Florida

  • February 21, 2024

    Miami Heat Player Sued After Man's Leg Amputated In Crash

    A Florida man has brought a state court lawsuit alleging negligence against Miami Heat forward Haywood Highsmith Jr., saying his leg was partially amputated as a result of a vehicle crash caused by the professional basketball player earlier this month.

  • February 21, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Sotheby's Insured For Fla. Agent Theft Row

    An Eleventh Circuit panel affirmed Wednesday that an insurer must defend One Sotheby's International Realty against allegations that its agent bamboozled married Russian investors into selling their Miami Beach-area condo at below market value, eventually stealing $3.7 million in sale proceeds.

  • February 21, 2024

    Messner Reeves Accused Of Losing Client's $700K Deposit

    Colorado-based Messner Reeves LLP is being sued in California state court by a Florida financing consultant that claims the firm failed to protect a $700,000 interest deposit it made as part of a client's business loan.

  • February 21, 2024

    Broker Defends Claims Against Suns Owner, Mortgage Co.

    A mortgage broker pushed back against a report recommending that a Florida federal court toss its antitrust case against the owner of the NBA's Phoenix Suns and his company United Wholesale Mortgage, saying the analysis of its conspiracy claims included several errors.

  • February 21, 2024

    Holland & Knight Adds Jones Walker Real Estate Atty In Miami

    Holland & Knight LLP announced it has brought on a former Jones Walker LLP attorney as a partner for its real estate capital markets team in Miami.

  • February 21, 2024

    Fla. Court Says BJ's Doesn't Fall Under Fuel Price Law

    A Florida appeals court ruled Wednesday that a state law banning the predatory below-cost sale of gas to the "motoring public" does not apply to membership clubs like BJ's Wholesale Club Inc. that sell gas only to members.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bankrupt Co. Stole $100M In Special Needs Trusts, Suit Says

    The parents of a disabled child claim the founders and financial entities behind a now-bankrupt corporate trustee orchestrated a decadelong predatory scheme to misappropriate more than $100 million of special needs trust assets, according to a proposed class action filed Monday in Florida federal court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ryder Investors' $45M Securities Deal Gets First Green Light

    A Florida federal judge on Tuesday granted the first green light to a $45 million cash settlement ending a suit against truck rental company Ryder System Inc., alleging it knowingly overstated the residual value of its trucking fleet, which caused its stock price to plummet after the truth was revealed.

  • February 20, 2024

    11th Circ. Tosses Appeal Of Bid-Rigging Indictment

    The Eleventh Circuit on Tuesday found that a concrete executive has to wait until after he's tried to contest his indictment by a remotely convened grand jury during the pandemic on charges of allegedly fixing prices and rigging bids for ready-mix concrete in Georgia.

  • February 20, 2024

    Restoration Architect Says Visa Denial Ignored Evidence

    A Colombian restoration architect who wants to address the affordable housing shortage in the U.S., accused immigration officials in Florida federal court of disregarding more than 1,000 pages of evidence in denying him a national interest waiver for a visa.

  • February 20, 2024

    Trivest Can Seek 6th Circ. Review Of RICO Jurisdiction Ruling

    A Michigan federal judge will allow a Florida-based private equity firm to appeal a decision denying its bid to escape a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act lawsuit scrutinizing its funding of a solar company accused of scamming customers.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fla. Cities, Local Electeds Sue Over New Financial Disclosures

    A group of 26 Florida municipalities and 74 elected officials have sued the state, challenging a new law requiring municipal elected officials to file a more detailed financial disclosure form that they say is "highly intrusive" and requires making public private financial information unrelated to their duties.

  • February 20, 2024

    DC Circ. Says FERC Fight Over 'Onshore' Meaning Is Moot

    The D.C. Circuit has dumped a fight between the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission and an advocacy group concerning whether the agency has jurisdiction over facilities that transport liquefied natural gas to port via truck, saying the dispute is moot because the proposed facility in question isn't being built.

  • February 20, 2024

    Tennis Organization Found Negligent In Pro's Sexual Assault

    A Florida federal judge has sided with tennis pro Kylie McKenzie, finding that the U.S. Tennis Association did not do enough to monitor her coach Anibal Aranda, who sexually assaulted her.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Microsoft's PTAB Win Over 3D Patents

    The Patent Trial and Appeal Board properly invalidated a pair of 3D medical imaging patents challenged by Microsoft, the Federal Circuit affirmed Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    GOP Sens. Seek Full Impeachment Trial For Mayorkas

    A group of Senate Republicans made the case on Tuesday that their constitutional duty compels them to hold a full impeachment trial for Alejandro Mayorkas, secretary of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, despite reservations from other Republicans in the Democrat-led Senate.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Accused Of Aiding FTX Fraud

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has been accused of knowing about and helping facilitate the massive fraud that brought down cryptocurrency exchange FTX while serving as FTX's outside counsel, and profiting on the back end by overseeing FTX's ongoing bankruptcy, according to a racketeering lawsuit filed last week.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Give Feds Time In Texas, Fla. Social Media Law Fights

    The U.S. Supreme Court has set aside time for the federal government to weigh in on looming oral arguments in cases to determine the constitutionality of controversial Texas and Florida laws that restrict social media companies' ability to curb users' speech.

  • February 16, 2024

    Fla. Bills Limiting Toxic Tort Damages Headed To Floor

    Two business-backed bills that could sharply limit the ability of toxic tort victims to recover damages from polluters who violate their permits are poised to hit the floors of both houses of the Florida Legislature, despite concerns that they could embolden polluters and leave certain claimants — like commercial fishing operators — without remedy.

  • February 16, 2024

    Meet The Attys Arguing Copyright Damages Row At Top Court

    The attorneys who will face off before the U.S. Supreme Court on Wednesday in a copyright dispute that could expand the timeline for available damages are both well-respected appellate litigators who have spent plenty of time in the spotlight of big cases.

  • February 16, 2024

    Family Of 23-Year-Old Who Died From Ulcer Gets $30M

    A Florida state jury awarded $30 million to the family of a 23-year-old woman who died from an untreated ulcer at a Tampa hospital after finding the two doctors entrusted with her care liable for negligence.

  • February 16, 2024

    The Congressman Who Reps Cannabis Reform On Capitol Hill

    Rep. Earl Blumenauer speaks to Law360 about the prospects for Congress enacting marijuana reform, why he supports moving cannabis to Schedule III and some of the drug policy triumphs and setbacks in his home state of Oregon.

  • February 16, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Deadlines, Delivery Drivers & Smog

    The U.S. Supreme Court will be closed Monday for Presidents Day and will begin a short oral argument week on Tuesday, during which the justices will consider the deadlines for challenging a federal agency's action and bringing copyright infringement claims.

  • February 16, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    News broke last week that Delaware's Court of Chancery will say goodbye to its current longest-serving jurist, a development that quickly overshadowed a busy week of new merger and board disputes, fee rulings, settlements, and books-and-records demands.

  • February 16, 2024

    Florida Loses Wetland Permitting Authority In D.C. Court Case

    A D.C. judge has stripped Florida of its federally delegated authority to permit wetlands development, ruling that U.S. environmental regulators failed to analyze the impact of their decision on endangered and threatened species and handing a victory to conservation groups challenging the program.

Expert Analysis

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Legislative And Litigation Trends In Environmental Advertising

    Author Photo

    Companies that tout their products' environmental benefits can significantly reduce the risk that they will face allegations of greenwashing by staying up to date on related Federal Trade Commission guidance, state requirements and litigation trends, say Raqiyyah Pippins and Kelsie Sicinski at Arnold & Porter.

  • Preparing For DOJ's Data Analytics Push In FCPA Cases

    Author Photo

    After the U.S. Department of Justice’s recent announcement that it will leverage data analytics in Foreign Corrupt Practice Act investigations and prosecutions, companies will need to develop a compliance strategy that likewise implements data analytics to get ahead of enforcement risks, say attorneys at Cozen O'Connor.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

    Author Photo

    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • EDNY Ruling Charts 99 Problems In Rap Lyric Admissibility

    Author Photo

    A New York federal court’s recent ruling in U.S. v. Jordan powerfully captures courts’ increasing skepticism about the admissibility of rap lyrics as evidence in criminal trials, particularly at a time when artists face economic incentives to embrace fictional, hyperbolic narratives, say attorneys at Sher Tremonte.

  • Series

    Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • Reimagining Law Firm Culture To Break The Cycle Of Burnout

    Author Photo

    While attorney burnout remains a perennial issue in the legal profession, shifting post-pandemic expectations mean that law firms must adapt their office cultures to retain talent, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

    Author Photo

    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

    Author Photo

    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • 1869 Case May Pave Off-Ramp For Justices In Trump DQ Fight

    Author Photo

    In deciding whether former President Donald Trump is disqualified from Colorado's Republican primary ballots, the U.S. Supreme Court could rely on due process principles articulated in a Reconstruction-era case to avert a chaotic or undemocratic outcome, says Gordon Renneisen at Cornerstone Law Group.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Djerassi On Super Bowl 52

    Author Photo

    Philadelphia Court of Common Pleas Judge Ramy Djerassi discusses how Super Bowl 52, in which the Philadelphia Eagles prevailed over the New England Patriots, provides an apt metaphor for alternative dispute resolution processes in commercial business cases.

  • Black-Led VC Fund Case Could Hinge On Nature Of Grants

    Author Photo

    Organizations whose missions involve any manner of race-conscious funding should closely monitor arguments this week in American Alliance v. Fearless Fund, a case filed against a grant program that seeks to address the gap in venture capital funding for Black women-led businesses, which will examine whether grants are charitable under Civil Rights Act Section 1981 liability, say Kali Schellenberg and John Stapleton at LeVan Stapleton, and Kenneth Trujillo at Chamberlain Hrdlicka.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!