Discrimination

  • April 04, 2024

    Ex-Ariz. Cardinals VP Sues Team After $3M Arbitration Award

    A former vice president with the Arizona Cardinals and two family members have filed a defamation suit in Arizona state court against the NFL team, its owner and the public relations company and law firm they retained, following the ex-VP's $3 million award in a defamation grievance against them with the league.

  • April 04, 2024

    Boston-Based AI Company Ends Laid-Off Worker's Bias Suit

    An artificial intelligence company and a former employee agreed to end her suit alleging she was unlawfully laid off because she is a Hispanic single mother with post-traumatic stress disorder who complained that the company was "cooking the books," according to a filing in California federal court.

  • April 04, 2024

    GRSM50 Accused Of Letting Detroit Hotel Hide Evidence

    Former workers at an upscale Detroit hotel suing over their firings urged a Michigan federal judge on Wednesday to sanction the club and disqualify its attorneys at Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, alleging it is likely they helped withhold documents and try to intimidate witnesses.

  • April 04, 2024

    Pierson Ferdinand Brings On Morgan Lewis Litigator In Philly

    Newly formed Pierson Ferdinand LLP has added a high-stakes employment litigator to its Philadelphia office from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP.

  • April 04, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Upend Oil Pipeline Co.'s Win In Age Bias Suit

    The Fifth Circuit backed a jury verdict in favor of an oil pipeline company over allegations it fired a 64-year-old driver because of his age, rejecting the worker's claim that the district court improperly allowed potential jurors to be eliminated because they were Hispanic.

  • April 04, 2024

    'Real Housewives' Assault Case Legally Deficient, Court Told

    Bravo, NBCUniversal and Warner Bros. have asked a Manhattan judge to toss a suit brought by a former "Real Housewives" cast member who claimed she was sexually assaulted while filming in Morocco, arguing her claims were filed in the wrong jurisdiction and past a one-year statute of limitations.

  • April 04, 2024

    11th Circ. Backs Toss Of Haitian Worker's Bias Suit

    The Eleventh Circuit declined to reinstate a Haitian former worker's suit accusing a Florida county's corrections department of removing him from his station after he reported managers for sexually harassing a female officer, saying his suit was filled with vague and immaterial facts.

  • April 04, 2024

    Exec Says Disney Filmmaker Fired Her For Bias Complaints

    A filmmaker for ABC and Disney repeatedly ignored a multiracial development director's complaints that she was underpaid and eventually fired her for speaking up about bias and harassment she faced on the job, she said in a suit in California state court.

  • April 03, 2024

    9th Circ. Skeptical Of ADA Suit Against Buddhist Temple

    The Ninth Circuit appeared hesitant Wednesday to revive a former live-in apprentice's disability bias suit against a Buddhist temple, with a panel suggesting that his maintenance duties didn't place him outside the scope of a ministerial exception to anti-discrimination law.

  • April 03, 2024

    UMich Says Law Prof's FMLA Leave Can't Prevent Discipline

    The University of Michigan told a federal judge Wednesday that a law professor's need for medical leave did not mean administrators couldn't discipline her for allegedly walking out on certain teaching responsibilities, rebutting her claims that the university's actions were because of her race or gender.

  • April 03, 2024

    Bank Wraps Up Ex-VP's Age Discrimination Suit

    A community bank reached an agreement with a former senior vice president to end his age bias lawsuit accusing the bank of forcing him into a rigorous interview process and then replacing him with someone 20 years his junior, the parties told a Florida federal court Wednesday.

  • April 03, 2024

    BlackBerry Fired Worker Harassed By Executive, Suit Says

    BlackBerry swept away a former employee's allegations that an executive sexually harassed her and then fired her to make way for his ascension to CEO, according to a complaint filed Wednesday in California federal court.

  • April 03, 2024

    Hospital Workers' Vax Free Speech Suit Falls Flat At 6th Circ.

    The Sixth Circuit backed the dismissal of two workers' claims that a children's hospital violated their constitutional rights when it rejected their religious objections to a COVID-19 vaccine mandate, saying Wednesday they failed to show the hospital was a government actor.

  • April 03, 2024

    2nd Circ. Puts Metro-North Race Bias Suit Back On Track

    The Second Circuit revived a Black former conductor's lawsuit claiming Metro-North fired him after a 2018 train collision while white workers involved were allowed to keep their jobs, finding on Wednesday that the trial court made assumptions that should have been left for later in the case.

  • April 03, 2024

    3rd Circ. Urges Crane Co., Ex-Worker To Settle Disability Case

    A Third Circuit panel seemed sympathetic Wednesday to an injured machinery worker who sued his former employer for disability discrimination but urged the parties to give mediation another shot, ending oral arguments by referring them to the court's chief circuit mediator.

  • April 03, 2024

    1st Circ. Hints Trader Joe's Age Bias Case Fit For Jury

    A pair of First Circuit judges on Wednesday suggested that an 80-year-old former Trader Joe's employee should have gotten the chance to bring her age discrimination claims to trial after she was fired for buying beer for her underage grandson.

  • April 03, 2024

    NY Public Radio Must Face Black Ex-Host's Race Bias Claims

    A New York federal judge refused to end a Black former New York Public Radio host's suit alleging she lost out on promotions for complaining about racial bias before being accused of plagiarism and quitting, ruling she put forward enough detail to keep the majority of her case in play.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ye Spewed Anti-Jewish And LGBTQ Hate, Fired Worker Says

    Rapper Ye, his companies and Donda Academy were hit with a discrimination suit in California state court Tuesday by a former employee who accuses Ye of threatening to cage students, spewing hateful rhetoric against Jewish people and the LGBTQ community, and treating Black employees far worse than white staffers.

  • April 02, 2024

    Ga. Judge Tosses Ex-Police Chief's Retaliation Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has freed the city of Austell from a lawsuit brought against it by its former police chief, who alleged that he was forced out of his job after three years of raising concerns about the safety of department facilities.

  • April 02, 2024

    Security Guard Co. Settles DOJ's Immigration Bias Probe

    Nationwide security guard company Securitas Security Services USA Inc. has agreed to pay $175,000 to resolve investigations into its hiring practices that the U.S. Department of Justice was conducting after it received a complaint that the firm was discriminating against non-U.S. citizens, the government announced Tuesday.

  • April 02, 2024

    ZeniMax Escapes Trans Ex-Worker's Coverage Denial Suit

    A Maryland federal judge granted video game developer ZeniMax's bid to toss a transgender ex-employee's suit claiming the business didn't uphold promises it would continue her health coverage after she left the company because of harassment, saying she didn't show that federal benefits laws were violated.

  • April 02, 2024

    Palestinian Worker Says Gaza Sympathies Got Her Fired

    A consulting company unlawfully fired a Muslim Palestinian worker after she criticized an email from the CEO that expressed support for Israel and ignored the climbing death toll in Gaza, the worker told a Washington federal court.

  • April 02, 2024

    Calif. Bill Would Provide After-Hours 'Right To Disconnect'

    A California state lawmaker has introduced a first-of-its-kind bill that would give workers the right to ignore emails, text messages and phone calls from their employers after they clock out.

  • April 02, 2024

    Major Lindsey Accused Of Targeting Atty Who Sued Troutman

    Legal recruiter Major Lindsey & Africa was hit with a lawsuit on Tuesday claiming it internally "blackballed" a midlevel associate who sued Troutman Pepper for racial discrimination, thereby putting the lie to Major Lindsey's "claims to champion diversity" and making the firm an "accomplice" to "systemic race discrimination" in the legal industry.

  • April 02, 2024

    Littler Adds Jackson Lewis Employment Pro In San Diego

    Littler Mendelson PC has added a shareholder in its San Diego office from Jackson Lewis PC, bringing on an attorney who has more than a decade of experience representing employers in both state and federal matters.

Expert Analysis

  • What Employers Can Learn From EEOC's 2023 ADA Priorities

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    Between a spike in Americans with Disabilities Act suits filed by the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission in 2023 and the agency’s newly released priorities, the EEOC has provided employers a preview of several ADA issues — like web accessibility, pregnancy discrimination and inflexible policies — it will likely focus enforcement on next year, says Stacy Bunck at Ogletree.

  • Eye On Compliance: EEOC Focus On Workplace AI

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    With the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recent guidance and enforcement focus on the use of artificial intelligence tools during the hiring process and other job-related assessments, companies should be mindful that anti-discrimination laws apply equally to both human- and AI-generated decisions, say Laura Stutz and Lisa Ackerman at Wilson Elser.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Sets Bostock, Faith Exemption Up For Review

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    The Fifth Circuit's Braidwood v. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission decision could tee up U.S. Supreme Court review of whether employing an individual to whose protected class the employer objects infringes on the employer's religious beliefs, potentially narrowing LGBTQ worker protections from the high court's 2020 Bostock v. Clayton County decision, says Adam Grogan at Bell Law.

  • Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

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    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Why Employers Should Refrain From 'Quiet Firing'

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    While quiet firing — when an employer deliberately makes working conditions intolerable with the goal of forcing an employee to quit — has recently been identified in the news as a new trend, such constructive discharge tactics have been around for ages, and employers would do well to remember that, comparatively, direct firings may provide more legal protection, says Robin Shea at Constangy.

  • 5 New Calif. Laws Employers Need To Know

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    Now is a good time for employers to evaluate personnel rules to keep pace with California’s newly adopted employee protections, which go into effect early next year and include laws regarding reproductive loss leave, cannabis use, workplace violence prevention and noncompete agreements, say attorneys at Farella Braun.

  • 3 Employer Strategies To Streamline Mass Arbitrations

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    Workers under arbitration agreements have gained an edge on their employers by filing floods of tedious and expensive individualized claims, but companies can adapt to this new world of mass arbitration by applying several new strategies that may streamline the dispute-resolution process, says Michael Strauss at Alternative Resolution Centers.

  • How AI 'Cultural Fit' Assessments Can Be Analyzed For Bias

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    Attorneys at Sanford Heisler explore how the use of artificial intelligence to assess workplace cultural fit may provide employees with increased opportunities to challenge biased hiring practices, and employers with more potential to mitigate against bias in algorithmic evaluations.

  • High Court's Old, Bad Stats Analysis Can Miss Discrimination

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    Courts and practitioners should reconsider a common statistical test for evidence of employment discrimination, created by the U.S. Supreme Court for its 1977 Castaneda and Hazelwood cases, because its “two or three standard deviations” criteria stems from a misunderstanding of statistical methods that can dramatically minimize the actual prevalence of discrimination, says Daniel Levy at Advanced Analytical Consulting Group.

  • Transparency And Explainability Are Critical To AI Compliance

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    Although there is not yet a comprehensive law governing artificial intelligence, regulators have tools to hold businesses accountable, and companies need to focus on ensuring that consumers and key stakeholders understand how their AI systems operate and make decisions, say Chanley Howell and Lauren Hudon at Foley & Lardner.

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Emerging And Developing Issues

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's recently finalized strategic enforcement plan highlights how the agency will prioritize its limited resources over the next four years, and the most notable emerging issues include ensuring protections for pregnant workers and those dealing with long-term COVID-19 effects, says Jim Paretti at Littler.

  • Employer Takeaways From 2nd Circ. Equal Pay Ruling

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    The Second Circuit 's recent decision in Eisenhauer v. Culinary Institute of America reversed a long-held understanding of the Equal Pay Act, ultimately making it easier for employers to defend against equal pay claims brought under federal law, but it is not a clear escape hatch for employers, say Thelma Akpan and Katelyn McCombs at Littler.

  • AI Isn't The Wild West, So Prepare Now For Bias Risks

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    In addition to President Joe Biden's recent historic executive order on safe, secure and trustworthy artificial intelligence, there are existing federal and state laws prohibiting fraud, defamation and even discrimination, so companies considering using or developing AI should take steps to minimize legal and business risks, says civil rights attorney Farhana Khera.