Pennsylvania

  • April 05, 2024

    Fox Rothschild Adds Pietragallo Gordon Litigator In Philly

    An experienced trial attorney in Philadelphia has jumped to Fox Rothschild from Pietragallo Gordon Alfano Bosick & Raspanti LLP.

  • April 05, 2024

    Judicial Nominees On Schumer's Post-Recess To-Do List

    Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer, D-N.Y., laid out on Friday a busy agenda for when Congress returns next week, which includes confirming the president's judicial nominees.

  • April 04, 2024

    DOL Says Defunct Mushroom Farm Deserted Retirement Plan

    A defunct mushroom farm and its owner broke federal benefits law when they abandoned an employee retirement plan and prevented approximately 70 people from accessing their accounts, the U.S. Department of Labor alleged in Pennsylvania federal court Thursday.

  • April 04, 2024

    FCC Refuses To Restore Pa. Felon's FM Radio License

    The Federal Communications Commission has denied a Pennsylvania man's request to restore his radio license after he pled guilty to using a hidden camera to take and send nude photos of a woman.

  • April 04, 2024

    Caterpillar 'Talking Out Both Sides,' Judge Says

    A Delaware federal judge chastised Caterpillar Inc. ahead of trial in a series of orders mostly siding with claims from a defunct construction equipment supplier accusing the company of pressuring an online auctioneer to break an important contract with the would-be competitor.

  • April 04, 2024

    John Eastman Says Inactive Status Hampers Livelihood

    Former Donald Trump attorney John Eastman asked the State Bar Court of California on Wednesday to delay placing him on inactive enrollment while he appeals the recommendation for his disbarment, saying he can't sustain the loss of his livelihood representing clients like Matt Gaetz and Marjorie Taylor Greene.

  • April 04, 2024

    Domino's Franchise Shorted Mileage, Pa. Delivery Driver Says

    The owners of a group of Domino's Pizza franchises have been hit with a putative collective action in Pennsylvania federal court from an ex-delivery driver claiming drivers at their stores are paid less than minimum wage because of their "flawed" policy of reimbursing mileage expenses.

  • April 04, 2024

    Real Estate Fraudster Wins 3rd Circ. Bid To Testify

    The real estate agent who helped ex-NFL player Irving Fryar in a scheme to defraud several banks out of $1 million in mortgages was wrongly denied the ability to testify on his own behalf at a hearing over alleged violations of his supervised release, the Third Circuit ruled in a precedential opinion Thursday.

  • April 04, 2024

    Pierson Ferdinand Brings On Morgan Lewis Litigator In Philly

    Newly formed Pierson Ferdinand LLP has added a high-stakes employment litigator to its Philadelphia office from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • April 03, 2024

    Voters Say Ex-Official Won Since Undated Ballots Don't Count

    Supporters of a Pennsylvania town political candidate told a state appellate panel Wednesday that the Montgomery County Board of Elections should have certified the 2023 election results shortly after the vote instead of waiting for a federal court ruling that allowed certain mail-in ballots to change the outcome — especially since that ruling has since been overturned.

  • April 03, 2024

    Philly Injection Site Org. Isn't Religious, Judge Rules

    A Pennsylvania federal judge on Wednesday ruled that an overdose prevention organization planning to open a supervised safe-injection site in Philadelphia is not a religious entity, delivering a win to the U.S. Department of Justice, which opposed the site.

  • April 03, 2024

    Pool Pump Co. Says 3rd Circ. Must Vacate New Energy Rule

    Pool products maker Zodiac Pool Systems LLC went to the Third Circuit Wednesday to challenge a new U.S. Department of Energy rule that the company says goes beyond the department's legal authority by setting energy conservation standards for pool pumps, which Zodiac asserts are exempt from such regulations.

  • April 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Judge Wonders If Philly Union Rule Dispute Is Moot

    A Third Circuit judge on Wednesday wondered whether a former Philadelphia mayor's order requiring contractors to pay dues to "city-approved" unions was now moot, given the new administration's assurances that it won't be implemented, as contractors urged the court to find that the scrapped rule should be banned by law.

  • April 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Won't Block Order To Replace NJ 'County Line' Ballot

    A federal appellate court panel refused Wednesday to block a district court order requiring New Jersey to change the layout of its ballot before the June 4 primary, even though some county clerks who are responsible for preparing the ballots argued that it was not feasible to make the changes in time.

  • April 03, 2024

    14 AGs Urge DOL To Seek More Payroll Info From Contractors

    Contractors performing construction, alteration or repair work on government buildings should have to give the U.S. Department of Labor more detailed information about the deductions they take from workers' wages, a coalition of Democratic state attorneys general told the agency in a letter publicized Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    Veteran Atty Joins Saxton & Stump To Co-Chair Estates Group

    A seasoned attorney with more than 40 years of experience in tax law and estate planning has joined Saxton & Stump in Harrisburg, Pennsylvania, after practicing for four years with local firm Johnson Duffie Stewart & Weidner.

  • April 02, 2024

    Backlash To 3rd Circ. Nom Could Hamper More Muslim Picks

    Only two Muslims serve on the federal bench, well below the prevalence of people practicing the faith within the U.S., and the recent travails of a third picked to serve on the court might bode ill for adding more.

  • April 02, 2024

    3rd Circ. Preview: Black Lung, Back Pay On Tap In April

    The Third Circuit this month will consider Keystone Coal Mining Co.'s contention that a lower court erred in deeming a miner's black lung a "total disability," while a shuttered rehabilitation facility has asked the court to undo the National Labor Relations Board's determination that it owes unionized employees back pay and bonuses for work done during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 02, 2024

    'Road Not Taken': Uber Defends Verdict With Poetic Flair

    Making reference to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," Uber Technologies Inc. on Monday said a group of UberBlack drivers chose their road when they urged a Pennsylvania federal court to consider less than a unanimous verdict, and could not turn back around when the jurors leaned toward declaring them independent contractors.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Army Officer Says Gov't Smeared Him With False Claims

    A former major general in the U.S. Army on Tuesday sued the U.S. Department of Defense and others, alleging that the government wrongly recorded him as having assaulted his partner, despite her recanting the allegations and admitting they were a ploy to seek attention.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ohio Regulator Urges Justices To Review FERC Deadlock Rule

    The Public Utilities Commission of Ohio has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to review the Third Circuit's decision upholding a rule change from the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission that took effect despite a commissioner deadlock, arguing that the appellate court didn't apply a fitting standard.

  • April 02, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds 11-Atty Burns White Team In Pittsburgh

    Nearly a dozen litigators have moved their practices from Burns White LLC to Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP's Pittsburgh office.

  • April 02, 2024

    100-Plus Groups Rally Behind Adeel Mangi For 3rd Circ.

    Over 100 federal and state advocacy groups sent a letter to senators on Tuesday urging them to support Adeel Mangi, nominee for the Third Circuit, who would be the first Muslim federal appellate judge if confirmed, amid increasing opposition to him.

  • April 01, 2024

    AIG Unit Can't Toss Conn. Utility's $3M Defense Cost Bid

    An AIG unit can't escape the Connecticut Municipal Electric Energy Cooperative's third-party suit seeking to recoup $3 million in legal expenses, a Connecticut federal court ruled, saying the cooperative has standing to pursue coverage on behalf of its former CEO who was convicted of stealing public funds.

  • April 01, 2024

    Women Must Arbitrate Suit Over Ex-Coach's Hidden Cam

    Newly discovered texts and files on a former Temple University football coach's devices won't help three women revive or revise their lawsuits against the coach and the dog-sitting app he used to recruit them, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled Friday.

Expert Analysis

  • Perspectives

    6 Practice Pointers For Pro Bono Immigration Practice

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    An attorney taking on their first pro bono immigration matter may find the law and procedures beguiling, but understanding key deadlines, the significance of individual immigration judges' rules and specialized aspects of the practice can help avoid common missteps, says Steven Malm at Haynes Boone.

  • Lessons From Country Singer's Personal Service Saga

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    Recent reports that country singer Luke Combs won a judgment against a Florida woman who didn’t receive notice of the counterfeit suit against her should serve as a reminder for attorneys on best practices for effectuating service by electronic means, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • 3 Areas Of Focus In Congressional Crosshairs This Year

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    Companies must prepare for Congress to build on its 2023 oversight priorities this year, continuing its vigorous inquiries into Chinese company-related investments, workplace safety and labor relations issues, and generative artificial intelligence, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Baking Bread Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    After many years practicing law, and a few years baking bread, I have learned that there are a few keys to success in both endeavors, including the assembly of a nourishing and resilient culture, and the ability to learn from failure and exercise patience, says Rick Robinson at Reed Smith.

  • Federal Courts And AI Standing Orders: Safety Or Overkill?

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    Several district court judges have issued standing orders regulating the use of artificial intelligence in their courts, but courts should consider following ordinary notice and comment procedures before implementing sweeping mandates that could be unnecessarily burdensome and counterproductive, say attorneys at Curtis.

  • 7 E-Discovery Predictions For 2024 And Beyond

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    The legal and technical issues of e-discovery now affect virtually every lawsuit, and in the year to come, practitioners can expect practices and policies to evolve in a number of ways, from the expanded use of relevancy redactions to mandated information security provisions in protective orders, say attorneys at Littler.

  • Workplace Challenges Amid Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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    Recent tension over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has caused challenges in the employment sphere, sparking the question of whether employees can be legally disciplined for speaking out on issues related to the conflict, which depends on various circumstances, says Alok Nadig at Sanford Heisler.

  • Justice O'Connor Was Architect of ERISA's Lasting Success

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    U.S. Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor laid the foundations of Employee Retirement Income Security Act jurisprudence, defining a default standard of review, preemption rules and the act's interplay with employment law, through opinions that are still instructive as ERISA approaches its 50th anniversary, says José Jara at Fox Rothschild.

  • A Closer Look At The Federal Criminal Enforcement Slump

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    Former Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein, now at King & Spalding, explains that the U.S. Department of Justice’s statistical reports reveal that federal authorities are considerably less productive today than in the past, as criminal prosecutions fell in 2022 in every major category, for reasons that are not entirely clear.

  • 5 Litigation Funding Trends To Note In 2024

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    Over the next year and beyond, litigation funding will continue to evolve in ways that affect attorneys and the larger litigation landscape, from the growth of a secondary market for funded claims, to rising interest rates restricting the availability of capital, says Jeffery Lula at GLS Capital.

  • Key Issues When Navigating A Tenant's Bankruptcy

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    In light of recent Chapter 11 filings by Rite Aid and WeWork — companies with thousands of commercial leases — practitioners should review issues that can arise when bankruptcy is used to exit a lease, including the consequences of lease rejection and the statutory cap on landlord damage claims for a rejected lease, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • 3 Power Rulings Change Outlook For Transmission Cos.

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    The cumulative effect of three December power cases that halted state actions that gave preference to incumbent transmission providers could level the playing field for independent developers, say Harvey Reiter and John McCaffrey at Stinson.

  • 4 Legal Ethics Considerations For The New Year

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    As attorneys and clients reset for a new year, now is a good time to take a step back and review some core ethical issues that attorneys should keep front of mind in 2024, including approaching generative artificial intelligence with caution and care, and avoiding pitfalls in outside counsel guidelines, say attorneys at HWG.

  • What The Law Firm Of The Future Will Look Like

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    As the legal landscape shifts, it’s become increasingly clear that the BigLaw business model must adapt in four key ways to remain viable, from fostering workplace flexibility to embracing technology, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • 4 PR Pointers When Your Case Is In The News

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    Media coverage of new lawsuits exploded last year, demonstrating why defense attorneys should devise a public relations plan that complements their legal strategy, incorporating several objectives to balance ethical obligations and advocacy, say Nathan Burchfiel at Pinkston and Ryan June at Castañeda + Heidelman.

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