Ohio

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Joann Fabric Can Tap $95M Of DIP As It Eyes Quick Ch. 11

    Joann Inc., the retailer known as Joann Fabric and Crafts, received a Delaware bankruptcy judge's approval Tuesday on a bundle of first-day motions, ahead of an impending bid for confirmation of its prepackaged Chapter 11 plan to slash over half a billion dollars of debt and let creditors take over the reorganized business.

  • March 19, 2024

    Potential Bias Taints Mich. Courts, Residents Tell 6th Circ.

    Three Michigan residents urged the Sixth Circuit on Monday to revive their lawsuit alleging unconstitutional bias in Michigan's court system, saying judges sitting on the state's claims court and its appellate court may be unwilling to overrule their colleagues.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bettors' Appeal Over Doped Derby Horse Heard By 6th Circ.

    Bettors on the 2021 Kentucky Derby who did not bet on winner Medina Spirit can't claim negligence or damages in court, even though the horse was later disqualified for failing a drug test, an attorney for Churchill Downs told a Sixth Circuit panel on Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Trump Asks Supreme Court For Absolute Criminal Immunity

    Former President Donald Trump implored the U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday to find that former presidents are absolutely immune from criminal charges related to official acts, warning the court that its adoption of a fact-specific test could appear as a "gerrymandered ruling tailored to deprive" him alone of immunity.

  • March 19, 2024

    Kellogg Arbitration Pact Is Invalid, 6th Circ. Told In 401(k) Fight

    A former Kellogg Co. employee urged the Sixth Circuit to reinstate his lawsuit accusing the company of up-charging retirement plan participants with excessive fees, saying the case was wrongly booted to arbitration without his consent.

  • March 19, 2024

    Leech Tishman Tells 6th Circ. Time Ran Out On Fraud Suit

    A former Leech Tishman attorney was not party to a tolling agreement between his law firm and investors caught in a Ponzi scheme he allegedly should have warned them away from, so the firm should escape vicarious liability once the time limit expired for the investors to sue him, counsel for the firm told the Sixth Circuit Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Insurer Meets 6th Circ. Resistance In Bid To Undo Amway Win

    Sixth Circuit judges appeared skeptical Tuesday of an AIG unit's argument that it shouldn't have to defend and indemnify Amway Corp. in copyright litigation, with one judge saying he doubted Amway's self-insured policies should take priority over an AIG internet policy.

  • March 19, 2024

    States Converge On Texas' Challenge To EPA Methane Rule

    A California-led coalition of Democratic attorneys general wants to defend new federal limits on oil and gas industry methane emissions challenged by Texas, Oklahoma and other conservative states, with supporters of the new rules claiming a sovereign interest in protecting their citizens from harmful greenhouse gas pollution.

  • March 19, 2024

    Nippon Steel Tries To Ease Worries Over $14.9B US Steel Deal

    Nippon Steel Corp. pledged to move its North American headquarters to Pennsylvania in an attempt to assure the public that its proposed $14.9 billion acquisition of Pittsburgh-based U.S. Steel will ultimately be good for the domestic steel industry.

  • March 19, 2024

    OptumRx Can't Get Motley Rice Disqualified From Opioid MDL

    An Ohio federal judge has denied a bid by pharmacy benefit manager OptumRx to disqualify Motley Rice LLC from representing plaintiffs in the national opioid litigation, saying the company hasn't shown that the firm's prior representation of states investigating opioids puts the company at a disadvantage in the multidistrict litigation.

  • March 18, 2024

    Food Industry Group Urges 9th Circ. To Keep GMO Labeling Rule

    A trade group representing corporate giants including Coca-Cola and General Mills has urged the Ninth Circuit to keep a federal labeling rule allowing disclosure of genetic modifications to foods to be done digitally, claiming that upsetting the rule would present "significant disruption for industry and consumers alike."

  • March 18, 2024

    Sen. Vance Backs Suit To Declare Google Common Carrier

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and an anti-monopoly nonprofit have backed the Ohio state attorney general's lawsuit seeking to declare Google as a common carrier.

  • March 18, 2024

    Ohio Court Backs School Board's Win In Race, Sex Bias Suit

    An Ohio state appeals court affirmed the Dayton Board of Education's early win in a race and sex bias suit brought against it by a Black former administrator, agreeing with the lower court that she failed to present any direct evidence of discrimination related to her departure.

  • March 18, 2024

    Joann Hits Ch. 11 With $1B Secured Debt, Creditor Deal

    Fabric retailer Joann Inc., better known as Joann Fabrics, filed for bankruptcy in Delaware on Monday with $1 billion in secured debt and an agreement with its creditors to trim $505 million from its balance sheet.

  • March 15, 2024

    Judge Asks Colo. Why Grocery Merger Case Can't Wait

    A state judge in Denver has asked Colorado enforcers why they need to have a hearing on their bid to block Kroger's planned $24.6 billion purchase of fellow grocery store giant Albertsons before other hearings in challenges from federal enforcers and Washington state.

  • March 15, 2024

    Ohio Obstetrician Keeps Trial Win In Suit Over Baby's Death

    An Ohio state appeals court has refused to overturn a trial win for an obstetrician accused of medical malpractice in the delivery of an infant who died shortly after birth, finding that the parents aren't allowed to question the doctor about whether his hospital privileges were pulled following the death.

  • March 15, 2024

    Ohio Ambulance Co. Says HR Firm Botched Tax Returns

    An Ohio ambulance company accused its human resources management firm of failing to accurately prepare and submit amended tax returns that would have allowed the company to claim pandemic-era tax credits, according to a complaint filed in an Ohio federal court.

  • March 15, 2024

    LA Billing Scandal Atty's Estate Can't Revive Fee Dispute

    The estate of an Ohio attorney who was accused of participating in a highly publicized billing settlement scandal involving the Los Angeles Department of Water & Power has lost two probate court bids to recoup fees from the late attorney's former colleagues, with an appeals panel determining the court lacked jurisdiction.

  • March 15, 2024

    Snack Co. Workers Get Cert. In Ohio Wage Suit

    An Ohio federal judge preliminarily certified a collective of food distribution workers on claims that they had to perform work before clocking in and during breaks without pay, saying they proved that the company's policies were applied universally.

  • March 14, 2024

    IP Forecast: Internet Archive Fights Vinyl Copyright Case

    A California federal judge will hear arguments next week over whether the Internet Archive can toss accusations from record labels that describe its project for a free, digitized library of 78 rpm records as a "wholesale theft of generations of music." Here's a look at that case, plus all the other major intellectual property matters on deck in the coming week.

  • March 14, 2024

    Buyers Want Goodyear, Michelin Price-Fixing Suits Combined

    Tire buyers who have accused Goodyear, Michelin, Bridgestone and others of working together to fix the price of replacement tires have asked a New York federal court to consolidate the dozen lawsuits that have piled up against the tire manufacturers.

Expert Analysis

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

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    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

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    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

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    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

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    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

  • Understanding Discovery Obligations In Era Of Generative AI

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Attorneys and businesses must adapt to the unique discovery challenges presented by generative artificial intelligence, such as chatbot content and prompts, while upholding the principles of fairness, transparency and compliance with legal obligations in federal civil litigation, say attorneys at King & Spalding.

  • An Overview Of Circuit Courts' Interlocutory Motion Standards

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    The Federal Arbitration Act allows litigants to file an immediate appeal from an order declining to enforce an arbitration agreement, but the circuit courts differ on the specific requirements for the underlying order as well as which motion must be filed, as demonstrated in several 2023 decisions, says Kristen Mueller at Mueller Law.

  • The Case For Post-Bar Clerk Training Programs At Law Firms

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    In today's competitive legal hiring market, an intentionally designed training program for law school graduates awaiting bar admission can be an effective way of creating a pipeline of qualified candidates, says Brent Daub at Gilson Daub.

  • Ohio Voters Legalize Cannabis — What Comes Next?

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    This month, voters approved a citizen-initiated statute that legalizes marijuana for recreational use in Ohio, but the legalization timeline could undergo significant changes at the behest of the state's lawmakers, say Daniel Shortt and David Waxman at McGlinchey Stafford.

  • Seized Art Ownership Row Highlights Importance Of Vetting

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    The Cleveland Museum of Art's recent suit against the Manhattan District Attorney's Office to block a seizure order and contest its rightful ownership of a headless statue worth $20 million presents an uncommon challenge that underscores the criticality of due diligence prior to acquiring artworks, especially older pieces, say Robert Darwell and Zach Dai at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Attorneys Have An Ethical Duty To Protect The Judiciary

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    The tenor of public disagreement and debate has become increasingly hostile against judges, and though the legislative branch is trying to ameliorate this safety gap, lawyers have a moral imperative and professional requirement to stand with judges in defusing attacks against them and their rulings, says Deborah Winokur at Cozen O'Connor.

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