Michigan

  • March 22, 2024

    Missed Deadline May Doom Union Worker's Benefits Fight

    A Michigan federal judge on Friday warned a union worker alleging the United Auto Workers mismanaged her claim for benefits that she could have her lawsuit dismissed if she doesn't respond to the union's request to toss the accusations.

  • March 22, 2024

    Trims Recommended In Zelle Fraud Victims' Case Against BofA

    A North Carolina federal magistrate judge has recommended trimming claims in a proposed class action that alleges Bank of America NA didn't compensate for or adequately investigate scammers' unauthorized Zelle transactions despite assurances to victims who lost thousands of dollars.

  • March 22, 2024

    Detroit Hospital, Deaf Patient Can't Avoid Trial In Disability Suit

    Detroit's Henry Ford Health System may face a jury trial in a deaf patient's lawsuit claiming she was denied an American Sign Language interpreter, with a Michigan federal judge refusing to grant summary judgment to either the hospital or the patient.

  • March 22, 2024

    Phone Cos., Counties Profit From Jail Visit Bans, Families Say

    Two prison telecommunications service providers have been hit with lawsuits in Michigan state court claiming they worked with jail operators to restrict in-person visits in order to boost their profits from lockup video and phone calls.

  • March 22, 2024

    6th Circ. Says Fired Doctor Got Enough Due Process

    The Sixth Circuit backed two Ohio healthcare companies and Wright State University's early wins against a former resident doctor's claims that she was improperly fired for unprofessional conduct, stating that all the parties involved engaged in "more than enough due process" before terminating her.

  • March 22, 2024

    'Common Sense' Mich. Ruling Says Photos Not Eavesdropping

    Michigan appellate judges said it's common sense that taking a photograph isn't the same as overhearing a conversation, agreeing with a lower court that a union leader's eavesdropping claim against a rival should be tossed because an image of him posted online doesn't convey a private discussion.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Probes Outside Firm's Outreach To Class Members

    A Sixth Circuit judge suggested Thursday that there may be free-speech issues with an order barring outside attorneys from sending solicitation letters to potential class members poised to benefit from a pending settlement over Michigan counties' tax foreclosure practices.  

  • March 21, 2024

    Ford Says $350K TM Jury Award Can't Be Boosted To $15M

    Ford Motor Co. on Wednesday urged a Michigan federal court to deny a tech company's request to boost an unfair competition award against Ford from less than half a million to $15 million because the tech company didn't challenge Ford's sales and profit data at trial. 

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Skeptical Of Enbridge's Late Pipeline Suit Transfer

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned how Enbridge Energy LP could move a lawsuit seeking to shut down one of its pipelines to federal court more than two years after it was filed, pressing the company Thursday to justify missing the 30-day cutoff for removals.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives McKee's Network Plan Fight With Thrifty Med

    The Sixth Circuit reinstated on Thursday McKee Foods Corp.'s suit against Thrifty MedPlus Pharmacy alleging Tennessee law requiring pharmacy benefit managers to let "any willing pharmacies" participate in a network was preempted by the Employee Retirement Income Security Act, finding that amendments made to the statute didn't render McKee's claims moot.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Doubtful Of Hospital Workers' Vax Exemption Claim

    A Sixth Circuit panel appeared skeptical Thursday of an argument from a class of former employees of Ohio Children's Hospital that their First Amendment rights to freedom of religion were violated under the hospital's COVID-19 employee vaccination policy.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Zeroes In On CBA In Vax Bias Preemption Battle

    A Sixth Circuit panel pressed on Thursday a cargo airline and pilots who say they were unlawfully fired for refusing COVID-19 vaccinations about the pilots' union contract, with one judge asking whether the open questions about their collective bargaining agreement meant the discrimination case was preempted.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Unsure Of OSU, Prof's Harassment Wins

    A Sixth Circuit judge asked an Ohio State University attorney Thursday "why in the world" a jury wasn't allowed to decide parts of a former graduate student's sexual harassment and retaliation claims against the university and a professor.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Judge Doubts Challenge To $39B Student Debt Relief

    A Sixth Circuit judge was skeptical Thursday that two libertarian think tanks had shown the Biden administration's plan to wipe out billions of dollars in student loan debt puts them at a disadvantage to recruit indebted lawyers, saying the groups didn't fully explain who they were competing against.

  • March 21, 2024

    Ky. Coal Mine Owner Tells 6th Circ. Lease Sale Was Improper

    The owner of a sprawling Kentucky coal mine told the Sixth Circuit on Thursday that a sale of leases by the mine's bankrupt operator was improper because the bankruptcy court didn't hold a required hearing on changes to the assignment of leases.

  • March 21, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives 2 Workers' Claims In Religious Vax Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit revived a case alleging an Ohio hospital discriminated against workers by requiring the COVID-19 vaccine despite their religious objections, but only for two of the 46 workers behind the suit, finding they were the only ones who showed they may have been harmed.

  • March 21, 2024

    DOJ Sues Apple, Rounds Out US Claims Against Tech Big 4

    The U.S. Department of Justice and several state attorneys general on Thursday launched an antitrust suit against Apple, accusing the world's dominant smartphone maker of maintaining an anti-competitive monopoly over its iron grip over the iPhone, rounding out the quartet of long-anticipated government antitrust litigation already proceeding against Google, Meta and Amazon.

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

  • March 20, 2024

    Law360 Announces The Members Of Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is pleased to announce the formation of its 2024 Editorial Advisory Boards.

  • March 20, 2024

    US Chamber's Litigation Funding Concerns Spur 2 State Laws

    Amid concerns from the U.S. Chamber of Commerce about third-party litigation funding, including from potentially hostile foreign entities, state legislatures in Indiana and West Virginia have recently passed bills imposing restrictions on the practice.

  • March 19, 2024

    Potential Bias Taints Mich. Courts, Residents Tell 6th Circ.

    Three Michigan residents urged the Sixth Circuit on Monday to revive their lawsuit alleging unconstitutional bias in Michigan's court system, saying judges sitting on the state's claims court and its appellate court may be unwilling to overrule their colleagues.

  • March 19, 2024

    Bettors' Appeal Over Doped Derby Horse Heard By 6th Circ.

    Bettors on the 2021 Kentucky Derby who did not bet on winner Medina Spirit can't claim negligence or damages in court, even though the horse was later disqualified for failing a drug test, an attorney for Churchill Downs told a Sixth Circuit panel on Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Feds, Mich., City Escape Black Residents' $600M Pollution Case

    A Michigan federal judge has dismissed a $600 million lawsuit brought by Black residents of Kalamazoo claiming a local company, the city, the state and the federal government did nothing about polluted air in their neighborhood because of their race.

Expert Analysis

  • State Regs Sow Discord Between Cannabis, Hemp Industries

    Author Photo

    Connecticut, Maryland and Washington are the latest states choosing to require intoxicating hemp products to comply with the states' recreational marijuana laws, resulting in a widening rift between cannabis and hemp as Congress works on crafting new hemp legislation within the upcoming 2023 Farm Bill, say attorneys at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

    Author Photo

    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

    Author Photo

    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

    Author Photo

    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

    Author Photo

    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

    Author Photo

    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • AGs' Distaste For Food Bill May Signal Other State Issues

    Author Photo

    States' recent opposition to a proposed federal law that would block them from regulating out-of-state agricultural production could affect issues beyond this narrow debate, such as the balance of state and federal regulatory power, reproductive rights post-Dobbs, and energy production and water use, say Christopher Allen and Stephen Cobb at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

    Author Photo

    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Autonomous Vehicles Must Navigate Patchwork Of State Regs

    Author Photo

    With only modest action by the federal government on the autonomous vehicle regulatory front in 2023, states and localities remain the predominant source of new regulations affecting AVs — but the result is a mix of rules that both help and hinder AV development and adoption, say attorneys at Faegre Drinker.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

    Author Photo

    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • Federal Policies Keeping Autonomous Vehicles In Slow Lane

    Author Photo

    In the first installment of this two-part article, attorneys at Faegre Drinker examine recent federal regulations and programs related to autonomous vehicles — and how the federal government's failure to implement a more comprehensive AV regulatory scheme may be slowing the progress of the industry.

  • Calif. Law Tests Noncompete Prohibitions' Potential Reach

    Author Photo

    California’s newly enacted law, which voids employee restrictive covenants, whether signed in or out of the state, has the potential to upend typical agreement negotiations, and highlights ongoing questions concerning how California's worker protections fare in other jurisdictions, says Sarah Tishler at Beck Reed.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

    Author Photo

    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

    Author Photo

    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Michigan archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!