Wage & Hour

  • May 16, 2024

    High Court Decision Requiring A Stay Raises More Questions

    The U.S. Supreme Court's unanimous decision Thursday finding that federal courts must honor a request to stay a case after ordering the dispute into arbitration leaves an important subsequent question unresolved: What happens if neither party requests a stay?

  • May 16, 2024

    Calif. Panel Says Signature Wasn't Rebutted On Arbitral Pact

    A worker failed to show that a signature in an employee handbook containing an arbitration clause wasn't his, a California state appeals court ruled, flipping a trial court's decision that denied a mining company's bid to arbitrate his wage and hour suit.

  • May 16, 2024

    Wis. Appeals Court Undoes Corrections Workers' Wage Class

    A Wisconsin appeals court dissolved a class of state Department of Corrections employees who argued they are owed pay for the time they spent undergoing security checks and walking to and from their assigned work posts, ruling a lower court used an invalid legal theory in certifying the group.

  • May 16, 2024

    Ex-Bronx DA Worker Says Discrimination Suit Should Stand

    A former employee at the Bronx District Attorney's Office said Thursday she supported her claims that the office discriminated against her for seeking medical leave and denied her a promotion because she's Black, urging a New York federal court to keep alive her suit alive.

  • May 16, 2024

    Pressure Mounts On Biden Admin To Finalize Regulations

    The U.S. Department of Labor and other federal agencies face pressure to complete rulemaking this month because a window opens soon that will make it easier for Republicans in Congress to wipe away regulations if they and former President Donald Trump sweep the November elections, experts told Law360.

  • May 16, 2024

    Delta, Flight Attendants Ink $16M Deal To End Wage Suit

    Delta Air Lines flight attendants reached a nearly $16 million settlement with the company in an almost decadelong suit accusing the airline of wage statement violations, they told a California federal judge, saying the "extremely favorable" deal should be approved because it would give class members close to full reimbursement.

  • May 16, 2024

    SC Convenience Store Pays $154K For OT Violations

    A gas station and convenience store in South Carolina paid nearly $154,000 for denying workers overtime rates, the U.S. Department of Labor said.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Courts Must Stay Suits Sent To Arbitration

    The U.S. Supreme Court unanimously concluded Thursday that federal courts do not have discretion to toss a case once it's decided that the claims belong in arbitration, ruling in a wage and overtime suit brought by delivery drivers against their employer.

  • May 16, 2024

    Justices Say Deadline To Appeal Furlough Denial Is Flexible

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday revived a Pentagon employee's dispute seeking an exemption from a furlough, saying that a missed 60-day deadline to appeal the denied exemption does not put the matter out of federal courts' jurisdiction.

  • May 15, 2024

    Georgia Justices Weigh State Immunity In Trooper's Wage Suit

    Georgia's Department of Public Safety urged the state's highest court on Wednesday to undo a Georgia Court of Appeals decision that revived a state trooper's suit alleging that the department failed to pay him owed overtime for time spent in training, arguing that the state never waived its sovereign immunity privilege.

  • May 15, 2024

    Worker Updates Boot-Up Suit After Judge Axes State Claims

    A former call center worker on Tuesday lodged an amended class action complaint seeking boot-up time wages from a home healthcare company, raising only federal claims after a Michigan federal judge earlier this year stripped state law allegations from the suit.

  • May 15, 2024

    Wage Damages Update Isn't Retroactive, NJ Justices Say

    The New Jersey Supreme Court on Wednesday held an amendment to the state's wage laws adding liquidated damages and extending the statute of limitations should only be applied to conduct that occurred after its effective date, backing the dismissal of some claims brought by laborers alleging unpaid pre- and post-shift work.

  • May 15, 2024

    Staffing Co.'s Wage Settlement Gets Approval On 4th Attempt

    After three tries, a Georgia federal judge approved a settlement Wednesday between a staffing firm and two workers who alleged that the firm shorted them on wages by making them work through unpaid meal breaks, finding the latest amendment fixed previous inconsistencies.

  • May 15, 2024

    School District, Teachers Can't Snag Win In Equal Pay Fight

    Neither a Pennsylvania school district nor the female teachers accusing it of paying them less than their male colleagues can snag a win in two consolidated Equal Pay Act suits, a federal judge ruled Wednesday, saying there are still open questions in the cases.

  • May 15, 2024

    Tenn. Restaurant Workers Get Approval Of Tip Violation Deal

    A Nashville, Tennessee, restaurant will pay $375,000 to end a collective action claiming it stiffed tipped employees on their full wages, after a Tennessee federal judge signed off on a settlement. 

  • May 15, 2024

    AstraZeneca Sales Reps Win Early Cert. In Gender Bias Suit

    An Illinois federal judge on Tuesday granted a bid by workers to conditionally certify a collective in a lawsuit alleging AstraZeneca paid women less than men, giving the green light for notices to be sent out to female sales representatives who have worked at the pharmaceutical giant since late 2018.

  • May 15, 2024

    Untranslated Arbitral Pact Can Stand In Wage Row, Panel Says

    A California winery's failure to translate an arbitration agreement from English to Spanish doesn't make the pact fraudulent, a state appellate panel ruled, flipping a trial court's decision finding that a group of former cellar workers could keep their wage suit in court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Last-Mile Amazon Driver Does Interstate Work, Panel Says

    A driver for a logistics company who primarily made local deliveries for Amazon was engaged in interstate commerce and thus exempt from mandatory arbitration, a California appeals court has held, saying the worker's wage and hour claims can remain in state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    IT Recruiters Pursue Win Against Staffing Co. In OT Class Suit

    Recruiters for tech staffing company TEKsystems have asked a California federal judge to award them a pretrial win on their claim that the company misclassified them, saying recruiters are entry-level employees, not managers, so they don't qualify for the narrow exemption to California's overtime statute.

  • May 15, 2024

    Chemical Biz's Worker Numbers Can't Keep Wage Suit Federal

    A chemical company failed to show that more than 100 workers would be part of a proposed class in a suit claiming unpaid wages, a Pennsylvania federal judge ruled, sending the suit back to state court.

  • May 15, 2024

    Toss Of Bonus Bias Claim Too Short On Details, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit has reinstated a Hispanic salesman's claim that he was denied $160,000 in bonuses by a construction contractor out of racial bias after he was fired, ruling the lower court didn't adequately explain why it nixed that allegation.

  • May 15, 2024

    FedEx Contractor Wage Deal Needs Work, Judge Rules

    A California federal judge wouldn't sign off on a settlement for more than $33,000 between a FedEx contractor and delivery drivers to partly end a wage suit that named both FedEx and the contractor, telling the parties the terms lacked necessary information.

  • May 14, 2024

    Venable Opens Colo. Office With 8 Sherman & Howard Attys

    Venable LLP is growing its presence by opening its first office in Colorado, with eight commercial and employment attorneys from Sherman & Howard LLP opening its Denver location, which will be headed by partner-in-charge James "Jim" Sawtelle, the firm announced Tuesday.

  • May 14, 2024

    Conn. Retaliation Suit Advances After Justices' Title VII Ruling

    With a recent U.S. Supreme Court opinion said to be illuminating the path forward, a federal judge in Connecticut has declined to dismiss a case by a self-described former "high-level" employee of a private equity firm who alleges she was fired after raising concerns about her employer's treatment of women.

  • May 14, 2024

    Revised $2.25M Walmart OT Deal Fails For Lack Of Changes

    A California federal judge again refused to approve a $2.25 million deal between Walmart and 1,700 workers that would resolve an unpaid overtime lawsuit, finding that the modified agreement did not fix deficiencies the court had previously identified in the settlement's distribution method.

Expert Analysis

  • Noncompete Ban Is Key To Empowering Low-Wage Workers

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    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete clauses is needed because limitations alone have very little practical value to low-wage workers, who will continue to be hurt by the mere existence of these clauses unless they are outlawed, says Brendan Lynch at Community Legal Services of Philadelphia.

  • Top 5 Issues For Employers If Their Bank Suddenly Fails

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    The sudden closure of a bank can create a host of ripple effects, and if such a liquidity crisis occurs, employers should prioritize fulfilling their payroll obligations, as failing to do so could subject employers and even certain company personnel to substantial penalties, say attorneys at Manatt.

  • Prepare Now To Comply With NJ Temp Worker Law

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    New Jersey temporary staffing firms and their clients must prepare now for the time-consuming compliance requirements created by the controversial new Temporary Laborers' Bill of Rights, or face steep penalties when the law's strict wage, benefit and record-keeping rules go live in May and August, say attorneys at Duane Morris.

  • Employment-Related Litigation Risks Facing Hospitality Cos.

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    A close look at recent hospitality industry employment claims highlights key issues companies should keep an eye out for, and insurance policy considerations for managing risk related to wage and hour, privacy, and human trafficking claims, say Jan Larson and Huiyi Chen at Jenner & Block.

  • Acquiring A Company That Uses A Professional Employer Org.

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    With the professional employer organization industry rapidly expanding, those seeking to acquire a company that uses a PEO should understand there are several employment- and benefits-related complexities, especially in regard to retirement, health and welfare plans, say Megan Monson and Taryn Cannataro at Lowenstein Sandler.

  • What Could Lie Ahead For Prop 22 After Calif. Appellate Ruling

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    On the heels of a California appeals court’s recent decision to uphold Proposition 22 — which allows gig companies to classify workers as independent contractors — an analysis of related rulings and legislation over the past five years should provide context for the next phase of this battle, says Rex Berry at Signature Resolution.

  • 3rd Circ. Ruling Offers Tools To Manage Exempt Employees

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    The Third Circuit’s recent opinion in Higgins v. Bayada Home Health, finding the Fair Labor Standards Act allows employers to deduct paid time off for missed employee productivity targets, gives companies another resource for managing exempt employee inefficiency or absenteeism, says Laura Lawless at Squire Patton.

  • Illinois Paid Leave Law May Create Obstacles For Employers

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    Illinois' Paid Leave for All Workers Act, which goes into effect next year, could create issues and potential liability for employers due to its ambiguity, so companies should review and modify existing workplace policies to prevent challenges, including understaffing, says Matt Tyrrell at Schoenberg Finkel.

  • What Employers Must Know About FLSA 'Salary Basis' Rule

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    To satisfy the salary basis requirement for administrative, executive and professional employee exemptions under the federal Fair Labor Standards Act, employers must take care not to jeopardize employees' exempt status through improper deductions, says Adriana Kosovych at Epstein Becker.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Quiet Quitting Insights From 'Seinfeld'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with Paradies Lagardere's Rebecca Silk about George Costanza's "quiet quitting" tendencies in "Seinfeld" and how such employees raise thorny productivity-monitoring issues for employers.

  • How FLSA Actions Are Playing Out Amid Split On Opt-In Issue

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    Courts are currently split on whether opt-in plaintiffs in collective actions under the Fair Labor Standards Act who join a lawsuit filed by another employee must establish personal jurisdiction, but the resolution could come sooner than one might expect, say Matt Abee and Debbie Durban at Nelson Mullins.

  • Pros And Cons As Calif. Employers Rethink Forced Arbitration

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    As California employers reconsider mandatory arbitration pacts following favorable high-profile federal and state court rulings, they should contemplate the benefits and burdens of such agreements, and fine-tune contract language to ensure continued enforcement, say Niki Lubrano and Brian Cole at CDF Labor Law.

  • What Calif. Employers Need To Know About Wage Theft

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    With the attention of the media, as well as California's state and local governments, now focused on wage theft, more Golden State employers face a dual threat of enforcement and negative publicity, so companies should take specific steps to make sure they don't find their name in the next story, say attorneys at Buchanan Ingersoll.