Georgia

  • March 29, 2024

    Ga. School District Sanctioned Over Missing Records

    A Georgia federal judge ruled Thursday that a school district should be sanctioned for destroying or failing to preserve records surrounding the 2019 suicide of a middle school student when the district knew it would likely be sued by his family.

  • March 29, 2024

    Atty Called A Flight Risk In $1.3 Billion Tax Fraud Case

    An attorney serving a 23-year prison sentence for tax fraud in a $1.3 billion conservation easement scheme is a flight risk and should remain in federal custody while he waits for his appeal, the government told a Georgia federal court Friday.

  • March 28, 2024

    Trans Officer's Harassment Was 'Severe,' 11th Circ. Says

    The Eleventh Circuit on Thursday revived a lawsuit brought by a transgender correctional officer in Georgia, saying he faced a hostile work environment and that a lower court wrongly determined he didn't experience "severe or pervasive" misgendering harassment by colleagues and supervisors.

  • March 28, 2024

    Special Master Suggests Denying Bid To Toss Gaming IP Row

    A special master in the Northern District of Georgia has recommended denying an attempt to throw out patent infringement and trade secret claims that New York-based sports tech company Vetnos LLC has lodged against Atlanta-based rival PrizePicks.

  • March 28, 2024

    Hard Rock Cafe Workers Score Conditional Cert. In Tip Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has granted conditional class certification to a group of Hard Rock Cafe servers alleging the company forfeited its right to pay servers subminimum tipped wages by compelling them to perform excessive untipped work and not telling them a tip credit would be taken against their wages.

  • March 28, 2024

    Delta Allowed In-Flight Sexual Assault, Passenger Alleges

    Delta Air Lines failed in March to protect a passenger from her seatmate, an off-duty airline employee who has since pled guilty to groping her while she slept, according to a Thursday complaint in Washington state court that alleges flight attendants served the assailant alcohol after he was obviously drunk.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ga. Airbnb Owner Must Face Suit Over Off-Property Injury

    A woman who was injured by a falling limb outside an Airbnb in Savannah, Georgia, has had part of her suit revived by a state appeals court, which found that the rental owner could be liable for the injury because it occurred on an "approach" to his property though not directly on it.

  • March 28, 2024

    Film Producer, 2 Cos. To Pay SEC $3.5M In ICO Scheme

    A Georgia federal judge on Thursday signed off on a $3.5 million penalty levied by the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission against two failed cryptocurrency ventures and the Atlanta film producer who promoted them through a pump-and-dump scheme.

  • March 28, 2024

    Ga. Slams Trump's Speech Claims As Bid To 'Rewrite' Case

    An effort by former President Donald Trump to have his Georgia election interference charges tossed on First Amendment grounds is little more than "an attempt to rewrite the indictment" away from the criminal conspiracy behind his false claims about the 2020 election, prosecutors told a Fulton County judge Thursday.

  • March 28, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms SEC Denial Of Whistleblower Award

    An Eleventh Circuit panel has affirmed the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's denial of a whistleblower award to John Meisel, who argued he was entitled to one after providing the commission with information used to obtain $18 million in judgments against the perpetrators of a Ponzi scheme.

  • March 28, 2024

    Greenberg Traurig Investment Pros Join DLA Piper In Ga., Fla.

    DLA Piper announced Thursday that it has expanded its investment funds practice with three former Greenberg Traurig LLP attorneys, including a partner and of counsel in Atlanta and a senior attorney in Miami.

  • March 28, 2024

    Disbarring Jeffrey Clark Would Chill Gov't Dialogue, Prof Says

    A Yale Law School professor said Thursday that he does not believe former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark should face punishment for advocating to send a letter to Georgia officials purporting to identify significant concerns with the 2020 election, testifying before a Washington, D.C., attorney ethics panel that such discipline would devastate free dialogue within government agencies.

  • March 28, 2024

    Former Prosecutors Among 4 Georgia Judicial Appointments

    Georgia Gov. Brian Kemp announced on Wednesday that he had named a district attorney to serve as a superior court judge, a senior assistant district attorney to serve as a state court judge, and one judge each to the jury division and traffic division in DeKalb County.

  • March 28, 2024

    Fired Alston & Bird Aide Fights Arbitration Of Vax Claims

    An Alston & Bird LLP staffer fired after refusing to get vaccinated for COVID-19 told a Georgia federal court that it should refuse to force her discrimination suit into arbitration, since her employment contract was not a matter of interstate commerce.

  • March 28, 2024

    The Home Depot Buying PE-Backed SRS For $18.25B

    The Home Depot said Thursday it has agreed to acquire SRS Distribution Inc., a private equity-backed distributor of roofing and building supplies, for $18.25 billion, inclusive of debt. 

  • March 27, 2024

    Justices Poised To Expand Repeat Offenders' Jury Trial Rights

    The U.S. Supreme Court appeared likely Wednesday to agree with the Biden administration and the criminal defense bar that repeat offenders have a constitutional right to let a jury decide if past offenses were sufficiently distinct to trigger lengthy prison terms under a prominent sentencing enhancement.

  • March 27, 2024

    Judge Trims Porsche EV Charging Speed Fraud Claims

    A Georgia federal judge has narrowed the scope of a proposed class action that alleges Porsche sold defective chargers for its flagship electric car and then throttled their charging speed to make up for the design weakness, finding the plaintiff's fraud and breach of warranty claims fall short.

  • March 27, 2024

    Eastman Should Be Disbarred, Calif. State Bar Judge Rules

    A State Bar Court of California judge on Wednesday recommended disbarring Donald Trump's onetime attorney John Eastman, who helped plan and promote the former president's strategy to overturn the 2020 presidential election.

  • March 27, 2024

    Foreign Workers Sue Over Alleged Illegal Recruiting Scheme

    An Atlanta-based building materials wholesaler and two recruitment and staffing agencies were hit with a proposed class action alleging they lured skilled Mexican engineers and technicians to the U.S. to fill manual labor positions under a temporary visa program for high-skilled workers.

  • March 27, 2024

    Rosen Tells Ethics Panel Jeffrey Clark Was 'Out Of Bounds'

    Former acting U.S. Attorney General Jeffrey Rosen testified Wednesday that his onetime subordinate, former U.S. Department of Justice attorney Jeffrey Clark, went far beyond the scope of his duties in the final days of the Trump administration, as Clark faces disciplinary charges from a Washington, D.C., attorney ethics panel.

  • March 27, 2024

    11th Circ. Affirms Experian's Win In Credit Reporting Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit has determined a district court didn't err in evidentiary rulings in a case brought by a Florida resident against Experian Information Solutions Inc. alleging it inaccurately reported a discharged mortgage in his credit history, upholding a verdict in favor of the company.

  • March 27, 2024

    Atlanta Firm Wins Fees In Bias Case Over 'Torrent' Of Abuse

    A Georgia federal judge awarded more than $165,000 in attorney fees and more than $33,000 in lost pay to a Black woman who was awarded nearly $3.5 million at trial in November after suffering on-the-job racial and sexual discrimination, harassment and retaliation.

  • March 27, 2024

    Atlanta Immigration Firm Accused Of Not Paying Paralegal OT

    An Atlanta immigration law firm is facing a lawsuit in Georgia federal court from a paralegal who says he was misclassified as an independent contractor and denied overtime pay, despite routinely working upward of 40 hours per week.

  • March 26, 2024

    Suit Over Faulty VA Estimates Came Too Late, Claims Court Says

    A contractor waited too long to sue the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs over faulty ridership estimates for a patient transportation contract, the U.S. Court of Federal Claims said, freeing the department from nearly $10.4 million worth of claims.

  • March 26, 2024

    11th Circ. Considers Reviving Urologist's Sex Bias Suit

    A urologist who alleged gender discrimination led to her removal from the University of Florida's urology department urged the Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday to overturn a district court decision freeing the university and two clinic doctors from claims levied against them in her sex bias suit.

Expert Analysis

  • AI Can Help Lawyers Overcome The Programming Barrier

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    Legal professionals without programming expertise can use generative artificial intelligence to harness the power of automation and other technology solutions to streamline their work, without the steep learning curve traditionally associated with coding, says George Zalepa at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Preparing Law Students For A New, AI-Assisted Legal World

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    As artificial intelligence rapidly transforms the legal landscape, law schools must integrate technology and curricula that address AI’s innate challenges — from ethics to data security — to help students stay ahead of the curve, say Daniel Garrie at Law & Forensics, Ryan Abbott at JAMS and Karen Silverman at Cantellus Group.

  • General Counsel Need Data Literacy To Keep Up With AI

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    With the rise of accessible and powerful generative artificial intelligence solutions, it is imperative for general counsel to understand the use and application of data for myriad important activities, from evaluating the e-discovery process to monitoring compliance analytics and more, says Colin Levy at Malbek.

  • Young Thug Case Spotlights Debate Over Lyric Admissibility

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    A Georgia court’s recent ruling, allowing prosecutors to use some of rapper Young Thug’s lyrics in his conspiracy trial, captures the ongoing debate about whether rap lyrics are admissible, with courts often stretching the boundaries of the federal evidence rules, say Amy Buice at Smith Gambrell and Emily Ward at Continuum Legal Group.

  • A Look At Successful Bid Protests In FY 2023

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    Attorneys at Sheppard Mullin look beyond the statistics in the U.S. Government Accountability Office’s recent annual report on bid protests, sharing their insights about nine categories of sustained protests, gained from reading every fiscal year 2023 decision in which the protester had a positive result.

  • Navigating Discovery Of Generative AI Information

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools become increasingly ubiquitous, companies must make sure to preserve generative AI data when there is reasonable expectation of litigation, and to include transcripts in litigation hold notices, as they may be relevant to discovery requests, say Nick Peterson and Corey Hauser at Wiley.

  • Finding Focus: Strategies For Attorneys With ADHD

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    Given the prevalence of ADHD among attorneys, it is imperative that the legal community gain a better understanding of how ADHD affects well-being, and that resources and strategies exist for attorneys with this disability to manage their symptoms and achieve success, say Casey Dixon at Dixon Life Coaching and Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Questions Awaiting Justices In 'Repugnant' Verdicts Hearing

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    In McElrath v. Georgia, the U.S. Supreme Court will decide whether the double jeopardy clause bars retrial when a jury reaches a so-called repugnant, or logically contradictory, verdict — with the ultimate resolution resting on how this narrow issue is framed, say Brook Dooley and Cody Gray at Keker Van Nest.

  • How Justices Could Rule On A Key Copyright Statute

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    Attorneys at Manatt discuss how the U.S. Supreme Court may choose to address a fundamental accrual issue in Warner Chappell Music v. Nealy, which precedents the court may look to in analyzing the issue and the challenges copyright claimants may face going forward.

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 1st Tax Easement Convictions Will Likely Embolden DOJ, IRS

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    After recent convictions in the first criminal tax fraud trial over allegedly abusive syndicated conservation easements, the IRS and U.S. Department of Justice will likely pursue other promoters for similar alleged conspiracies — though one acquittal may help attorneys better evaluate their clients' exposure, say Bill Curtis and Lauren DeSantis-Then at Polsinelli.

  • The Self-Funded Plan's Guide To Gender-Affirming Coverage

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    Self-funded group health plans face complicated legal risks when determining whether to cover gender-affirming health benefits for their transgender participants, so plan sponsors should carefully weigh how federal nondiscrimination laws and state penalties for providing care for trans minors could affect their decision to offer coverage, say Tim Kennedy and Anne Tyler Hall at Hall Benefits Law.

  • Lenders Must Prep For Ga. Commercial Financing Disclosures

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    Since Georgia’s new commercial financing disclosure requirements may be a lender's first foray into complicated Truth-In-Lending-Act-style laws, providers should work with investor counterparties to prepare early disclosures, in compliance with statutory tolerances, for borrowers whose loan agreements take effect Jan. 1, says Melissa Richards at Buchalter.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • Ga. Ruling A Win For Plaintiffs Injured By Older Products

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    The Georgia Supreme Court's recent opinion in Ford Motor Co. v. Cosper gives plaintiffs the assurance that even if they are injured by older products, they can still bring claims under state law if the manufacturer used a design that it knew, or should have known, created a risk of substantial harm, says Rob Snyder at Cannella Snyder.

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