Pennsylvania

  • March 21, 2024

    3rd Circ. Agrees Investors Have No Case Against Vax Maker

    The Third Circuit on Thursday upheld a Pennsylvania federal judge's ruling that a putative class of investors alleging biopharmaceutical company Ocugen Inc. made misleading statements about its ability to quickly produce a COVID-19 vaccine failed to state a claim against the company.

  • March 21, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Nominees Face New Barriers

    President Joe Biden is encountering new hurdles to placing his judicial nominees on the bench, particularly one who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge if confirmed.

  • March 21, 2024

    Plan Admin. Escapes Ex-Aerospace Execs' Death Benefits Suit

    A third-party administrator isn't liable for misrepresentation and negligence claims from former aerospace company executives over death benefits, a Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled, saying the administrator isn't to blame for the plaintiffs' lack of understanding about the termination of a deferred compensation plan.

  • March 20, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Bias Suit Against Aramark

    A discrete discriminatory act within the statute of limitations against an employee can make a hostile work environment claim timely if an employee shows it's a part of ongoing discriminatory conduct, the Second Circuit ruled Wednesday, reviving a bias suit a female manager brought against food service giant Aramark Services Inc.

  • March 20, 2024

    Philly Charter School Exec Convicted Of Embezzlement

    A nonprofit executive was convicted Wednesday in Pennsylvania federal court on all 18 counts of siphoning funds from a tax-exempt educational and housing organization to live lavishly, while the same jury found a colleague guilty of conspiracy to commit fraud but absolved him of other charges.

  • March 20, 2024

    Endo Plan To Trim $5B In Debt Confirmed By NY Judge

    Drugmaker Endo International got a New York bankruptcy judge's approval for its Chapter 11 plan that aims to cut more than $5 billion in debt and hand over ownership to its lenders, roughly a month after it finalized a $465 million deal to resolve criminal and civil opioid claims.

  • March 20, 2024

    Penn Grad Worker Unit Leaves Out Some Science Fellows

    A National Labor Relations Board official ordered a representation election among graduate student workers at the University of Pennsylvania, but left out of the bargaining unit some 300 student workers in biology and biomedical sciences programs, finding that the union previously said they shouldn't be included.

  • March 20, 2024

    Montgomery McCracken Adds Litigation Pro In Philly

    Montgomery McCracken Walker & Rhoads LLP has added a former Weitz & Luxenberg PC attorney and seasoned litigation specialist to its team in Philadelphia.

  • March 20, 2024

    Defunct Philly Hospital Inks $32M End To Birth Injury Suit

    A defunct Philadelphia hospital has agreed to pay $32 million to resolve allegations that a delayed cesarean section caused a baby to suffer severe brain damage, Kline & Specter announced Wednesday.

  • March 20, 2024

    Pa. Insurance Broker On Hook For Not Paying Real OT

    A Pennsylvania-based insurance brokerage willfully violated federal wage law when it misrepresented overtime hours employees worked and otherwise dodged wage requirements, a federal judge ruled in a case brought by the U.S. Department of Labor.

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    IRS Asks Justices To Scrap Couple's Late-Filed Tax Court Suit

    The IRS asked the U.S. Supreme Court to consider reversing the Third Circuit's revival of a couple's challenge to their tax bill, saying the appeals court incorrectly concluded that a 90-day deadline for petitioning the U.S. Tax Court need not always be met.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Pa. Obstetrician Keeps Trial Win In Delivery Injury Suit

    A Pennsylvania appellate panel affirmed a verdict clearing an obstetrician of liability in a suit accusing her of negligently delivering a baby and causing a permanent nerve injury, saying the plaintiffs "fundamentally misunderstand" how an appellate court reviews a trial court's evidentiary rulings.

  • March 20, 2024

    NJ Town Exits Eagles Fan's Battery Suit Over QB's Football

    A Philadelphia Eagles fan has dropped the town of East Rutherford, New Jersey, from his suit claiming he was battered at MetLife Stadium after quarterback Jalen Hurts gave him a game ball, but the other defendants are still on the hook, according to court documents.

  • March 20, 2024

    Counterclaim Tossed In Attys' Fight Over Broken Biz Alliance

    A federal judge has handed one victory in a larger battle to a lawyer and his Philadelphia-based law firm suing another attorney over a business relationship gone south, agreeing that a counterclaim from the defendant for breach of contract can't stand.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Nevada Dem. Says She Can't Support 3rd Circ. Nom.

    U.S. Sen. Catherine Cortez Masto, D-Nevada, on Tuesday became the first Democrat to publicly say she cannot support Adeel Mangi, nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge, if confirmed.

  • March 19, 2024

    McDonald's Franchisee's Ch. 11 Plan Approved With Deal

    A Pittsburgh McDonald's franchisee received court approval Tuesday for its Chapter 11 plan after also getting the nod on a $4.35 million settlement with a former employee who was sexually assaulted as a minor by her manager at one of the debtor's restaurants.

  • March 19, 2024

    Philly Paralegals Get OK For OT Collective, But Not Class

    A group of some 200 paralegals in the Philadelphia District Attorney's Office may pursue claims of unpaid overtime compensation as a collective but not a class, a Pennsylvania federal court held, finding a proposed class of representatives lacked evidence of a common injury.

  • March 19, 2024

    Cancer Patient Fights Monsanto's Philadelphia Roundup Win

    A cancer patient alleging that he developed his illness after using the weed killer Roundup wants to overturn Bayer AG unit Monsanto's first win in Philadelphia's Roundup mass tort, arguing that the judge's erroneous evidentiary rulings caused him to lose the case.

  • March 20, 2024

    Future Of Judge-Shopping Reform Hazy After Rule Proposal

    The policymaking body for U.S. courts provoked a stir last week when it proposed a rule designed to curb "judge shopping," with observers saying that the policy does address one type of the practice but that it remains to be seen if individual federal district courts will be willing to adopt even that limited reform.

  • March 19, 2024

    Leech Tishman Tells 6th Circ. Time Ran Out On Fraud Suit

    A former Leech Tishman attorney was not party to a tolling agreement between his law firm and investors caught in a Ponzi scheme he allegedly should have warned them away from, so the firm should escape vicarious liability once the time limit expired for the investors to sue him, counsel for the firm told the Sixth Circuit Tuesday.

Expert Analysis

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • The 4 Top Philadelphia Commerce Court Opinions Of 2023

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    Four 2023 rulings from the Philadelphia County Court of Common Pleas — including decisions on judicial privilege, stay requests, sheriff's sales and the appointment of a receiver — highlight the court's commitment to stringent standards and address evolving challenges in commercial litigation, say Jonathan Hugg and Sarah Boutros at Eckert Seamans.

  • 5 Trends To Watch In Property And Casualty Class Actions

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    In 2023, class action decisions have altered the landscape for five major types of claims affecting property and casualty insurers — total loss vehicle valuation, labor depreciation, other structural loss estimating theories, total loss vehicle tax and regulatory fees, and New Mexico's uninsured and underinsured motorist coverage sale requirements, say Mark Johnson and Mathew Drocton at BakerHostetler.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • What 3rd Circ. Gets Wrong About Arbitration Enforcement

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    The Third Circuit and other courts should correct their current law, exemplified by the Third Circuit's recent decision in Henry v. Wilmington Trust, requiring a motion to dismiss based on an arbitration clause because it conflicts with the Federal Arbitration Act, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and — with regard to the improper-venue approach — U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says David Cinotti at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

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    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Pa. Court's Venue Ruling Is Likely To Worsen Forum Shopping

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    The Pennsylvania Supreme Court’s recent Hangey v. Husqvarna decision claims to narrowly clarify the standard for evaluating whether a venue is proper, but has broader implications that are likely to exacerbate the forum-shopping problem that already plagues corporate defendants in Pennsylvania, says Stefanie Pitcavage Mekilo and Joseph Schaeffer at Babst Calland.

  • Pa. City Ch. 9 Ruling Raises Municipal Financing Concerns

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    A Pennsylvania district court’s recent ruling in a Chapter 9 case filed by the city of Chester, Pennsylvania, strengthens the foundations of the municipal bond market, but also demonstrates that bankruptcy courts continue to struggle with some of the features of municipal revenue bonds and issue rulings that contradict market expectations, say attorneys at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

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