Employment

  • April 03, 2024

    NLRB Defends Urging Calif. Court To Defy 5th Circ. In SpaceX

    The National Labor Relations Board's suggestion that a California federal court should keep a transferred constitutional challenge from SpaceX even after the Fifth Circuit reversed the transfer was an act of "zealous advocacy" for itself, the board said Wednesday, responding to urgent questions from the appeals panel.

  • April 03, 2024

    UMich Says Law Prof's FMLA Leave Can't Prevent Discipline

    The University of Michigan told a federal judge Wednesday that a law professor's need for medical leave did not mean administrators couldn't discipline her for allegedly walking out on certain teaching responsibilities, rebutting her claims that the university's actions were because of her race or gender.

  • April 03, 2024

    9th Circ. Doubts Kosher Tester's Religious Carveout Challenge

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Wednesday seemed skeptical of a worker's argument that the ministerial exception does not apply to his suit accusing an Orthodox Jewish organization of failing to pay him overtime for his work making sure grapes used for wines were kept kosher.

  • April 03, 2024

    Bank Wraps Up Ex-VP's Age Discrimination Suit

    A community bank reached an agreement with a former senior vice president to end his age bias lawsuit accusing the bank of forcing him into a rigorous interview process and then replacing him with someone 20 years his junior, the parties told a Florida federal court Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    BlackBerry Fired Worker Harassed By Executive, Suit Says

    BlackBerry swept away a former employee's allegations that an executive sexually harassed her and then fired her to make way for his ascension to CEO, according to a complaint filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • April 03, 2024

    Groups Fight DOL's Bid To Toss Suit Challenging Wage Rule

    A pair of construction industry trade groups urged a Texas federal court to preserve their challenge to a U.S. Department of Labor rule that revises prevailing wage calculations for federally funded projects, arguing that the rule injures both them and the firms they represent.

  • April 03, 2024

    Joonko Tells Chancery Ex-CEO Shouldn't Get Legal Fees

    Defunct job board startup Joonko, which closed last year after its CEO resigned amid fraud allegations, told Delaware's Court of Chancery on Wednesday that it has no obligation to advance her defense costs in federal government investigations because she is no longer a director or officer of the company.

  • April 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Judge Wonders If Philly Union Rule Dispute Is Moot

    A Third Circuit judge on Wednesday wondered whether a former Philadelphia mayor's order requiring contractors to pay dues to "city-approved" unions was now moot, given the new administration's assurances that it won't be implemented, as contractors urged the court to find that the scrapped rule should be banned by law.

  • April 03, 2024

    Hospital Workers' Vax Free Speech Suit Falls Flat At 6th Circ.

    The Sixth Circuit backed the dismissal of two workers' claims that a children's hospital violated their constitutional rights when it rejected their religious objections to a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, saying Wednesday they failed to show the hospital was a government actor.

  • April 03, 2024

    14 AGs Urge DOL To Seek More Payroll Info From Contractors

    Contractors performing construction, alteration or repair work on government buildings should have to give the U.S. Department of Labor more detailed information about the deductions they take from workers' wages, a coalition of Democratic state attorneys general told the agency in a letter publicized Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    Cannabis Cos. Agree To Proposed Deal In Workers' Wage Suit

    A New Mexico federal judge has given preliminary approval to a $525,000 deal that would end a cannabis-employee-led lawsuit accusing dispensary owners of taking a large portion of tips meant for retail workers and giving them to store managers and supervisors.

  • April 03, 2024

    Auto Insurer Seeks Payback After $2M Car Crash Settlement

    A business insurer of a man who crashed a rental car into a motorcyclist while working in Los Angeles should pay something in connection with a $2 million settlement with the injured biker, an auto insurer told a California federal court, seeking to recoup its expenses.

  • April 03, 2024

    Ex-NFL Player's Disability Benefits Suit Tossed As Too Late

    A Florida federal judge threw out a suit from a former NFL player who said fraud made him miss out on the disability benefits he was owed, ruling he missed the deadline to challenge the decision that lowered his payments.

  • April 03, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Backs Firing IRS Agent Who Golfed On Agency Time

    A former senior appraiser for the Internal Revenue Service was appropriately fired for golfing on company time, a federal appeals court affirmed Wednesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ye Spewed Anti-Jewish And LGBTQ Hate, Fired Worker Says

    Rapper Ye, his companies and Donda Academy were hit with a discrimination suit in California state court Tuesday by a former employee who accuses Ye of threatening to cage students, spewing hateful rhetoric against Jewish people and the LGBTQ community, and treating Black employees far worse than white staffers.

  • April 02, 2024

    Northwestern Must Face Fired Football Coach's $130M Suit

    An Illinois state judge refused Tuesday to dismiss fired Northwestern University football coach Pat Fitzgerald's $130 million contract breach suit alleging he was terminated without cause amid a monthslong probe into hazing allegations, teeing up the case for trial in April 2025.

  • April 02, 2024

    3rd Circ. Preview: Black Lung, Back Pay On Tap In April

    The Third Circuit this month will consider Keystone Coal Mining Co.'s contention that a lower court erred in deeming a miner's black lung a "total disability," while a shuttered rehabilitation facility has asked the court to undo the National Labor Relations Board's determination that it owes unionized employees back pay and bonuses for work done during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ga. Judge Tosses Ex-Police Chief's Retaliation Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has freed the city of Austell from a lawsuit brought against it by its former police chief, who alleged that he was forced out of his job after three years of raising concerns about the safety of department facilities.

  • April 02, 2024

    'Road Not Taken': Uber Defends Verdict With Poetic Flair

    Making reference to Robert Frost's poem "The Road Not Taken," Uber Technologies Inc. on Monday said a group of UberBlack drivers chose their road when they urged a Pennsylvania federal court to consider less than a unanimous verdict, and could not turn back around when the jurors leaned toward declaring them independent contractors.

  • April 02, 2024

    2 More Poultry Cos. Settle Wage-Fixing Suit

    Poultry processing workers sought preliminary approval Monday for deals with Case Foods Inc. and Mountaire Farms totaling $22 million that would make the companies the 10th and 11th wage-fixing defendants to settle out of a broader Maryland federal court case where total payouts reach $217.25 million.

  • April 02, 2024

    Transportation Department Finalizes New Train Crew Size Rule

    The U.S. Department of Transportation's Federal Railroad Administration on Tuesday finalized a rule requiring freight trains to be operated with at least two people, forging ahead with a mandate long supported by rail workers' unions and safety advocates, but one that major rail carriers have decried as unnecessary and costly.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ex-Army Officer Says Gov't Smeared Him With False Claims

    A former major general in the U.S. Army on Tuesday sued the U.S. Department of Defense and others, alleging that the government wrongly recorded him as having assaulted his partner, despite her recanting the allegations and admitting they were a ploy to seek attention.

  • April 02, 2024

    Security Guard Co. Settles DOJ's Immigration Bias Probe

    Nationwide security guard company Securitas Security Services USA Inc. has agreed to pay $175,000 to resolve investigations into its hiring practices that the U.S. Department of Justice was conducting after it received a complaint that the firm was discriminating against non-U.S. citizens, the government announced Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    ZeniMax Escapes Trans Ex-Worker's Coverage Denial Suit

    A Maryland federal judge granted video game developer ZeniMax's bid to toss a transgender ex-employee's suit claiming the business didn't uphold promises it would continue her health coverage after she left the company because of harassment, saying she didn't show that federal benefits laws were violated.

  • April 02, 2024

    Truckers Reach $2.5M Deal On Sleeper Berth Claim

    A transportation company and its subsidiary said they won't challenge a First Circuit ruling that time long-haul truckers spend in sleeper berths is compensable, agreeing to shell out a $2.5 million judgment on top of an already approved $12.5 million deal.

Expert Analysis

  • Grant Compliance Takeaways From Ga. Tech's FCA Settlement

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    Georgia Tech’s recent False Claims Act settlement over its failure to detect compliance shortcomings in a grant program was unique in that it involved a voluntary repayment of funds prior to the resolution, offering a few key lessons for universities receiving research funding from the government, says Jonathan Porter at Husch Blackwell.

  • Series

    Competing In Dressage Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My lifelong participation in the sport of dressage — often called ballet on horses — has proven that several skills developed through training and competition are transferable to legal work, especially the ability to harness focus, persistence and versatility when negotiating a deal, says Stephanie Coco at V&E.

  • Deferral Pointers For Employers After $700M Ohtani Deal

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    Darren Goodman and Christine Osvald-Mruz at Lowenstein Sandler examine the legal consequences of Shohei Ohtani's $700 million, 10-year contract with the Los Angeles Dodgers — a high-profile example of nonqualified deferred compensation — and offer lessons for employers of all sizes interested in similar deals.

  • Employer Lessons From Nixed Calif. Arbitration Agreement

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    A California state appeals court’s recent decision to throw out an otherwise valid arbitration agreement, where an employee claimed a confusing electronic signature system led her to agree to unfair terms, should alert employers to scrutinize any waivers or signing procedures that may appear to unconscionably favor the company, say Guillermo Tello and Monique Eginli at Clark Hill.

  • EEO-1 Ruling May Affect Other Gov't Agency Disclosures

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    By tightly construing a rarely litigated but frequently asserted term, a California federal court’s ruling that the Freedom of Information Act does not exempt reports to the U.S. Department of Labor on workplace demographics could expand the range of government contractor information susceptible to public disclosure, says John Zabriskie at Foley & Lardner.

  • Musk Pay Package Ruling Offers Detailed Lesson On Del. Law

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    Anat Alon-Beck and John Livingstone at Case Western Reserve University discuss the specifics that led Delaware's chancellor to rescind Elon Musk's $55.8 billion Tesla pay package on Jan. 30, how the state’s entire fairness doctrine played into the ruling, and its bigger-picture impact on the executive compensation landscape.

  • What's At Stake In High Court NLRB Injunction Case

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    William Baker at Wigdor examines the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision to hear Starbucks v. McKinney — where it will consider a long-standing circuit split over the standard for evaluating National Labor Relations Board injunction bids — and explains why the justices’ eventual decision, either way, is unlikely to be a significant blow to labor.

  • The Legal Industry Needs A Cybersecurity Paradigm Shift

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    As law firms face ever-increasing risks of cyberattacks and ransomware incidents, the legal industry must implement robust cybersecurity measures and privacy-centric practices to preserve attorney-client privilege, safeguard client trust and uphold the profession’s integrity, says Ryan Paterson at Unplugged.

  • The State Of Play In NIL, Compensation For Student-Athletes

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    Recent NCAA developments — including name, image, and likeness legislation and a governance and compensation proposal — reflect a shift from the initial hands-off approach to student-athletes' NIL deals and an effort to allow colleges to directly compensate student-athletes without categorizing them as employees, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 5 Reasons Associates Shouldn't Take A Job Just For Money

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    As a number of BigLaw firms increase salary scales for early-career attorneys, law students and lateral associates considering new job offers should weigh several key factors that may matter more than financial compensation, say Albert Tawil at Lateral Hub and Ruvin Levavi at Power Forward.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • New SDNY Whistleblower Program May Be A Game-Changer

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    A new pilot program in the U.S. Attorney’s Office for the Southern District of New York promises to immunize from prosecution certain individuals who blow the whistle on financial crimes and corruption, and if similar self-disclosure programs are any indication, this significant new policy may measurably increase white collar investigations, say attorneys at Paul Hastings.

  • Directors And Officers Face Unique AI-Related Risks

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    As privacy, intellectual property and discrimination lawsuits focusing on artificial intelligence increase, corporate directors and officers must stay aware of associated risks, including those related to compliance, litigation and cybersecurity, says Jonathan Meer at Wilson Elser.

  • Series

    Playing Competitive Tennis Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My experience playing competitive tennis has highlighted why prioritizing exercise and stress relief, maintaining perspective under pressure, and supporting colleagues in pursuit of a common goal are all key aspects of championing a successful legal career, says Madhumita Datta at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • Best Employer Practices Under Whistleblower Protection Act

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The Whistleblower Protection Act provides important protections for employees who report wrongdoing in the federal government, and employers should take steps to ensure compliance with the WPA, as these protections are essential to promoting a workplace culture of ethics and accountability, says Emory Moore at Honigman.

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