Michigan

  • March 18, 2024

    Developers Say Mich. Township Thwarted Pot Dispensary

    A local cannabis advocacy group that includes real estate developers has sued a Michigan township in federal court, alleging elected officials have impeded a proposal to build a medical and adult-use dispensary despite residents' support and additional tax revenue the municipality will reap.

  • March 18, 2024

    Home Solar Co.'s Ex-CEO Wants Out Of Faulty-Panel Suit

    The CEO of a bankrupt solar company asked a Michigan federal judge on Monday to toss a lawsuit from a couple who purchased a solar system they claim was defective, saying having a "distinctive leadership style" does not make him an alter ego for the company.

  • March 15, 2024

    Sugar Giants Hit With Antitrust Suit Over Alleged Price-Fixing

    A class action filed in New York federal court Thursday alleges that the biggest players in the domestic sugar industry have been engaged in a price-fixing scheme for years.

  • March 15, 2024

    Mich. Justice David Viviano Won't Seek Reelection

    Michigan Supreme Court Justice David F. Viviano announced late Friday that he will not run for reelection this fall and will leave the court when his term expires at the end of this year.

  • March 15, 2024

    'Perplexed' Mich. Panel Restores Eye Doc's $227K Fee Award

    An ophthalmologist who emerged victorious from a decade-long battle over a noncompete agreement with his previous employer should not lose his attorney fee award because of late-breaking evidence that undermined his win, a Michigan state appeals court has ruled.

  • March 15, 2024

    Mich. Judge Wrong To Toss Weather Expert From Icy Fall Suit

    A trial court judge erred by finding that a weather expert's testimony wouldn't be relevant in a caretaker's suit alleging she slipped on black ice at her employer's property, a Michigan appellate panel has said, holding that the weather leading up to and during her fall is directly related to her claims.

  • March 15, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Can't Shut Out Ex-Worker's Age Bias Suit

    A Michigan federal judge said Friday a jury should hear a 58-year-old former Detroit Tigers clubhouse manager's claims that he was fired because of his age, pointing to a record that could show his boss had a pattern of replacing older workers with younger ones.

  • March 15, 2024

    Justices Craft Test To Decide If Social Media Use Is Official

    The U.S. Supreme Court adopted a new test Friday to determine if a public official's social media use constitutes state action subject to liability under the First Amendment, instructing courts to consider whether the official had authority to speak on the government's behalf and whether they purported to do so in the challenged action.

  • March 14, 2024

    GM, LexisNexis Sued For Sharing Driving Data With Insurers

    A Florida driver claims his insurance rate doubled because General Motors and its OnStar unit collected driving data through his Cadillac without permission and shared the information with LexisNexis Risk Solutions, which created a vague driving behavior report that insurance companies use to determine coverage, according to a putative federal class action.

  • March 14, 2024

    'Secret Meeting' Settlement OK Draws Mich. Justices' Scrutiny

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice expressed discomfort Thursday with the idea that government officials could ratify a settlement in a closed-door meeting without consequences, in a case brought by three insurers against a county government's road agency trying to back out of a settlement to which it says it never agreed. 

  • March 14, 2024

    FTC Says Consolidation Endangering Infant-Formula Market

    The Federal Trade Commission has found the country's small number of baby formula manufacturers and the effects of a federal nutrition program contributed to shortages in 2022 and are still making the supply chain vulnerable to disruption.

  • March 14, 2024

    Atty Evading Warrant Fights Fingerprinting In Election Case

    A Michigan attorney refusing to turn herself in after missing a hearing in a criminal case alleging that she tampered with voting machines urged a state appellate court Wednesday to halt the proceedings against her, saying the trial court's demand that she get fingerprinted violates her privacy.

  • March 14, 2024

    Mich. AG Taps Enviro, Regulatory Chiefs As Deputy AGs

    The Michigan Attorney General's Office on Wednesday announced the promotions of two division heads to deputies and the creation of new criminal divisions to focus on victims' services and conviction integrity.

  • March 14, 2024

    Ford Slammed For Bid To 'Sidestep' Faulty Axle-Bolt Suit

    Two Washington SUV owners suing Ford for allegedly slacking on safety in newer Explorer models have accused the vehicle maker of trying to "sidestep liability" in their proposed class action by pointing to two recalls that didn't address the design flaw at issue.

  • March 14, 2024

    Most States Fall Short In Disclosing Justices' Finance Reports

    The vast majority of state supreme courts make it exceedingly difficult for the public to get information about justices' financial entanglements, and the information they do give out is often scant at best, according to a report released Thursday.

  • March 14, 2024

    Whirlpool Can't Toss Defect Suit Over Ice Buildup In Fridges

    A California federal judge has declined to throw out a putative class action claiming Whirlpool hid a defect in its refrigerators that led to cooling failures due to frost buildup, finding the suit sufficiently alleged Whirlpool knew of the problem since it issued technical service pointers noting customers could possibly experience buildup.

  • March 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Kills Orders On Calculating Delivery Driver Costs

    A Sixth Circuit panel has swept away rulings from courts in two separate states — one that sided with pizza delivery drivers and another that sided with the restaurants — over how drivers should be reimbursed for using their cars to make deliveries, saying they both got it wrong.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mich. Justice Torn Over 'Unfairness' Of Law In Treadmill Suit

    A Michigan Supreme Court justice on Wednesday seemed sympathetic to the plight of a woman who was injured when she fell off a treadmill because federal court proceedings affected her ability to timely bring state claims but said he didn't think the state's top court could tackle the likely legislative issue.

  • March 13, 2024

    Versata Wants Axed $105M Ford Verdict Revived Or Expanded

    Versata Software has urged the Federal Circuit to undo a Michigan federal judge's decision erasing a nearly $105 million trade secrets and breach of contract verdict it won against Ford, and argued that it was wrongly barred from presenting damages theories seeking up to $1.3 billion.

  • March 13, 2024

    Atty Who Skipped Vote-Tampering Hearing Can't Ditch Warrant

    A Michigan judge on Wednesday urged counsel for a lawyer evading a bench warrant to direct his client to turn herself in, rejecting claims previous counsel didn't adequately inform her of a hearing she skipped in a case where she's alleged to have tampered with voting machines after the 2020 election.

  • March 13, 2024

    Mich. Justices Open To Counties' Foreclosure Liability Fears

    Two members of the Michigan Supreme Court seemed sympathetic to Michigan counties urging the court to limit their liability for holding onto surplus tax foreclosure proceeds, highlighting during oral arguments that counties were following state law in a practice that was later deemed unconstitutional.

  • March 13, 2024

    6th Circ. Told Woman Helped Life Partner Avoid $3M In Taxes

    The federal government justifiably sold off the property of a woman who paid for it with money from her dead long-term life partner, the U.S. government told the Sixth Circuit on Wednesday, saying the purchase helped her partner skirt more than $3 million in tax liabilities.

  • March 13, 2024

    Flint Found In Contempt Over Lead Pipe Replacement Delays

    A Michigan federal judge has found the city of Flint in contempt for dragging its heels on court orders to replace the city's lead pipes after a 2017 settlement, finding that its belated, partial compliance was not enough to avoid the sanction.

  • March 12, 2024

    'Ghost Gun' Co. Sued In Mich. For Selling To Teen Shooter

    A Michigan resident who was shot by his friend with a handgun made using a do-it-yourself kit has sued a leading supplier of so-called ghost gun kits in state court, alleging the company was negligent by allowing a 17-year-old to buy a gun kit without making sure he was legally able to buy a firearm.

  • March 12, 2024

    Detroit Retirees Appeal Pension Gap Funding Pause

    Detroit's retired police and firefighters are appealing a ruling that allowed the city to continue pausing its pension gap funding payments, asking a Michigan federal court to reverse a bankruptcy judge's decision that extended a decade-long funding reprieve to 30 years.

Expert Analysis

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • Kentucky Tax Talk: Taking Up The Dormant Commerce Clause

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    Attorneys at Frost Brown examine whether the U.S. Supreme Court is likely to review Foresight Coal Sales v. Kent Chandler to consider whether a Kentucky utility rate law discriminates against interstate commerce, and how the decision may affect dormant commerce clause jurisprudence.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Twitter Legal Fees Suit Offers Crash Course In Billing Ethics

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    X Corp.'s suit alleging that Wachtell grossly inflated its fees in the final days of Elon Musk’s Twitter acquisition provides a case study in how firms should protect their reputations by hewing to ethical billing practices and the high standards for professional conduct that govern attorney-client relationships, says Lourdes Fuentes at Karta Legal.

  • Key Strike Considerations For Automotive Industry Suppliers

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    As the UAW's labor contracts with Detroit's Big Three automakers expire, and the possibility of a strike looms, automotive industry suppliers face a number of possible legal and operational issues — and should have strategic action plans in place to deal with contracts, liquidity, the post-strike environment and more, say experts at Alvarez & Marsal.

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • What Circuit Split May Mean For FCA Kickback Liability

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    The recent circuit split on the meaning of the resulting-from provision in False Claims Act kickback cases could have significant ramifications for FCA liability, as it could affect the standard of causation that plaintiffs must meet to establish liability, say former federal prosecutors Li Yu, Ellen London and Gregg Shapiro.

  • Opinion

    Congress Should Ban Employee Body Size Discrimination

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    New York City's recent enactment of a law that bans employers from discriminating against applicants and employees because of their height or weight should signal to Congress that now is the time to establish federal legislation that would prohibit such harmful practices, says Joseph Jeziorkowski at Valiant Law.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

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