Native American

  • February 21, 2024

    Tribes, Mich., Feds Refute Great Lakes Fishing Challenge

    Several Native American tribes, the state of Michigan and the federal government urged the Sixth Circuit to reject a sport fishing group's attempt to sink a tribal fishing pact for parts of lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior, arguing it strikes an appropriate balance between respecting tribal fishing rights and protecting the Great Lakes fisheries.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ga. Urges Judge To Reject DOJ Bid To Join Voting Rights Suit

    Georgia officials want a Peach State federal court to reject the Biden administration's delayed attempt to join a lawsuit alleging a recent state election law discriminates against Black voters, arguing the move is driven by the government's concern about losing its own challenge to the state's voting rules.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Considers Adding Missing Persons To Emergency Alerts

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to introduce a new code to the Emergency Alert System to allow information about missing or endangered persons to be widely disseminated.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fond Du Lac Tribe Seeks Sanctions In Mining Land Suit

    The Fond du Lac Band of Lake Superior Chippewa Indians has asked a Minnesota federal judge to sanction PolyMet Mining Inc. in the tribe's suit over a land swap for a copper and nickel mine, arguing that the company and its lawyers are obstructing the discovery process.

  • February 20, 2024

    Groups, Scholars Back Tribes In High Court Healthcare Bid

    A coalition of Native American and Alaskan Native healthcare boards and nonprofits are asking the U.S. Supreme Court to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse two tribes millions in administrative healthcare costs, arguing that the obligation is deeply rooted in the trust relationship between the United States and its Indigenous nations.

  • February 20, 2024

    Calif. Tribe Looks To Undo Tobacco Noncompliance Listing

    The Twenty-Nine Palms of Mission Indians is suing the U.S. government in California federal court over its decision to place the tribe on a "non-compliant list" under a law that targets illegal tobacco trafficking, arguing that its operations comply with all applicable state laws.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fla. Gaming Pact Not Allowed Under Federal Law, Expert Says

    A Miami law school adjunct professor supporting a pair of casinos seeking to undo the Seminole Tribe of Florida's gaming agreement authorizing online sports betting has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to hear the establishments' case or reverse a lower court decision, saying the pact violates the Indian Gaming Regulatory Act.

  • February 20, 2024

    Tribes, Enviro Orgs Can Join Fight Over Tongass Protections

    An Alaska federal judge said a coalition of tribes, conservation groups, fishers and tourism businesses can join litigation to help defend a challenged Biden administration rule that reinstated roadless area protections for some 9 million acres of the vast Tongass National Forest.

  • February 16, 2024

    DOI Announces Final Rule On Class III Indian Gaming

    The U.S. Department of the Interior on Friday announced its final rule on changes to Class III Indian gaming compacts, updating the federal regulation to provide better guidance and transparency for tribes and states to negotiate those agreements under the Indian Gaming and Regulatory Act.

  • February 16, 2024

    Hydro Co. Must Alter, Not Remove, Dam That's Killing Salmon

    A Washington federal judge on Friday said a hydroelectric company must remove part of a rock dam structure killing endangered wild salmon, but the judge declined to order complete removal, saying it went beyond a narrowly tailored remedy zeroing in on what is harming fish.

  • February 16, 2024

    FCC Offers Incentives So Small Carriers Can Use Spectrum

    The Federal Communications Commission's new program to encourage spectrum licensees to divvy up their unused airwaves for sublease to smaller and more rural carriers is now up and running and accepting applications.

  • February 16, 2024

    FERC Rejects Hydro Project Permits Amid Tribal Opposition

    The Federal Energy Regulatory Commission has denied preliminary permits for three proposed hydropower projects on Navajo Nation land in Arizona, saying a recently revised policy clarifying Indigenous rights in the agency's decision-making process and the tribe's overwhelming opposition to the applications swayed the decision.

  • February 16, 2024

    Gov't Wants More Alaskan Native Reps On Subsistence Board

    The U.S. government has plans to strengthen Alaskan Native tribal representation on its Federal Subsistence Board, saying the U.S. Department of the Interior and the U.S. Department of Agriculture have proposed a new rule to add board members with personal experience of subsistence living in rural Alaska.

  • February 15, 2024

    America First Legal Says Disney Favors Women, Minorities

    A group founded by former Trump adviser Stephen Miller accused the Walt Disney Co. of discriminating against white men in its hiring and promotion decisions and on Wednesday asked the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to investigate.

  • February 15, 2024

    New York Says Thruway Doesn't Cut Through Cayuga Land

    New York state officials are asking a federal district court to dismiss litigation by the Cayuga Nation that seeks a cut of the tolls collected on the New York State Thruway, arguing that the tribe can't prove it had possession of the land over which the highway was being built.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    NC Tribe Seeks To Restore Mountain Peak's Cherokee Name

    The Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians is asking the federal government to change the name of the highest point in the Smoky Mountains back to its original Indigenous title, saying the tribe has received overwhelming support from local and regional organizations for the process that began two years ago.

  • February 15, 2024

    DOI Inks Klamath Basin Agreement With Tribes, Water Users

    The U.S. Department of the Interior said it has struck an agreement that will see water users and tribes work together in a push to improve the environment and water supplies in the drought-prone Klamath River Basin of southern Oregon and northern California, pledging $72 million for projects.

  • February 15, 2024

    Wash. Judge Says Tribes Can Seek River Pollution Damages

    A Washington federal judge denied a Teck Resources Ltd. unit's bid for summary judgment on natural resource damages claims that the Confederated Tribes of the Colville Reservation and state of Washington lodged over decades of Upper Columbia River pollution from a smelter in Trail, British Columbia, setting up the matter for a possible trial.

  • February 14, 2024

    USDA Says $20M Will Help Tribes Access Climate Market

    Federally recognized tribes and Alaska Native corporations and villages are getting a $20 million bump to broaden their access to emerging climate markets as a way to address ongoing climate change, the U.S. Department of Agriculture said on Wednesday.

  • February 14, 2024

    Energy Co. Says Tribal Court Being Used To Duck $12M Award

    Merit Energy Operations is asking a federal district court to block two Wyoming tribes from using the tribal judicial system to vacate a $12.6 million arbitration award against them, saying the move is a blatant attempt to escape the ultimate result in the case.

  • February 14, 2024

    Feds, Power Line Developer Decry Tribes' Suit As 'Too Late'

    The federal government and SunZia Transmission LLC, the developer of a 550-mile power line, urged an Arizona federal judge Tuesday to deny a request from tribes and conservations groups for a preliminary injunction halting the project's construction, saying they waited too long to make their challenge.

  • February 14, 2024

    Navajo Say Hopi Tribe Bid To Join Land Trust Suit Is Untimely

    The Navajo Nation has said the Hopi Tribe's attempt to intervene in its lawsuit against the U.S. government over a land trust and casino road easement dispute is untimely, coming after nearly four years of litigation.

  • February 14, 2024

    Patterson Earnhart Names Equity Partners, Opens Wis. Office

    Native American law firm Patterson Earnhart Real Bird & Wilson LLP has announced two new equity partners, one of whom will lead a new office in Wisconsin.

  • February 13, 2024

    Feds Want 'Free Pass' Out Of Climate Suit Trial, Youths Say

    Twenty-one plaintiffs suing to force the U.S. government to curb fossil fuel use and cut carbon emissions told the Ninth Circuit on Monday that the government's latest attempt to pause their lawsuit amounts to its shunning procedural rules and asking for "a free pass out of trial" not available to other people.

Expert Analysis

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Series

    In Focus At The EEOC: Protecting Vulnerable Workers

    Author Photo

    It's meaningful that the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's strategic enforcement plan prioritizes protecting vulnerable workers, particularly as the backlash to workplace racial equity and diversity, equity and inclusion programs continues to unfold, says Dariely Rodriguez at the Lawyers’ Committee for Civil Rights Under Law.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Del. Ruling Adds Momentum For Caremark Plaintiffs

    Author Photo

    The Delaware Supreme Court's recent opinion in Lebanon County Employees' Retirement Fund v. Collis could be viewed as expanding plaintiffs' ability to viably plead a Caremark claim against directors, so Delaware companies should be on heightened alert and focus on creating a record of board oversight, say attorneys at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

    Author Photo

    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

    Author Photo

    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

    Author Photo

    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Supplementation, Conversion, Rejection

    Author Photo

    In this month's bid protest roundup, Lyle Hedgecock and Michaela Thornton at MoFo discuss recent cases highlighting how the U.S. Government Accountability Office and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims consider supplementation of the record and an agency’s attempt to convert a sealed bid opportunity into a negotiated procurement, as well as an example of precedential drift.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

    Author Photo

    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

    Author Photo

    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!