Employment UK

  • April 16, 2024

    Legal Experts Uneasy About Post Office Convictions Law

    Legal experts warned a parliamentary committee Tuesday that government plans to introduce legislation to quash the convictions of hundreds of Post Office branch managers could unintentionally set a precedent for other miscarriages of justice. 

  • April 16, 2024

    7,000 Asda Staff Lose Full Disclosure Bid In Equal Pay Case

    A tribunal ruled Tuesday that 7,000 Asda workers whose equal pay claims are stayed pending a lead group action cannot have access to all other claimants' correspondence with the supermarket ahead of the upcoming first battle.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Post Office Boss Says Lawyers Ignored Prosecution Risks

    The Post Office's former chief executive said Tuesday that he was "surprised" that in-house lawyers who prosecuted sub-postmasters based on faulty IT data ignored the risk of failing to disclose certain key facts in court.

  • April 16, 2024

    Ex-Airport Train Staffers Get Early Win In Travel Discount Case

    Former employees of London's Heathrow Express airport train won an appeal Tuesday that they were wrongly barred from a cheap travel benefit after they opted for redundancy — but a new tribunal will decide whether their breach of contract claims can continue.

  • April 16, 2024

    Pensions Industry Backlash Grows Over New Reporting Rules

    The U.K.'s pension watchdog is facing mounting pressure from retirement industry trade bodies to back down from its new reporting obligations for schemes.

  • April 16, 2024

    UK Pension Transfer Numbers Continue To Decline

    The number of savers transferring from defined benefit to defined contribution pension schemes dropped by 32% in the financial year that ended in March 2023, according to figures published Tuesday by the Financial Conduct Authority.

  • April 16, 2024

    Insurance Manager Harassed By Bosses Wins £56K

    A tribunal has ordered a British insurance broker to pay a former manager more than £56,000 ($69,800) after ruling that the business pushed her out because bosses no longer valued her after she went off sick with anxiety and depression.

  • April 16, 2024

    UK Pension Withdrawals Hit Record High

    The number of people making lump sum withdrawals from their U.K. pension savings reached a record high during the financial year that ended in March 2023, according to a new report by the country's financial watchdog published Tuesday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Testifies To Handshake Deals, Backdating

    Autonomy's former U.S. head of sales testified for the prosecution Monday in the criminal fraud trial of founder Michael Lynch, saying he boosted sales figures via "quid pro quo" handshake deals with customers, created pretextual emails to cover his tracks and even backdated a deal to meet revenue targets.

  • April 15, 2024

    Rastafarian Ex-Army Band Player Wins Race Bias Case

    A former British Army horn player has won his racial discrimination case against the Ministry of Defence, with a tribunal concluding that officers stereotyped him as an "angry Black man" and dismissed his complaints about racist treatment.

  • April 15, 2024

    No Quid Pro Quo In Thank You Posts, Fired Journalist Says

    A sports journalist fired after publicly thanking a company that was a corporate sponsor of his charity fundraising efforts argued to an employment tribunal Monday that there was "no quid pro quo" that compromised the BBC.

  • April 15, 2024

    Prison Governor Loses Claim He Was Excluded From Union

    A prison governor lost his claim against a trade union that refused to let him join its ranks twice because he had held key positions in another union that competed with it, an employment tribunal has ruled.

  • April 15, 2024

    AML Exec Loses Bid For Interim Pay In Whistleblowing Case

    The co-founder of a London-based payments platform provider has lost his bid to be paid his £190,000 ($237,000) salary while he pursues a whistleblowing and unfair dismissal claim against the company.

  • April 15, 2024

    Trainee Solicitor's Bid To Claim SQE Fees From Ex-Firm Fails

    A trainee solicitor cannot recoup fees for her legal qualification examinations from her former employer, with a tribunal finding that she failed to prove that the law firm had agreed to pay the fees.

  • April 15, 2024

    Pension Protection Fund Has 'Crucial' Future Role, LCP Says

    The Pension Protection Fund could play a crucial role in the "endgame" for defined benefit pension schemes as a state-backed consolidator of smaller retirement plans, a consultancy has said.

  • April 12, 2024

    US-based MSD Broke Ban On Using 'Merck' In UK, Court Finds

    U.S.-based Merck Sharp & Dohme LLC's use of the "Merck" name on websites and social media breached the terms of a court order barring it from using the name in the U.K. to protect German drugmaker Merck KGaA's rights, a London court ruled Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    UK Litigation Roundup: Here's What You Missed In London

    This past week in London has seen footwear brand Dr. Martens hit online retailer Temu with a passing off claim, Welsh soccer club Swansea sue its former head coach Russell Martin, Russian diamond tycoon Dmitry Tsvetkov file a claim against his former business Equix Group Ltd., and U.S. bank Omega Financial Corporation hit African oil and gas company Tende Energy with a claim. Here, Law360 looks at these and other new claims in the U.K.

  • April 12, 2024

    John Lewis Beats Muslim Worker's Discrimination Claim

    Department store John Lewis has beaten accusations that it discriminated against a Muslim employee, but it botched the process for sacking him, a tribunal has ruled.

  • April 12, 2024

    Abbott Loses Bid To Nix UK Whistleblowing Case On Appeal

    An appeals tribunal has rejected Abbott Laboratories' bid to escape a whistleblowing case brought by the founders of a British DNA technology business that it bought, concluding on Friday that the founders had an arguable case that U.K. judges had jurisdiction.

  • April 12, 2024

    Temp Engineer Must Pay £27K For 'Vexatious' Behavior

    An employment tribunal has ordered a temp to pay thousands of pounds in litigation costs for bringing a claim he knew he would lose, having previously failed to show on three other occasions that he was an employee or a worker.

  • April 12, 2024

    Kingsley Napley Launches 'Enhanced' Carers' Leave

    Kingsley Napley LLP said Friday that it will provide a week's paid leave for employees to care for children, elderly parents or disabled relatives, a move that exceeds its statutory obligations and sets a precedent for other firms in the industry.

  • April 12, 2024

    Sky Managers Can't Appeal Dismissal Case On New Grounds

    Two former Sky store managers cannot reargue their claim that the company owes them money following a mandatory change of role, an appeals tribunal has ruled, blocking them from raising a challenge on grounds that did not come up in the original case.

  • April 12, 2024

    Over 800 Directors Banned For COVID Loan Fraud In 1 Yr

    A total of 831 company directors were banned in the last 12 months for defrauding the COVID loan support scheme for businesses following investigations by the Insolvency Service, the government agency said Friday.

  • April 12, 2024

    Pension Body Warns Of 'Burdensome' New Reporting Rules

    A U.K. pension industry body has called for new reporting regulations on the sector to be toned down, warning that the additional red tape could deter smaller schemes from taking steps to improve their investment strategies.

  • April 11, 2024

    Autonomy Became Less Transparent Before Sale, Jury Told

    An ex-market analyst testifying Thursday in a California criminal trial over claims that former Autonomy CEO Michael Lynch duped HP into buying the British company for $11.7 billion told jurors that the company became less forthcoming about some of its accounting a couple of years before the sale.

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    UK Whistleblowers Flock To The US For Good Reason

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    The U.K. Serious Fraud Office director recently brought renewed attention to the differences between the U.K. and U.S. whistleblower regimes — differences that may make reporting to U.S. agencies a better and safer option for U.K. whistleblowers, and show why U.K. whistleblower laws need to be improved, say Benjamin Calitri and Kate Reeves at Kohn Kohn.

  • No-Poach Agreements Face Greater EU Antitrust Scrutiny

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    EU competition authorities are increasingly viewing employer no-poach agreements as anti-competitive and an enforcement priority, demonstrating that such provisions are no longer without risk in Europe, and proving the importance of understanding EU antitrust law concerns and implications, says Robert Hardy at Greenberg Traurig.

  • Water Special Administration Changes May Affect Creditors

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    Following the publication of new legislation, changes are afoot to the U.K. government's statutory regime governing special administrations for regulated water companies — and one consequence may be that some creditors of such companies will find themselves in a more uncertain position, say Helena Clarke and Charlotte Møller at Squire Patton.

  • Opinion

    Labour Should Reconsider Its Discrimination Law Plans

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    While the Labour Party's recent proposals allowing equal pay claims based on ethnicity and disability, and introducing dual discrimination, have laudable intentions and bring some advantages, they are not the right path forward as the changes complicate the discrimination claim process for employees, say Colin Leckey and Tarun Tawakley at Lewis Silkin.

  • Tracing The History Of LGBTQ+ Rights In The Workplace

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    Pride History month is a timely reminder of how recent developments have shaped LGBTQ+ employees' rights in the workplace today, and what employers can do to ensure that employees are protected from discrimination, including creating safe workplace cultures and promoting allyship, say Caitlin Farrar and Jessica Bennett at Farrer.

  • Ruling In FCA Case Offers Tips On Flexible Work Requests

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    In Wilson v. Financial Conduct Authority, the Employment Tribunal recently found that the regulator's rejection of a remote work request was justified, highlighting for employers factors that affect flexible work request outcomes, while emphasizing that individual inquiries should be considered on the specific facts, say Frances Rollin, Ella Tunnell and Kerry Garcia at Stevens & Bolton.

  • Breaking Down The New UK Pension Funding Regs

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    Recently published U.K. pension regulations, proposing major changes to funding and investing in defined benefit pension schemes, raise implementation considerations for trustees, including the importance of the employer covenant, say Charles Magoffin and Elizabeth Bullock at Freshfields.

  • Pension Scheme Ruling Elucidates Conversion Issues

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    In Newell Trustees v. Newell Rubbermaid UK Services, the High Court recently upheld a pension plan's conversion of final salary benefits to money purchase benefits, a welcome conclusion that considered several notable issues, such as how to construe pension deeds and when contracts made outside scheme rules can determine benefits, say Ian Gordon and Jamie Barnett at Gowling.

  • Workplace Bullying Bill Implications For Employers And Execs

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    In light of the upcoming parliamentary debate on the Bullying and Respect at Work Bill, organizations should consider how a statutory definition of "workplace bullying" could increase employee complaints and how senior executives would be implicated if the bill becomes law, says Sophie Rothwell at Charles Russell.

  • Amazon's €32M Data Protection Fine Acts As Employer Caveat

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    The recent decision by French data privacy regulator CNIL to fine Amazon for excessive surveillance of its workers opens up a raft of potential employment law, data protection and breach of contract issues, and offers a clear warning that companies need coherent justification for monitoring employees, say Robert Smedley and William Richmond-Coggan at Freeths.

  • Employers Can 'Waive' Goodbye To Unknown Future Claims

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    The Scottish Court of Session's recent decision in Bathgate v. Technip Singapore, holding that unknown future claims in a qualifying settlement agreement can be waived, offers employers the possibility of achieving a clean break when terminating employees and provides practitioners with much-needed guidance on how future cases might be dealt with in court, says Natasha Nichols at Farrer & Co.

  • Why Investment In Battery Supply Chain Is Important For UK

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    The recently published U.K. battery strategy sets out the government’s vision for a globally competitive battery supply chain, and it is critical that the U.K. secures investment to maximize opportunities for economic prosperity and net-zero transition, say lawyers at Watson Farley & Williams.

  • Ruling Elucidates Tensions In Assessing Employee Disability

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    An employment tribunal's recent decision, maintaining that dermatitis was not a disability, but stress was, illustrates tensions in the interaction between statutory guidance on reasonable behavior modifications and Equality Act measures, says Suzanne Nulty at Weightmans.

  • ECJ Ruling Triggers Reconsiderations Of Using AI In Hiring

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    A recent European Court of Justice ruling, clarifying that the General Data Protection Regulation could apply to decisions made by artificial intelligence, serves as a warning to employers, as the use of AI in recruitment may lead to more discrimination claims, say Dino Wilkinson and James Major at Clyde & Co.

  • Supreme Court Ruling Is A Gift To Insolvency Practitioners

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    As corporate criminal liability is in sharp focus, the Supreme Court's recent decision in Palmer v. Northern Derbyshire Magistrates' Court that administrators are not company officers and should not be held liable under U.K. labor law is instructive in focusing on the substance and not merely the title of a person's role within a company, say lawyers at Greenberg Traurig.

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