Government Contracts

  • March 26, 2024

    Late Navy Lt.'s Dad Says Northrop Lied About Aircraft Safety

    The father of a U.S. Navy lieutenant who died during an aviation training mission alleges Northrop Grumman Corp. lied to the Navy about the safety of its advanced Hawkeye aircraft despite receiving hazard reports on engine failures dating back to 2015.

  • March 26, 2024

    Polsinelli Adds Arnold & Porter Gov't Contracts Shareholder

    Polsinelli PC has added an Arnold & Porter Kaye Scholer LLP partner in Washington, D.C., who focuses his practice on government contracts, procurement law and other related matters, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • March 25, 2024

    Former Next Health Exec Sanctioned For Evidence Slipup

    A Texas federal judge sanctioned a former executive at the scandal-ridden ancillary services company Next Health, but didn't go so far as to level a case-killing default judgment against him, saying that while the plaintiffs lost access to key data, the executive didn't act with bad faith.

  • March 25, 2024

    Ex-LA Official Downplayed Role In Huizar Bribes, Jury Told

    An FBI agent told California federal jurors in former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Raymond Chan's criminal trial Monday that Chan denied facilitating bribes between then-city councilor Jose Huizar and a developer when initially questioned by investigators, despite evidence showing he helped orchestrate Las Vegas trips and loans to help Huizar.

  • March 25, 2024

    SolarWinds Makes Renewed Bid To Toss SEC Cyber Suit

    SolarWinds Corp. has asked a New York federal court to dismiss an amended suit it is facing from the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, saying the agency cites documents that contradict its claims against the government contractor.

  • March 25, 2024

    IHS Fears Budget Cuts Over Tribal Healthcare Funding Case

    Federal government attorneys told the U.S. Supreme Court on Monday that Indian Health Services might be forced to cut its budget by 40% if two Native American tribes prevail in their bids to uphold rulings that ordered they be reimbursed millions in administrative healthcare costs.

  • March 25, 2024

    Wash. Asks Judge To Undo Block Of ICE Detention Center Law

    Washington Gov. Jay Inslee has urged a federal judge to reconsider a recent ruling halting the state from conducting unannounced inspections and imposing new health and safety standards at an immigration detention facility, saying the decision "rests on legal error."

  • March 25, 2024

    DOJ Slammed For Backing GEO Group In Detainee Wage Fight

    A group of immigrant detainees has urged the Ninth Circuit to reject the federal government's stance that a privately run detention center in Tacoma is exempt from Washington's minimum wage, saying the United States has failed to point to any conflicting federal laws.

  • March 25, 2024

    5th Circ. Told Procurement Act Limits Biden's Wage Power

    The Biden administration lacks authority to implement a $15-per-hour minimum wage for government contractors, three Southern states told the Fifth Circuit, because the Procurement Act only empowers the executive branch to trim federal expenditures.

  • March 25, 2024

    DOJ Calls Probe Of Alleged SpaceX Hiring Bias Constitutional

    The U.S. Department of Justice has defended its investigation into allegations that SpaceX refused to hire asylum-seekers and refugees, telling a Texas federal judge that its authority stems from a constitutionally sound provision of federal immigration law barring workplace discrimination based on citizenship status.

  • March 25, 2024

    Texas Judge Extends Stay On Border Wall Funding Order

    A Texas federal judge briefly extended a pause on an injunction directing the Biden administration to use funding Congress appropriated to build physical barriers on the Southwest border for that purpose, as the administration asks for clarification of the order, saying it could otherwise make it hard to build anything.

  • March 25, 2024

    Justices Won't Review 11th Circ. $285M Arbitrator Bias Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to review an Eleventh Circuit decision refusing to vacate $285 million in arbitral awards issued to the operator of the Panama Canal, a case that the petitioners said raised questions about the standard by which courts may nix awards over an arbitrator's "evident partiality."

  • March 22, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortion, Jury Trials And Estate Tax

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear oral arguments this week over the U.S. Food and Drug Administration's decision expanding access to popular abortion pill mifepristone as well as whether juries should determine a defendants' eligibility for repeat offender enhanced sentencing under the Armed Career Criminal Act and how long federal employees have to appeal adverse employment decisions.

  • March 22, 2024

    Watchdog Calls To Redo $896M Migrant Transport Deal

    The U.S. General Services Administration must redo an $896 million contract to transport unaccompanied migrant children, after a federal watchdog determined that the deal was awarded to a company whose proposed contract lead may be unqualified to oversee the contract.

  • March 22, 2024

    Prostitutes, Wiretaps, Payoffs: Key LA RICO Witness Tells All

    A witness in former Los Angeles deputy mayor Ray Chan's racketeering trial testified Friday about trying to boost his high-end cabinetry business by procuring prostitutes for a city council member, paying more than $150,000 in bribes and attempting to give a city official $10,000 at Chan's behest.

  • March 22, 2024

    Justices Asked To Review $36M Sanctions Order In TM Case

    A man who works in the field of marketing and ad copywriting has asked the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a $36 million sanctions order against him and several companies in a trademark case.

  • March 22, 2024

    Boston Soccer Stadium Project Gets Green Light From Judge

    A plan by the city of Boston to turn a stadium inside historic Franklin Park over to a professional women's soccer team can continue moving forward, after a judge on Friday denied a requested injunction to halt it.

  • March 22, 2024

    Colo. City Wins $13.5M For Software Co.'s Trickery

    A Colorado federal judge says a software company that was found to have lied to secure a multimillion project with the city of Fort Collins must pay $13.5 million for the city's costs stemming from its fraud.

  • March 22, 2024

    Judge Cuts ICE Contractor, Keeps US In Medical Abuse Suit

    A Georgia federal judge on Friday left standing only a narrow sliver of class claims against the federal government from immigrant women alleging they underwent invasive, unnecessary medical procedures while in federal custody, dismissing the bulk of their lawsuit.

  • March 22, 2024

    States Say Prez Doesn't Have Power To Hike Contractor Pay

    Four states told the Ninth Circuit that the Biden administration's implementation of a $15-per-hour minimum wage for federal contractors was unlawful, arguing that the government misinterpreted a statement of statutory purpose as a mandate for broad regulatory authority.

  • March 22, 2024

    RTX Loses Second Dispute Over Contract Conflict Of Interest

    A Court of Federal Claims judge has tossed RTX Corp.'s lawsuit alleging it was wrongly excluded from a $54.1 million Navy anti-missile technology contract based on an employee's former Navy job, despite RTX's argument that there was no conflict of interest.

  • March 22, 2024

    Phone Cos., Counties Profit From Jail Visit Bans, Families Say

    Two prison telecommunications service providers have been hit with lawsuits in Michigan state court claiming they worked with jail operators to restrict in-person visits in order to boost their profits from lockup video and phone calls.

  • March 22, 2024

    Calif. Releases Interim Guidelines On GenAI Use

    The state of California on Thursday released interim guidelines for public-sector procurement, uses and training of generative artificial intelligence by state leaders in preparation for all state agencies to consider pilot projects using the technology by July, per Gov. Gavin Newsom's executive order issued last year.

  • March 21, 2024

    LA City Official Ran Secret Consulting Firm, RICO Jury Told

    Former Los Angeles Deputy Mayor Raymond Chan secretly ran an outside real estate consulting firm for years while still employed at City Hall and covertly worked to help get his client's planned $700 million hotel renovation approved, his former business partner testified Thursday at Chan's federal racketeering trial.

  • March 21, 2024

    10th Circ. Doubts Officers Can Get Redo In Training Attack

    A Tenth Circuit panel was skeptical Thursday that tactical officers at a Colorado supermax prison can challenge a trial court's decision not to hold an evidentiary hearing in a suit about a training exercise that turned violent, with one judge noting that the officers did not object at the time.

Expert Analysis

  • HHS Advisory Highlights Free Product Inducement Risks

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    A recent U.S. Department of Health and Human Services advisory opinion highlights concerns that valuable free products and other inducements may influence patients and providers to choose one manufacturer’s product over another, notwithstanding that such free healthcare products may be a benefit, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • Bribery Bill Fills Gap In Foreign Corruption Enforcement

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    Congress recently passed the Foreign Extortion Prevention Act, significantly expanding the U.S. government's ability to prosecute foreign officials who seek or demand bribes, but if enacted, the legislation could also create tension with other nations, say attorneys at Ropes & Gray and Mayer Brown.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: Termination and Accrual

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    Edward Arnold and Bret Marfut at Seyfarth Shaw examine three recent decisions that illustrate why contractors should consider, during the bidding process, impediments to their ability to meet contract requirements, and the need to track the accrual dates of individual claims that may arise during performance to avoid being time-barred.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • 5 Gifts That May Run Afoul Of Government Ethics Rules

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    As the holiday season ramps up, it’s essential to keep in mind that government officials and employees are all subject to specific gift rules, and related violations can lead to consequences far worse than coal in one’s stocking, say Mark Renaud and Rob Walker at Wiley.

  • What DOD Commercial Product Rule Means For Contractors

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    A recent amendment to the Defense Federal Acquisition Regulation Supplement, along with forthcoming changes to the definition of what constitutes a subcontract, will offer some relief for commercial products and services contractors, but the U.S. Department of Defense should do more to reduce regulatory burdens, say Daniel Ramish and Jonathan Shaffer at Haynes Boone.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Inside New Classified Contract Guidance For Joint Ventures

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    A recent Information Security Oversight Office notice clarifies the interplay between small business joint-venture rules and eligibility determinations for U.S. Department of Defense classified contracts, but it's still unclear how this should be interpreted for non-DOD procurements, says Todd Overman at Bass Berry.

  • Opinion

    Giving The Gov't Drug Patent March-In Authority Is Bad Policy

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    The Biden administration's recent proposal to allow government seizure of certain taxpayer-funded drug patents is a terrible idea that would negate the benefits of government-funded research, to the detriment of patients and the wider economy, says Wayne Winegarden at Pacific Research Institute.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Lessons From This Year's Landmark Green Energy IP Clash

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    In this year's Siemens v. General Electric wind turbine patent dispute, a Massachusetts federal court offers a cautionary tale against willful infringement, and highlights the balance between innovation, law and ethics, as legal battles like this become more frequent in the renewable energy sector, say John Powell and Andrew Siuta at Sunstein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

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