Employment UK

  • March 21, 2024

    Women 'Owed' Compensation Over State Pension Failings

    Women who were affected by the U.K. government's failure to inform them that their retirement age had changed are owed compensation for the state's failings, according to a much-anticipated report released Thursday by the parliamentary ombudsman.

  • March 21, 2024

    British Safety Council Calls For A Minister For Well-Being

    The British Safety Council has urged the government to appoint a well-being minister to promote welfare in the workplace at a time when illness is at a 10-year high and recent surveys suggest high stress levels and burnout among workers.

  • March 21, 2024

    ECJ Adviser Rejects Taxing Foreign Pension Funds Differently

    Taxing dividends paid to foreign public pension funds while exempting dividends paid to the source country's general retirement savings funds contravenes European Union law, an adviser to the bloc's highest court said Thursday, backing Finnish pension funds' challenge of a Swedish law.

  • March 20, 2024

    UK Pension Fraud Fund To Pay Out £416M To Victims By 2026

    The U.K.'s pension lifeboat scheme said Wednesday it expects to pay up to £416.7 million ($530 million) in compensation to members of pension schemes that have been hit by scams.

  • March 20, 2024

    Health And Safety Top Risk For Directors, Global Survey Says

    Health and safety is the top risk for directors and officers worldwide, according to a survey published Wednesday, in a "surprise" result partly attributed to the lingering impact of the COVID-19 pandemic on businesses and increasing mental health considerations.

  • March 20, 2024

    UK Gov't Dept And Lawyer Sued For 'Gender Critical' Network

    A lawyer working for the British government has said she is being sued for making "gender critical" comments, including saying that "only women menstruate."

  • March 20, 2024

    Anti-Vax Vegan Loses Work Claim Against Ambulance Service

    An ambulance worker who refused to get the COVID-19 vaccine because of his vegan beliefs has lost his discrimination claim after an employment tribunal ruled he was legally required to be vaccinated to work with vulnerable patients.

  • March 20, 2024

    Teacher Wins £39K After Rate Cut In Zero-Hours Contract

    An English language teacher has won £39,200 ($49,900) after she successfully claimed that being moved on to a zero-hours contract forced her to quit.

  • March 20, 2024

    Union Organizer Loses Holiday, COVID Hours Claim

    A union organizer suspended for three years during the coronavirus pandemic cannot claim that he did not receive holiday pay because he did not request to carry his unused days forward, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • March 20, 2024

    Employers' EDI Efforts 'Ineffective And Polarizing,' Gov't Says

    British employers "want to do the right thing" but are implementing equality, diversity and inclusion initiatives in an ineffective, polarizing and potentially unlawful way, according to a report released by the government on Wednesday.

  • March 20, 2024

    UK Insurers See Boom In Income Protection Policies

    The number of people who took out personal insurance cover to shield their finances hit a record high in 2023, as more sought protection from a potentially serious accident or illness that would prevent them from working, British insurers said Wednesday.

  • March 20, 2024

    HMRC Makes U-Turn On Helpline Cuts After Backlash

    The U.K. tax authority backtracked Wednesday on plans to close down several helplines for taxpayers from April through September after facing criticism from politicians and industry groups.

  • March 20, 2024

    FCA Warns Pension Advisers Over Treatment Of Customers

    The Financial Conduct Authority urged pension advisers on Wednesday to look at how well they are considering the needs of their clients after a sweeping review of the sector found significant shortfalls at some companies.

  • March 19, 2024

    British Gas Beats Claim That It Paid Off Staff To Avoid Talks

    British Gas did not break U.K. labor laws when it made a direct offer to over 3,000 engineers amid collective bargaining because it did not realize that negotiations were still ongoing, a tribunal said Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Criminal Case No Excuse For Missing Tribunal Claim Deadline

    A customer service worker for a British train company can't pursue his sex discrimination and unfair dismissal claims against his former employer because he missed the deadline to bring legal action while on trial for sexual assault allegations brought by a colleague.

  • March 19, 2024

    Pension Watchdog Finds Trustee Boards Lack Diversity

    Pension boards across the U.K. lack diversity, according to research published Tuesday by Britain's retirement savings watchdog, which showed the characteristics of a "typical trustee" being unrepresentative of the overall U.K. population.

  • March 19, 2024

    HMRC Under Fire For Sharply Cutting Back Helpline Service

    The U.K. tax authority has moved too quickly to phase out helpline services for taxpayers filing self-assessment returns this year, members of Parliament said Tuesday.

  • March 19, 2024

    Charities Recovering From Pension Deficits

    Thirteen U.K. charities are no longer plugging a black hole in their pension schemes, a consultancy said Tuesday, amid a wider improvement in funding for retirement savings plans.

  • March 19, 2024

    Gov't Had 'No Option' But To Fire Worker Over Welfare Fraud

    A civil servant at the Department for Work and Pensions cannot claim he was unfairly dismissed after he used his position to process personal claims for universal credit knowing he wasn't eligible, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • March 19, 2024

    Workers Have 'Misplaced' £50B In UK Pension Pots

    The growing number of young workers changing jobs and moving to different pensions providers has left more than £50 billion ($64 billion) in U.K. pension pots "at risk of being misplaced" in abandoned or lost accounts, according to analysis published on Tuesday.

  • March 18, 2024

    Activist Was Harassment Whistleblower, Tribunal Rules

    An employee at a bottling company counts as a whistleblower because he told his employer he had witnessed a senior manager inappropriately massage a junior employee, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • March 18, 2024

    Axed HMRC Staffer Wins £16K Disability Discrimination Case

    HM Revenue and Customs must pay a disabled former employee £15,900 ($20,200) after it unfairly sacked him for gross misconduct and wrote off his claim that his sleep apnea was to blame, a Scottish tribunal has ruled.

  • March 18, 2024

    Barrister Before Tribunal For Allegedly Dodging Practice Ban

    An English legal regulator told a tribunal on Monday that a suspended barrister had continued to practice under the pretense of being a "solicitor's agent" in order to sidestep a ban for sending hostile emails and making false statements to a judge.

  • March 18, 2024

    PA Unfairly Pushed To Quit Over Underground COVID Fears

    A trader unfairly forced his personal assistant to quit after demanding that she continue to work at his house despite her concerns about catching COVID-19 on the London Underground, an appeals tribunal has ruled.

  • March 18, 2024

    UK Pension Insurers Sign Up To Net-Zero Targets

    The bulk annuities insurance sector in Britain has universally adopted net-zero targets for carbon emissions, but analysts warn that there is still more to do in terms of climate stewardship.

Expert Analysis

  • Employment Tribunal Data Offers Workplace Practice Insights

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    A breakdown of the Ministry of Justice's recent Employment Tribunal figures shows shifting trends among employees, and potential challenges and possible improvement areas for employers, and if the data continues to be published, it could play an essential part in clearing the fast-growing backlog of tribunal matters, says Gemma Clark at Wright Hassall.

  • Unpacking The Rwanda Policy Appeal Decision

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    The Court of Appeal recently declared the U.K. government's Rwanda policy unlawful in AAA v. Secretary of State, but given that this was only on the basis that Rwanda is not currently a safe third country, it is possible that the real risk of Article 3 of the European Convention on Human Rights breaches will be obviated, says Alex Papasotiriou at Richmond Chambers.

  • Opinion

    Why Menstrual Leave Policies May Be Counterproductive

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    Efforts to introduce U.K. standards on leave for menstruation, which in practice has been narrowly applied, may be distracting focus from pay gap and family rights laws, and robust sick leave policies that may be more relevant to tackling gender equality in the workplace, say Sean Nesbitt and Sophie Davidson at Taylor Wessing.

  • Opinion

    UK Noncompete Cap Will Not Grow Business As Intended

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    The U.K. government's recent response to its 2020 consultation on restrictive covenants has not given any obvious consideration to the position of employers, as there is no evidence supporting its proposition that limiting noncompetes to three months will assist recruitment and help employees find new jobs at often higher pay, says David Whincup at Squire Patton.

  • Workplace Neurotech Requires A Balance Of Risk And Reward

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    The U.K. Information Commissioner's Office's recently released a report on neurotech, and while such technologies could unlock a stubbornly low productivity stagnation, they pose employer data compliance questions and potential employee discrimination risks, say Ingrid Hesselbo and Ben Milloy at Fladgate.

  • ITV Scandal Offers Important Considerations On HR Policies

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    The recent resignation of former ITV host Phillip Schofield after admitting to an affair with a younger staff member raises questions on employers' duty of care and highlights the need for not only having the right internal policies in place but also understanding and applying them, says Hina Belitz at Excello Law.

  • What The Italian Whistleblowing Decree Means For Employers

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    The new Italian whistleblowing decree, guidelines to which must be adopted by authorities this week, represents a major milestone in protecting employees by broadening employers' obligations, and it is essential that multinational companies with an interest in Italy verify their compliance with the more stringent requirements, say lawyers at Studio Legale Chiomenti.

  • What TPR's Guidance On DEI Means For Pensions Industry

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    The Pension Regulator is one of the first regulators to issue guidance on equality, diversity and inclusion, and employers and trustees should incorporate its advice by developing policies and monitoring progress to ensure that improvements are made regularly, say lawyers at Linklaters.

  • 10 Tips On Drafting A Company Code Of Ethics

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    In light of a recent report that less than 50% of companies on the FTSE 250 and 350 indexes have a code of ethics, it is clear that more organizations should be informed of the reasons for having one, like reducing risk and solidifying commitment to integrity, and how to implement it, says Shiv Haria-Shah at Fieldfisher.

  • Breaking Down Germany's New Whistleblower Protection Act

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    Germany recently passed a whistleblowing law, which will bring new obligations for companies, and businesses with more than 50 employees must now check whether they have adequate reporting lines in place and properly staffed functions to handle whistleblower reports, say Mark Zimmer and Katharina Humphrey at Gibson Dunn.

  • UK Case Shows Risks Of Taking Shortcuts In Fund Payments

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    While the High Court recently reversed a decision in Floreat Investment Management v. Churchill, finding that investors routing funds into their own accounts was not dishonest, the case serves as a cautionary tale on the dangers of directing investment funds other than as contractually provided, say lawyers at Dechert.

  • How The UK Employment Court Backlogs Jeopardize Justice

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    While employment tribunal case delays may not top the agenda of new Secretary of State for Justice Alex Chalk, recent data reveals deep and long-term issues, including a staggering half a million current or former employees waiting for their case to trudge forward in the queue, says Heather Wilmot at ARAG.

  • A First Look At UK's Reform Approach To EU Employment Law

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    The U.K. government's recent proposal on EU employment laws is relatively modest, retaining the post-Brexit law in areas such as recording working hours and holiday pay calculations, and assuaging predictions of a bonfire of EU employment rights, say Sally Hulston and James Davies at Lewis Silkin.

  • How The UK Noncompete Cap Proposal May Affect Employers

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    Following the U.K. government's plan to limit noncompete clauses to three months, employers will undoubtedly look at other options to prevent post-employment competition, such as use of garden leave, but this may keep employees out of the talent pool, say David Samuels and Tarun Tawakley at Lewis Silkin.

  • Employers Should Welcome UK Guidance On Positive Action

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    Recent guidance from the U.K. government clarifies the often overlooked and misunderstood concept of positive action under the Equality Act 2010, and may help employers feel more confident in using permitted conduct to promote equality, say lawyers at Fieldfisher.

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