Michigan

  • February 21, 2024

    Auto Giants Can't Pause Neo Tech Patent MDL

    A Michigan federal judge said Tuesday he wouldn't stay multidistrict litigation by Neo Wireless alleging multiple auto companies infringed its in-vehicle cellular technology while the automakers wait for reviews of the underlying patents, saying a pause now would just delay the cases' return to their original courts.

  • February 21, 2024

    Irish Pub Chain's Ex-CFO Gets 1.5 Years For $1M Tax Fraud

    The former chief financial officer of a pub chain with more than a dozen Irish-themed restaurants was sentenced to one and a half years in prison Wednesday by an Ohio federal court for his role in a bookkeeping scheme that defrauded eight states of $1 million in sales taxes.

  • February 21, 2024

    Feds Found Responsible For Leased Building's Contamination

    The Civilian Board of Contract Appeals ruled that the federal government is liable for piscicide contamination of a building long used by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, but is on the hook only for diminished value and not full restoration.

  • February 21, 2024

    Judge Floats Sanctions For Union's 'Bad Faith' Recusal Bid

    A Michigan federal judge won't recuse himself from a defamation case involving two unions after a claim was raised that he expressed bias against the East Coast, instead asking the defendants why sanctions shouldn't be imposed for "bad faith" litigating.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Chamber Urges 6th Circ. To Ax FirstEnergy Class Cert.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission officials and others have urged the Sixth Circuit to reverse class certification in a case accusing FirstEnergy Corp. of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician.

  • February 20, 2024

    Farms Say Workers Haven't Tied Them To Abusive Tactics

    Two agricultural companies look to escape claims that they trafficked a group of migrant workers, telling a Michigan federal court that the workers hadn't shown how they could have known that a recruiter used abusive tactics to obtain their labor.

  • February 20, 2024

    Pot Cos. Say They'll Be Ruined Unless Detroit Facility Opens

    Four cannabis companies have urged a Michigan federal court to prohibit the city of Detroit from taking any action that would impede their $15 million marijuana processing facility from opening, saying they are "in immediate danger of financial ruin" unless they operate the site as planned.

  • February 20, 2024

    Trivest Can Seek 6th Circ. Review Of RICO Jurisdiction Ruling

    A Michigan federal judge will allow a Florida-based private equity firm to appeal a decision denying its bid to escape a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act lawsuit scrutinizing its funding of a solar company accused of scamming customers.

  • February 20, 2024

    Mich. Township Must Face Winery Wedding Ban Suit

    A Michigan federal judge has said he won't dismiss wineries' challenge to a Michigan town's rules limiting their ability to host weddings and other events, saying it would be "unwise" to toss the lawsuit because the wineries are still allegedly experiencing harm from the ordinance.

  • February 20, 2024

    Judge Says He Can Decide If Mich. GOP Chair Was Ousted

    A Michigan state judge said Tuesday that he can resolve whether disputed Michigan Republican Party chair Kristina Karamo was improperly kicked out of office, rejecting her argument that the leadership scuffle was a political issue the courts must steer clear of.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Deny Chinese Co.'s Appeal To Whirlpool Injunction

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday denied a petition from a Chinese company to review a Fifth Circuit decision to temporarily bar it from selling its kitchen stand mixers because Whirlpool Corp. is alleging the products infringe the registered trade dress for its KitchenAid mixers.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Declines To Review Trump Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Tuesday to review onetime Trump lawyer Sidney Powell's and six other attorneys' claims that they were wrongly sanctioned and referred for bar discipline for filing a frivolous challenge to Michigan's 2020 presidential election results.

  • February 16, 2024

    Mayer Brown Denies Knowing Of 'Disturbing' Flint PR Effort

    A Mayer Brown LLP partner representing Veolia North America, the water engineering firm facing negligence claims from children exposed to lead in Flint, Michigan, told a Michigan federal judge Friday that his team didn't know about Veolia's public relations campaign disparaging the children's counsel, a campaign the judge labeled a "disturbing development."

  • February 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects FirstEnergy Objector's Appeal In $180M Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Friday rejected an appeal from a FirstEnergy investor who was holding up a $180 million settlement in a derivative suit seeking to hold the utility company responsible for its involvement in a $1 billion bribery scandal.

  • February 16, 2024

    PTAB To Review Engine Patent After Court Axed It

    The BMW brand has won a decision from the patent board to review the validity of a patented method for calculating the valve timing in a car engine, over half a year after a federal judge in Illinois ruled that the patent failed the U.S. Supreme Court's Alice standard for patent eligibility.

  • February 16, 2024

    Jewish Teacher Says Bias Suit Dismissal Flouted Case Law

    A Jewish middle school teacher who claims she faced unfair treatment at work due to her religion and repercussions for posting on Facebook about an assault by a student has urged a federal judge to rethink an early win granted to her school district against her retaliation and bias claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fired Hospital Worker Can't Keep Fighting PTO Denial

    A maintenance worker who lost an administrative case alleging his ex-employer owed him money for unused paid time off when he was fired cannot try again to get a judgment in state court against the hospital where he worked or Michigan labor regulators, an appellate panel has found.

  • February 16, 2024

    Former Worker Says Supercuts Owner Cut OT Rate Too Short

    A former worker is accusing the owner of about 400 Supercuts, Cost Cutters and Holiday Hair salons in seven states of shortchanging its hourly employees on their compensation by not accounting for commissions and other non-discretionary bonuses in their overtime rate calculations.

  • February 15, 2024

    GM Tells 6th Circ. Unharmed Drivers Can't Be Certified

    General Motors urged the Sixth Circuit on Wednesday to reverse the certification of 26 classes of drivers who allege the automaker sold vehicles with defective transmissions, saying the district court "shirked" its duty to rigorously analyze issues before granting the certification.

  • February 15, 2024

    AGs Press FDA On Safeguards Against Metal In Baby Food

    Attorneys general from states across the country urged the U.S. Food and Drug Administration once again on Thursday to establish requirements that baby food producers test for lead and other metals in products headed for store shelves, citing a recent wave of childhood lead poisoning connected to recalled applesauce pouches.  

  • February 15, 2024

    Michigan Wants 1 Panel For 3 Appeals Of LGBTQ Rights Laws

    The Michigan Civil Rights Commission asked the Sixth Circuit to put three separate appeals brought by religious organizations objecting to the state's laws designating gender identity and sexual orientation as protected classes before the same merits panel, arguing that doing so would ensure judicial consistency.

  • February 15, 2024

    What Rescheduling Pot Would Mean For Criminal Justice Reform

    While federal drug enforcers mull a recommendation from health regulators to loosen restrictions on marijuana, criminal justice reformers are warning that rescheduling the drug would not realize President Joe Biden's campaign promise to decriminalize marijuana.

  • February 15, 2024

    GM Fuel Pump Class Can't Take Second Go At Multistate Cert

    A Michigan federal judge has ruled that drivers alleging General Motors sold them vehicles with faulty fuel pumps cannot toll some of their claims or try for a second round of certifying a multistate class, concluding that the "unusual" request was not supported by case law.

Expert Analysis

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • 6th Circ. Ruling Breathes New Life Into Article III Traceability

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Hardwick v. 3M Co. to vacate a district court's certification of one of the largest class actions in American jurisprudence for lack of Article III standing has potentially broader implications for class action practice in the product liability sphere, particularly in medical monitoring cases involving far-fetched theories of causation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

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    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

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    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

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    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

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    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

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    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • 10 Years Of Retail Battles: Unpacking Pricing Litigation Trends

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    A close look at a decade of pricing class actions against retailers reveals evolving trends, plaintiffs bar strategies, and the effects of significant court decisions across states, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • Employee Experience Strategy Can Boost Law Firm Success

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    Amid continuing business uncertainty, law firms should consider adopting a holistic employee experience strategy — prioritizing consistency, targeting signature moments and leveraging measurement tools — to maximize productivity and profitability, says Haley Revel at Calibrate Consulting.

  • Series

    Competing In Triathlons Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While practicing law and competing in long-distance triathlons can make work and life feel unbalanced at times, participating in the sport has revealed important lessons about versatility, self-care and perseverance that apply to the office as much as they do the racecourse, says Laura Heusel at Butler Snow.

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