Wage & Hour

  • May 10, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Police Officer's Bias Case

    This week, the Second Circuit is scheduled to consider a former Ramapo, New York, police officer's lawsuit claiming the town discriminated against her on the basis of her race and gender when it did not assign her a light duty assignment after she returned to the job from an injury. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 10, 2024

    NYPD K9 Handlers' Overtime Suit Sent To Dog House, For Now

    A group of 11 New York City Police Department dog handlers must revise their unpaid overtime lawsuit to reflect the actual time they allegedly spent at home taking care of their dogs in order to stake a plausible claim for unpaid overtime, a federal judge ruled.

  • May 10, 2024

    PF Chang's Allowed To Keep 6K-Worker Wage Deal Concealed

    P.F. Chang's can file settlement papers with dollar amounts shielded from public view as the restaurant chain looks to resolve a 5-year-old suit accusing it of cheating more than 6,000 tipped servers out of wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled.

  • May 10, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: 9th Circ. To Hear Ex-Chief's Free Speech Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for Ninth Circuit oral arguments in a former police chief's First Amendment case. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 10, 2024

    Workers Push Back On Citizens Bank's Bid For OT Win

    Pennsylvania wage law requires employers to pay workers overtime rates that include all compensation earned, including commissions, a group of workers accusing Citizens Bank of underpaying overtime wages told a federal judge, urging the court to deny the bank's request for a win.

  • May 10, 2024

    3 Cases Poised To Apply High Court's Arbitration Ruling

    Cases that were in the judicial pipeline when the U.S. Supreme Court handed down a ruling on what workers qualify for a carveout from federal arbitration law are poised to be among the first that apply its holding. Here, Law360 discusses three cases that were frozen in anticipation of the high court's decision.

  • May 09, 2024

    Rail Co. Accused Of Retaliation Over FMLA Use

    CSX Transportation Inc. has been hit with a Florida federal lawsuit brought by its workers, who allege in their proposed class action that the rail company discouraged them from lawfully using the Family and Medical Leave Act, including by punishing them for taking advantage of the law.

  • May 09, 2024

    NY Healthcare Co. Gets Worker's Wage Suit Trimmed

    An Albany, New York-based health system can escape, for now, a proposed collective claim alleging it denied workers overtime wages, a federal judge ruled Thursday, while preserving a claim that it forced employees to work through their lunch breaks.

  • May 09, 2024

    Tenn. County Untangles Collective In Wage Suit Ahead Of Trial

    A Tennessee county snagged a partial decertification win in a lawsuit accusing it of not properly paying a variety of workers within its sheriff's office, after a federal judge ruled that the workers' differences in jobs prevent collective treatment.

  • May 09, 2024

    Staffing Cos. Can't Dodge DOL Suit Over Wage Clawbacks

    The U.S. Department of Labor can keep pursuing a suit alleging two staffing agencies drew employees' compensation below minimum wage by implementing contractual clawbacks if employees didn't stay for more than three years, a New York federal judge ruled.

  • May 09, 2024

    Feds' Pay Bias Suit Against Wis. Military Affairs Heads To Trial

    A federal judge refused Thursday to grant the Wisconsin Department of Military Affairs a win in a lawsuit brought by the U.S. Department of Justice, saying a jury could find that the state agency lowballed an applicant for a director position because she's a woman.

  • May 09, 2024

    Liquor Co. Ordered To Stop Flouting Law After DOL Wage Deal

    An Indiana federal judge issued an injunction barring a multistate liquor store operator from violating federal labor law after the U.S. Department of Labor accused it of flouting a previous back wage settlement by coercing workers to accept less money than they were owed.

  • May 09, 2024

    6th Circ. Panel Skeptical Of NLRB Hazard Pay Ruling

    A Sixth Circuit panel questioned on Thursday a National Labor Relations Board decision finding a Michigan nursing home violated federal labor law with its handling of temporary hazard pay and staffing during the COVID-19 pandemic, with judges appearing skeptical the company had to bargain over the changes.

  • May 09, 2024

    DOL Wage Enforcement Penalties Come Under Scrutiny

    Civil monetary penalties aren’t high enough to deter employers from violating wage and hour laws, Democrats in Congress are saying ahead of planned legislation, though employers’ attorneys argue that existing fines are adequate. Here, Law360 explores the penalties debate.

  • May 09, 2024

    Plumbing Co. Ignoring OT Precedent, 1st Circ. Judge Chides

    A First Circuit judge said Thursday that a plumbing supply distributor arguing that its inside sales representatives don't qualify for overtime pay appears to be "running as fast as you can to get away" from a key recent precedent.

  • May 09, 2024

    Ballard Spahr Atty Among 5 Rimon Arrivals On Both Coasts

    Rimon PC has expanded its offices in New Jersey, Philadelphia, Orlando, San Francisco and San Diego with the addition of five attorneys, bolstering its intellectual property, investment management, real estate, employment and litigation capabilities, the firm announced Thursday.

  • May 09, 2024

    Calif. Panel Keeps PAGA Claims Out Of Arbitration

    A Los Angeles trial court correctly refused to sever an arbitration agreement filled with unconscionable provisions, a California appellate panel ruled, affirming the decision to deny a wireless company's bid to arbitrate a worker individual Private Attorneys General Act claims.

  • May 09, 2024

    Acting Labor Sec. Urges Senate Panel To Back DOL Funding

    Acting Labor Secretary Julie Su on Thursday defended President Joe Biden's U.S. Department of Labor budget, telling a Senate panel that such funding is necessary to recover workers' stolen wages and fight unlawful child labor, among other priorities.

  • May 09, 2024

    Nike Denied Nursing Workers Lactation Spaces, Suit Says

    Nike failed to provide nursing employees with adequate breaks or spaces to express breast milk and told a manager that she was setting a bad example for her team when she asked to pump milk outside of her scheduled breaks, a lawsuit filed in Los Angeles County superior court said.

  • May 09, 2024

    Charter, Workers Both Want Quick Win In Vacation Time Suit

    Workers alleging that Charter Communications failed to pay out unused vacation time when it merged with Time Warner Cable asked a California federal judge to grant them a win, saying state wage law unambiguously requires the payouts, while Charter urged the court to find the opposite.

  • May 09, 2024

    Bronx Urgent Care, DOL Reach $160K Deal In Wage Suit

    An urgent care in the Bronx will pay $160,000 in back wages, damages and fines to end a U.S. Department of Labor suit accusing it of stiffing workers on overtime pay, according to court papers.

  • May 08, 2024

    Lyft Driver Asks Calif. Justices To OK Intervening In PAGA Suit

    An attorney for a Lyft driver who sued the company under the Private Attorneys General Act urged the California Supreme Court on Wednesday to find her client has standing to intervene in a competing PAGA Lyft case that reached a settlement, saying the deal threatened to "extinguish" her client's rights.

  • May 08, 2024

    4th Circ. Says Purpose Of Inmate Labor Affects Classification

    The primary purpose of prisoners' work at a Baltimore County recycling plant should determine whether a group of incarcerated people were employees under federal law, a Fourth Circuit panel ruled Wednesday, rejecting the county's view that any amount of rehabilitative-oriented work spared it from minimum wage obligations.

  • May 08, 2024

    Arbitration Pact Doesn't Bar PAGA Penalty Claims, Panel Says

    An arbitration agreement a worker signed with a gardening retailer doesn't apply to his representative civil penalty claims under California's Private Attorneys General Act, a state appellate panel held, saying the language of the agreement shows the parties didn't intend to arbitrate those kinds of disputes.

  • May 08, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Farmworkers Union Says DOL's 2022 Rules Keep Wages Low

    A farmworkers union in Washington state is challenging rules the U.S. Department of Labor introduced in 2022 that the union said are depressing farmworkers' wages.

Expert Analysis

  • Ill. Temp Labor Rules: No Clear Road Map For Compliance

    Author Photo

    While the delay of a particularly thorny provision of the Illinois temporary worker law will provide some short-term relief, staffing agencies and their clients will still need to scramble to plan compliance with the myriad vague requirements imposed by the other amendments to the act, say Alexis Dominguez and Alissa Griffin at Neal Gerber.

  • Tips For Defeating Claims Of Willful FLSA Violations

    Author Photo

    As employers increasingly encounter wage and hour complaints under the Fair Labor Standards Act, more companies could face enhanced penalties for violations deemed willful, but defense counsel can use several discovery and trial strategies to instead demonstrate the employer’s commitment to compliance, say Michael Mueller and Evangeline Paschal at Hunton.

  • A Gov't Contractor's Guide To Davis-Bacon Prevailing Wages

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
    Author Photo

    In light of shifting federal infrastructure priorities and recent updates to U.S. Department of Labor regulations, employers should take the time to revisit the basics of prevailing wage requirements for federal contractors under the Davis-Bacon Act and similar laws, says Timothy Taylor at Holland & Knight.

  • Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

    Author Photo

    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • 1st Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify Test For FLSA Admin Exemption

    Author Photo

    The First Circuit’s recent decision in Marcus v. American Contract Bridge League will help employers navigate the Fair Labor Standards Act's "general business operations" exemption and make the crucial and often confusing decision of whether white collar employees are overtime-exempt administrators or nonexempt frontline producers of products and services, says Mark Tabakman at Fox Rothschild.

  • 3 Employer Strategies To Streamline Mass Arbitrations

    Author Photo

    Workers under arbitration agreements have gained an edge on their employers by filing floods of tedious and expensive individualized claims, but companies can adapt to this new world of mass arbitration by applying several new strategies that may streamline the dispute-resolution process, says Michael Strauss at Alternative Resolution Centers.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • The Growing Need For FLSA Private Settlement Rule Clarity

    Author Photo

    A Pennsylvania district court's recent ruling in Walker v. Marathon Petroleum echoes an interesting and growing trend of jurists questioning the need for — and legality of — judicial approval of private Fair Labor Standards Act settlements, which provides more options for parties to efficiently resolve their claims, says Rachael Coe at Moore & Van Allen.

  • High Court Bakery Driver Case Could Limit Worker Arbitration

    Author Photo

    Employers that require arbitration of worker claims under the Federal Arbitration Act should closely follow Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries as it goes before the U.S. Supreme Court, which could thoroughly expand the definition of “transportation workers” who are exempt from compulsory arbitration and force companies to field more employee disputes in court, says Nick Morisani at Phelps Dunbar.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Advancing Equal Pay

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently finalized strategic enforcement plan expresses a renewed commitment to advancing equal pay at a time when employees have unprecedented access to compensation information, highlighting for employers the importance of open communication and ongoing pay equity analyses, say Paul Evans at Baker McKenzie and Christine Hendrickson at Syndio.

  • Return Days Key In Hyatt COVID-19 Layoffs Ruling

    Author Photo

    The Ninth Circuit’s recent decision in Hartstein v. Hyatt, which clarified when the hotel giant had to pay out accrued vacation time after pandemic-prompted temporary layoffs, highlights the importance of whether an employer specifies a return date within the normal pay period, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How ESG Is Taking Women's Soccer To The Next Level

    Author Photo

    Several elite soccer teams sharpened their competitive edges for the 2023 Women's World Cup by focusing on environmental, social and governance issues at home, demonstrating that many industries can use the principles of ESG investing to identify opportunities to increase growth, improve performance and address stakeholders' desires, say attorneys at ArentFox Schiff.

  • How Int'l Strategies Can Mitigate US Child Labor Risks

    Author Photo

    Recent reports of child labor in the U.S. raise significant compliance concerns under state and federal child labor laws, but international business and human rights principles provide tools companies can use to identify, mitigate and remediate the risks, says Tom Plotkin at Covington.