmark decision involving stockholders of Sears Hometown and Outlet Stores, the Delaware Chancery Court addressed for the first time what precise duties a controlling stockholder owes, highlighting that controller interference with board action is not per se invalid and that enhanced scrutiny is a reasonableness test, say Christopher Chuff and Taylor Bartholomew at Troutman Pepper.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

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    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Expediting Psychedelics Approvals In The US And Canada

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    Accelerated regulatory pathways for psychedelics in the U.S. and Canada play a pivotal role in the progression of drugs, devices and novel therapies toward commercialization, say Kimberly Chew at Husch Blackwell, and Ana Dukic and Sabrina Ramkellawan at AxialBridge.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • New Strain Of Web Tracking Suits Pose Risks For Retailers

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    Amid an ongoing surge of California state and federal lawsuits that are using novel theories to allege companies used certain recording technologies to illegally track website users, retailers should take steps to develop a potential argument that customers consented to any alleged uses of these devices, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Ex-OpenSea Staffer Case May Clarify When Info Is Property

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    In considering the appeal of a former OpenSea manager’s wire fraud conviction in U.S. v. Chastain, the Second Circuit may soon provide guidance about whether economic information is traditional property in certain insider trading prosecutions — a theory of fraud that the U.S. Supreme Court has repeatedly narrowed, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Unraveling The Bundled Benefits Of Retail Memberships

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    The recent prevalence of paid retail memberships and the associated findings of a consumer survey suggest that assessing consumer preferences and welfare may be important when considering resolution mechanisms in antitrust contexts, say Rosa M. Abrantes-Metz at Berkeley Research Group, Mame Maloney at The Brattle Group and Jeff Brazell at the University of Utah.

  • Opinion

    Stakeholder Amici Should Be Heard In Russian Trade Case

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    Although the U.S. Court of International Trade recently rejected U.S. Steel's amicus brief in NLMK Pennsylvania v. U.S., other industry stakeholders should seek to appear — and the court should allow it because additional perspectives will lead to a more informed ruling, say attorneys Jeffrey Shapiro and Michael Andrews.

  • Workplace Speech Policies Limit Legal And PR Risks

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    As workers increasingly speak out on controversies like the 2024 elections and the Israel-Hamas war, companies should implement practical workplace expression policies and plans to protect their brands and mitigate the risk of violating federal and state anti-discrimination and free speech laws, say attorneys at McDermott.

  • US Cos. Must Guard Against Russian Diversion Of Goods

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    Amid allegations that Russia is end-running trade sanctions through the diversion of otherwise innocuous, everyday goods, U.S. industry involved in the manufacture or distribution of electric products must step up its customer and partner due diligence to avoid unwittingly facilitating the weapons proliferation cycle, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

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