More Employment Coverage

  • February 21, 2024

    PE Firm Can't Shake Ex-CEO's Retaliation Suit In NC

    A North Carolina federal judge has maintained the bulk of a former executive's suit accusing a private equity firm of duping him into accepting a top role at a defense supply unit and fired him when he refused to hide the company's financial reality from a major defense contractor client, reasoning that he satisfied pleading standards.

  • February 21, 2024

    Salesman Accused Of AI Misuse Must Hand Over Co. Docs

    A Connecticut salesman who allegedly used the artificial intelligence application Otter to record company calls must return any of his former employer's internal documents that are still in his possession and swear that he no longer has any of the material at issue in a trade secrets lawsuit, a federal judge has ruled.

  • February 21, 2024

    Drexel U Dodges Expanded 'Intentional Interference' Claims

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania ruled Wednesday that at-will employees can sue for intentional interference with their employment relationships under state law, but said a former Drexel University accountant who had brought the case before them fell short of showing her supervisor was acting as a third party under the new tort.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tully Rinckey's Employment Terms Violated Rules, Panel Says

    The founders of Tully Rinckey PLLC should be suspended for 90 days for placing improper employment restrictions on people who worked in its Washington, D.C., office, an attorney ethics committee has recommended.

  • February 21, 2024

    Cochran Firm Rachets Up Fee Fight With Ex-Associate

    The Cochran Firm California is escalating its ongoing dispute over attorney fees with a former associate, alleging in a new lawsuit that the now-departed lawyer lied to a managing partner about her relationship with a client with a lucrative claim.

  • February 21, 2024

    Lewis Brisbois Adds 2 Professional Liability Pros In Portland

    Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP has hired two employment and professional liability attorneys previously with Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP as partners in its Portland, Oregon, office, the firm has announced.

  • February 21, 2024

    Wells Fargo Settles With Alleged Trade Secrets Poacher

    A Georgia federal court on Tuesday ended a recently settled lawsuit from Wells Fargo Bank against a former employee who was accused of stealing a trove of records from the bank on the eve of his departure for a competing payment processing company.

  • February 20, 2024

    Bank's Ex-Employees Must Face Trade Secrets Suit

    A Texas federal judge refused on Tuesday to toss the bulk of trade secret claims against a group of former employees of a company that eventually became Centennial Bank, but he did agree to trim some claims.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-OCC Fintech Chief Won Over Top Brass Despite Red Flags

    The Office of the Comptroller of the Currency's onetime fintech chief who seemingly fabricated his professional background appears to have sailed through the hiring process at the agency, according to internal OCC communications obtained by Law360.

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurer Must Pay Defense Costs In Newspaper Shooting Row

    An insurer owed coverage to the parent companies of a Maryland newspaper for the legal fees resulting from two underlying lawsuits brought by the victims and their families after a 2018 mass shooting, an Illinois federal judge ruled Tuesday.

  • February 20, 2024

    DraftKings Pushes To Keep Strict Limits On Former Exec

    Sports betting company DraftKings Inc. on Tuesday urged a Massachusetts federal court to maintain tight restrictions on a previous executive who is now working for Fanatics, bashing the man's attempts at loosening the court's order as "procedural sophistry" that will threaten its business.

  • February 20, 2024

    Biotech Co. SomaLogic, Former Exec Settle Fight Over Stock

    Colorado-based biotechnology company SomaLogic Inc. and a former co-founder of a company it purchased in 2022 have resolved a lawsuit over the executive's departure and the fate of 400,000 unvested shares, with a California federal judge dismissing the case for good on Friday.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fox Rothschild AI Chief Talks 'Terrifying' Deepfakes, Biased AI

    Mark McCreary, the chief artificial intelligence and information security officer at Fox Rothschild, leads his firm's internal AI strategy and provides counsel to other law firms trying to bushwhack their path through the often murky AI legal landscape, rife with hallucinated case law citations and disturbingly real deepfakes.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-Elections Chief Chose To Leave Job, NJ Gov. Says

    New Jersey Gov. Phil Murphy has urged a New Jersey state court judge to toss allegations from the Garden State's former elections chief that his civil rights were violated when he was pushed to resign in retaliation for a satirical article, arguing that he never suffered any loss because he voluntarily retired.

  • February 20, 2024

    Insurers Say Pollution Exclusion Bars Cancer Suits Defense

    An oil company accused of causing four people to develop cancer through exposure to harmful chemicals should not have coverage for its defense of the claims, according to four Nationwide units that told an Illinois federal court the company has no pollution coverage.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 16, 2024

    Unshackled Calif. Privacy Agency To Bring Enforcement Heat

    California's privacy regulator is expected to not waste any time responding to a recent ruling that cleared the way for the fledgling agency to begin immediately enforcing the rules it's crafted under the state's data protection law, making it vital for businesses and employers to adjust their compliance efforts to meet the accelerated timeline. 

  • February 16, 2024

    Nat'l Security Bar Kills Ex-Raytheon Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The Fifth Circuit on Thursday refused to revive an engineer's claims that he was fired by defense contractor Raytheon for raising concerns about a naval system, saying that reviewing the case would implicate the Pentagon's protected decision to revoke his security clearance.

  • February 16, 2024

    Swimmers Tell 9th Circ. New League Was Boycotted

    The International Swimming League and swimmers urged the Ninth Circuit on Friday to revive their certified class antitrust claims against the sport's international governing body over its alleged 2018 "boycott" of an ISL event, arguing the lower court erred in finding the organization's actions didn't constitute a boycott.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Wary Of Boeing's Bid To Duck Birth Defect Suit

    A Washington state judge pressed Boeing on Friday to explain why it should get a "free pass" in a lawsuit over birth defects allegedly caused by factory workers' chemical exposure, questioning the aerospace giant's argument that it didn't have a duty to workers' future children based on foreseeable harm.

  • February 16, 2024

    Judge Says Athletes' Social Media Held 'Hostage' In NCAA Suit

    Former University of San Francisco baseball players cannot hold their social media messages "hostage" in a lawsuit that accuses the NCAA of enabling the sexual harassment they allegedly endured at the hands of two coaches, an Indiana magistrate judge ruled Thursday.

  • February 16, 2024

    NCAA, Hoopster Settle Dispute Over Betting Suspension

    The NCAA has settled a lawsuit brought by a Rutgers University basketball player who sued the organization earlier this month over claims it was trying to make him live out a punishment for sports betting violations that he had already served while a student-athlete at Iowa State University.

  • February 16, 2024

    Littler Hit With DQ Bid For Wielding Mistakenly Produced Doc

    Littler Mendelson PC has gained an "unfair advantage" and should be booted from defending a Florida pharmacy services company for using an inadvertently produced, privileged document in a deposition last week, a woman suing the company for whistleblower retaliation said.

  • February 16, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Employment Pro From San Diego Boutique

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, now known as GRSM50, is bolstering its employment team, bringing in a Keeney Waite & Stevens APC business litigator as a partner in its San Diego office.

  • February 15, 2024

    SpaceX Heads To Texas After Musk's Tesla Pay Package Axed

    Elon Musk announced Wednesday that he is taking SpaceX's business incorporation from Delaware to Texas, after Delaware's chancellor last month struck down his proposed $55 billion Tesla pay package.

Expert Analysis

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

    Author Photo

    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • Reassessing Trade Secrets Amid Proposed Noncompete Ban

    Author Photo

    The Federal Trade Commission's proposed ban on noncompete agreements as well as state bans make it prudent for businesses to reevaluate and reinvigorate approaches to trade secret protection, including knowing what information employees are providing to vendors, and making sure confidentiality agreements are put in place before information is shared, says Rob Jensen at Wolf Greenfield.

  • Considering The Logical Extremes Of Your Legal Argument

    Author Photo

    Recent oral arguments in the federal election interference case against former President Donald Trump highlighted the age-old technique of extending an argument to its logical limit — a principle that is still important for attorneys to consider in preparing their cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Will Guide Social Media Account Ownership

    Author Photo

    The Second Circuit’s recent decision in JLM Couture v. Gutman — which held that ownership of social media accounts must be resolved using traditional property law analysis — will guide employers and employees alike in future cases, and underscores the importance of express agreements in establishing ownership of social media accounts, says Joshua Glasgow at Phillips Lytle.

  • Storytelling Strategies To Defuse Courtroom Conspiracies

    Author Photo

    Misinformation continues to proliferate in all sectors of society, including in the courtroom, as jurors try to fill in the gaps of incomplete trial narratives — underscoring the need for attorneys to tell a complete, consistent and credible story before and during trial, says David Metz at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • HR Antitrust Compliance Crucial Amid DOJ Scrutiny

    Author Photo

    The Justice Department's Antitrust Division recently announced a required human resources component for antitrust compliance programs, which means companies should evaluate their policies to prevent, detect and remediate potential violations as they add training for HR professionals, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Calif. Disclosure Update Adds To Employer Trial Prep Burden

    Author Photo

    Though California’s recently updated litigation disclosure procedures may streamline some aspects of employment suits filed in the state, plaintiffs' new ability to demand a wider range of information on a tighter timeline will burden companies with the need to invest more resources into investigating cases much earlier in the process, says Jeffrey Horton Thomas at Fox Rothschild.

  • Mass Arb. Rule Changes May Be A Hindrance For Consumers

    Author Photo

    The American Arbitration Association's recent changes to its mass arbitration supplementary rules and fee schedule, including a shift from filing fees to initiation and per-case fees, may reduce consumers' ability to counteract businesses' mandatory arbitration agreements, say Eduard Korsinsky and Alexander Krot at Levi & Korsinsky.

  • 3 Principles For Minimizing The Risk Of A Nuclear Verdict

    Author Photo

    In one of the latest examples of so-called nuclear verdicts, a single plaintiff was awarded $2.25 billion in a jury trial against Monsanto — revealing the need for defense attorneys to prioritize trust, connection and simplicity when communicating with modern juries, say Jenny Hergenrother and Mia Falzarano at Alston & Bird.

  • Coaching High School Wrestling Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Coaching my son’s high school wrestling team has been great fun, but it’s also demonstrated how a legal career can benefit from certain experiences, such as embracing the unknown, studying the rules and engaging with new people, says Richard Davis at Maynard Nexsen.

  • SG's Office Is Case Study To Help Close Legal Gender Gap

    Author Photo

    As women continue to be underrepresented in the upper echelons of the legal profession, law firms could learn from the example set by the Office of the Solicitor General, where culture and workplace policies have helped foster greater gender equality, say attorneys at Ocean Tomo.

  • The Latest Antitrust Areas For In-House Counsel To Watch

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission's increasingly aggressive approach to antitrust enforcement means in-house counsel should closely monitor five key compliance issues, say attorneys at Squire Patton.

  • Googling Prospective Jurors Is Usually A Fool's Errand

    Author Photo

    Though a Massachusetts federal court recently barred Google from Googling potential jurors in a patent infringement case, the company need not worry about missing evidence of bias, because internet research of jury pools usually doesn’t yield the most valuable information — voir dire and questionnaires do, says Sarah Murray at Trialcraft.