Wage & Hour

  • April 17, 2024

    NLRB Says Co. Violated Labor Law With Wage Suit Questions

    A chemical manufacturer illegally questioned an employee about his conversations with co-workers and union stewards linked to a wage and hour lawsuit, the National Labor Relations Board concluded, upholding an agency judge's decision about the workers' confidentiality interests.

  • April 17, 2024

    Ogletree Expands Into Western NY With Ex-Goldberg Atty

    Management-side employment firm Ogletree Deakins is expanding into western New York, announcing Tuesday that it is adding a shareholder in Buffalo from Goldberg Segalla.

  • April 17, 2024

    Bright Line On Arbitration Seen As Risk To Workers' Rights

    A Ninth Circuit ruling that companies cannot qualify for a federal arbitration exemption is a surprising bright line that may curtail workers' wage rights in the future, experts say.

  • April 17, 2024

    Discovery In $500M Severance Fight Against X, Musk Will Wait

    A California federal judge paused discovery in a suit claiming X, formerly Twitter, owes $500 million in severance to the workers the company laid off after Elon Musk's takeover, saying the court should wait to sort out the company's dismissal bid.

  • April 17, 2024

    Military IT Contractor Didn't Pay OT, Ex-Worker Says

    A Virginia-based technology company that contracts with the U.S. military has not been paying its hourly employees time-and-a-half overtime premiums even though they regularly work more than 60 hours a week, according to a proposed class action filed in federal court.

  • April 16, 2024

    Virtual Cashiers Can Help Cut Wage Costs But Risk Liability

    Virtual cashiers from overseas who are appearing on screens in a handful of New York-area restaurants can help employers reduce labor costs, but attorneys warn that the practice could lead to issues such as wage claims by in-store workers. Here, Law360 explores the issue.

  • April 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Won't Rehear White Ex-Kroger Manager's Bias Case

    A former manager for Kroger will not get to argue his claims he was fired because he is a white man before the full Sixth Circuit, according to a new order, letting stand the appellate court's decision to dismiss the former manager's claims.

  • April 16, 2024

    Pot Transport Co. Can't Escape Overtime Suit

    A company specializing in secure transport of marijuana products didn't show that its drivers engage in interstate commerce and therefore can't escape a driver's misclassification suit seeking unpaid overtime, a Michigan federal judge has ruled.

  • April 16, 2024

    DoorDash, Fla. Driver Settle Classification Suit In Arbitration

    A DoorDash driver and the app-based food delivery service resolved in arbitration a suit originally filed in Florida federal court alleging the company misclassified workers as independent contractors, according to court papers.

  • April 16, 2024

    Construction Subcontractor Fined $34K After DOL Probe

    A federal construction subcontractor working on apartments in Washington, D.C., was fined more than $34,000 for misclassifying nine workers, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

  • April 16, 2024

    Arbitration Pacts Leave Domino's Wage Suit Plaintiff-Less

    An expense reimbursement dispute against Domino's can't go forward because it will be without a named plaintiff, as the four drivers who were supposed to step in are all bound by arbitration agreements, a Michigan federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Drivers Can't Avoid Uber's 'Road Not Taken' Position

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has ruled that the luxury car drivers who accused Uber Technologies Inc. of misclassifying them as independent contractors must respond to the company's renewed post-trial win bid, rejecting the drivers' argument that it was too long and filed too late.

  • April 15, 2024

    Jury Sides With Ala. City Education Board In Pay Bias Suit

    An Alabama federal jury rejected a former athletic director's gender bias suit alleging she was paid less than male colleagues and demoted by an Alabama school board, four months after the case was revived by the Eleventh Circuit.

  • April 15, 2024

    Versace Mansion Workers Lose Bid To Revive Wage Claims

    Workers at the former Versace Mansion can't revive their minimum wage claims because a service fee charge is not a discretionary tip and was lawfully used to top off the workers' base hourly pay, the Eleventh Circuit said Monday.

  • April 15, 2024

    Arbitration Carveout's Scope To Turn On Where Line Is Drawn

    Following the U.S. Supreme Court's decision that a worker's job duties are key for determining whether someone is exempt from federal arbitration law, the fight will turn to where lower courts draw the line for how much transportation work is enough to get the carveout, attorneys told Law360.

  • April 15, 2024

    Pharmacy, Courier Co. Settle Driver's Classification Suit

    A delivery driver and a CVS-owned pharmacy and a logistics and courier firm told an Illinois federal court that they have reached a settlement resolving claims that the company misclassified workers as independent contractors and paid them neither minimum nor overtime premium wages. 

  • April 15, 2024

    Calif. Trucking Groups To Fight AB 5 Ruling At 9th Circ.

    A pair of California trucking industry groups and two drivers signaled they want the Ninth Circuit to undo a lower court's rejection of their challenge to the state's independent contractor classification law, known as A.B. 5.

  • April 12, 2024

    Wash. Hospital Workers Say Class Suits Are Mirror Images

    A group of healthcare workers urged a Washington state judge to find that their employer has violated the same wage laws that an affiliated hospital system was recently found liable for in a parallel case, contending at a Friday hearing that the two class actions ultimately target the same parent company.

  • April 12, 2024

    Jackson Lewis Hires Employment Litigator In Baltimore

    Employer-side firm Jackson Lewis PC has added a former U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission litigator to its Baltimore office who says her experience with the federal bias watchdog gives her a comprehensive view on how to advise clients.

  • April 12, 2024

    Ex-Luxury Brand Workers Request Class Cert. In OT Suit

    Retail workers for the high-end fashion brand Comme Des Garçons asked a New York federal judge to grant them nationwide collective certification in a lawsuit alleging the company misclassified them as managers and failed to pay them overtime wages, saying their job duties and compensation methods are the same.

  • April 12, 2024

    Journalists Say WARN Act Claims Perfect For Class Cert.

    Workers for the now-shuttered digital media startup The Messenger urged a New York federal judge Friday to certify a class of hundreds of staffers who were terminated with no advance notice in violation of the Worker Adjustment and Retraining Notification Act, saying the law is suited for class wide proceedings.

  • April 12, 2024

    Online Pharmacy Wants Out Of Courier's Misclassification Suit

    An online pharmacy asked a Massachusetts federal judge Friday to toss claims against it in a delivery worker's independent contractor misclassification lawsuit against the pharmacy and its delivery provider, saying the delivery company is the worker's sole employer.

  • April 12, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Twitter Wants Age Bias Suit Tossed

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential dismissal of a proposed age discrimination class and collective action against Twitter Inc. and its successor, X Corp. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • April 12, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Tech Co. Retaliation Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a former marketing manager's lawsuit claiming that the head of the technology company where she worked sexually harassed her and that she was fired after she refused his advances. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 12, 2024

    SC Home Care Co. Pays $37K For Misclassifying Workers

    A South Carolina home healthcare company paid more than $37,000 after it misclassified 35 workers, the U.S. Department of Labor announced.

Expert Analysis

  • Water Cooler Talk: Investigation Lessons In 'Minority Report'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper discuss how themes in Steven Spielberg's Science Fiction masterpiece "Minority Report" — including prediction, prevention and the fallibility of systems — can have real-life implications in workplace investigations.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • NYC Cos. Must Prepare For Increased Sick Leave Liability

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    A recent amendment to New York City's sick leave law authorizes employees for the first time to sue their employers for violations — so employers should ensure their policies and practices are compliant now to avoid the crosshairs of litigation once the law takes effect in March, says Melissa Camire at Fisher Phillips.

  • Employer Trial Tips For Fighting Worker PPE Pay Claims

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    Courts have struggled for decades to reach consensus on whether employees must be paid for time spent donning and doffing personal protective equipment, but this convoluted legal history points to practical trial strategies to help employers defeat these Fair Labor Standards Act claims, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • Employer Lessons From NLRB Judge's Union Bias Ruling

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    A National Labor Relations Board judge’s recent decision that a Virginia drywall contractor unlawfully transferred and fired workers who made union pay complaints illustrates valuable lessons about how employers should respond to protected labor activity and federal labor investigations, says Kenneth Jenero at Holland & Knight.

  • 9 Tools To Manage PAGA Claims After Calif. High Court Ruling

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    In Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills, the California Supreme Court recently dealt a blow to employers by ruling that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, but defendants and courts can still use arbitration agreements, due process challenges and other methods when dealing with unmanageable claims, says Ryan Krueger at Sheppard Mullin.

  • The 7th Circ.'s Top 10 Civil Opinions Of 2023

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    Attorneys at Jenner & Block examine the most significant decisions issued by the Seventh Circuit in 2023, and explain how they may affect issues related to antitrust, constitutional law, federal jurisdiction and more.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • Calif. High Court Ruling Outlines Limits On PAGA Actions

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    While the California Supreme Court’s ruling last week in Estrada v. Royalty Carpet Mills held that courts cannot dismiss Private Attorneys General Act claims on manageability grounds, the opinion also details how claims can be narrowed, providing a road map for defendants facing complex actions, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • NY Pay Frequency Cases May Soon Be A Thing Of The Past

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    Two recent developments in New York state have unfurled to suggest that the high tide of frequency-of-pay lawsuits may soon recede, giving employers the upper hand when defending against threatened or pending claims, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

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    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • How To Start Applying DOL's Independent Contractor Test

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    Last week, the U.S. Department of Labor finalized a worker classification rule that helpfully includes multiple factors that employers can leverage to systematically evaluate the economic realities of working relationships, says Elizabeth Arnold and Samantha Stelman at Berkeley Research Group.

  • PAGA Turns 20: An Employer Road Map For Managing Claims

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    As California’s Private Attorneys General Act turns 20, the arbitrability of individual and representative claims remains relatively unsettled — but employers can potentially avoid litigation involving both types of claims by following guidance from the California Supreme Court’s Adolph v. Uber ruling, say attorneys at Mintz.