Discrimination

  • April 12, 2024

    11th Circ. Axes Religious Bias Suit Against LinkedIn

    An Eleventh Circuit panel on Friday tossed a Florida woman's suit claiming LinkedIn banned her for spreading COVID-19 vaccine misinformation, finding she abandoned her appeal by failing to support her arguments.

  • April 12, 2024

    Chicago Water Workers' Race Bias Suit Headed To Trial

    The City of Chicago can't dodge a lawsuit alleging its water management department created a work environment replete with racist slurs and subjected Black workers to harsher punishment than white colleagues, with an Illinois federal judge ruling Friday the workers provided enough evidence to proceed to trial.

  • April 12, 2024

    What Employers Should Know About Fla., Ariz. Abortion Bans

    Recent state supreme court decisions approving strict abortion bans in Arizona and Florida will have effects that are felt in the workplace, experts said, warning that employers should be prepared to accommodate workers and deal with disagreements. Here, Law360 looks at four things employers in those states, and in others that have implemented or may implement abortion bans, should be prepared to tackle.

  • April 12, 2024

    Whole Foods Illegally Sought Group Chats, NLRB Judge Says

    Whole Foods illegally requested group chat messages between a fired employee and co-workers as part of a Title VII case now before the First Circuit, a National Labor Relations Board judge ruled, finding the co-workers have a right to shield communications about their protected activities.

  • April 12, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: Twitter Wants Age Bias Suit Tossed

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for the potential dismissal of a proposed age discrimination class and collective action against Twitter Inc. and its successor, X Corp. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • April 12, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Tech Co. Retaliation Suit

    This week, the Second Circuit will consider a former marketing manager's lawsuit claiming that the head of the technology company where she worked sexually harassed her and that she was fired after she refused his advances. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • April 12, 2024

    Off-Road Vehicle Dealer Strikes Deal In EEOC Sex Bias Suit

    A motor sports retailer will settle a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging it told a female sales manager her role was being scrapped and fired her, only to replace her with a less-experienced man, according to a filing in Oklahoma federal court.

  • April 11, 2024

    4th Circ. Backs Navy's Win In Black Employee's Bias Case

    The Fourth Circuit refused to upend the U.S. Navy's defeat of a Black civilian employee's lawsuit alleging he lost a promotion because he'd complained about being treated worse than white colleagues, finding Thursday he failed to overcome the government's reasoning that another candidate had better qualifications.

  • April 11, 2024

    Split 6th Circ. Upends Jail Worker's $1.5M Win In USERRA Suit

    A split Sixth Circuit panel on Thursday overturned a former county jail employee's $1.5 million jury trial win in his lawsuit alleging he was wrongly accused of taking invalid military leave and then fired, despite a dissent calling the majority's finding that he waived his right to sue "deplorable."

  • April 11, 2024

    Jewish Attys Sue Union Over Dues After Pro-Palestine Stance

    A public defenders union violated the First Amendment by forcing two Jewish attorneys who oppose its pro-Palestine rhetoric to continue paying dues, the New York City-based attorneys claimed in a federal lawsuit filed Thursday, naming the city and their employer as defendants as well.

  • April 11, 2024

    Full 8th Circ. Hears Ark. Bid To Revive Youth Trans Care Ban

    An en banc panel of the Eighth Circuit weighing whether to revive an Arkansas state law that banned gender-affirming care for children and teens heard oral arguments Thursday, as Arkansas officials sought to demonstrate that the law does not unconstitutionally discriminate based on sex.

  • April 11, 2024

    2nd Circ. Rules Flores Can't Block NFL's Arbitration Challenge

    The Second Circuit on Thursday handed the NFL a win in its effort to overturn a decision that kept former Miami Dolphins head coach Brian Flores' racial discrimination lawsuit out of arbitration, ruling Flores cannot cross-appeal the NFL's appeal of a lower court decision leaving the suit in federal court.

  • April 11, 2024

    Black Workers, Fish Farm Settle Claims Of Migrant Hiring Bias

    Black farmers and a Mississippi-based fish farm have agreed to settle claims that the farm pushed out the U.S. citizen farmers in favor of Mexican migrant workers, they announced to a Mississippi federal court on Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Partisan Split On Display As EEOC Makes Policy Strides

    Since gaining a Democratic majority in August, the five-seat U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission found common ground on age and race bias claims, but split down party lines on all of its major regulatory moves and cases addressing emerging issues like LGBTQ bias.

  • April 11, 2024

    Supermarket Chain Settles Fired Manager's Sex Bias Suit

    A supermarket chain will pay a former store manager $25,000 to shutter her New York federal court suit claiming she was paid less than her male counterparts, and she was fired after complaining that her male supervisor favored those male colleagues, according to a Thursday filing.

  • April 11, 2024

    Texas Staffing Co. Settles Noncitizen Bias Claims

    A Texas staffing company settled the federal government's claims that it discriminated against a man by requiring he show his green card to prove he can work in the U.S., the U.S. Department of Justice announced Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-COO Sues NJ Law Firm, Claiming Sexual Harassment

    The former chief operating officer of New Jersey personal injury giant Garces Grabler & LeBrocq PC sued the firm Wednesday for sexual harassment and discrimination, alleging firm leaders unfairly impeded her from doing her job and made lewd comments about her.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-NFL Players Near Settlement In Race-Norming Benefits Suit

    Two former players whose lawsuit accuses the NFL's disability benefit plans of awarding them lower benefits because they are Black told a Maryland federal court they have had "productive" meetings with the defendants and are near a settlement proposal.

  • April 11, 2024

    Tech Co. To Pay Ex-Worker $7K To End Anxiety Firing Suit

    A computer and cellphone accessory manufacturer will pay nearly $7,000 to end a former worker's suit alleging unpaid overtime as well as a failure to accommodate her extreme anxiety, a Georgia federal judge ordered Thursday, approving the deal.

  • April 11, 2024

    Medical Co. Owes Ex-Worker $20M For Race Bias, Jury Says

    A ventilator supply company should pay a Black former customer service representative more than $20 million for failing to intervene when her supervisor used racist slurs and acted aggressively toward her, a Pennsylvania federal jury said.

  • April 11, 2024

    Eye Care Company Settles EEOC Sex Harassment Probe

    A Colorado-based eye care company struck a deal with the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission to end an agency investigation into allegations that the company's owner sexually harassed an employee until that employee quit, the EEOC said Thursday.

  • April 11, 2024

    Ex-Ellenoff Grossman Atty Faces Possible Firing Suit Remand

    A former Ellenoff Grossman & Schole LLP associate's suit saying she was fired for protesting sexual harassment should return to state court, a New York federal judge recommended, saying the federal court can't enforce arbitration pacts invalidated by a 2022 amendment to the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 11, 2024

    United Airlines Defeats Religious Bias Suit Over Vax Mandate

    United Airlines workers failed to furnish "basic factual details" to back up their case alleging the airline discriminated against employees for their religious beliefs by requiring a COVID-19 vaccination, an Illinois federal judge said, tossing the suit.

  • April 11, 2024

    Apple Must Face Former Executive's Trimmed Age Bias Suit

    A California federal judge narrowed a former Apple executive's suit alleging his age led the company to withhold bonuses, though the suit stands, as the judge said it sufficiently showed a contract was breached when the company did not pay a hefty stock retention bonus.

  • April 10, 2024

    Disney Defends Right To Fire 'Star Wars' Actor Over X Posts

    The Walt Disney Co. and Lucasfilm Ltd. asked a California federal judge to toss Gina Carano's claims that she was unlawfully fired from "The Mandalorian" for her social media posts, arguing they have a constitutional right as artistic creators to decide which actors to employ to express their artistic messages.

Expert Analysis

  • In Focus At The EEOC: Preserving Legal System Access

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    The track records of and public commentary from U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission leaders — including two recently confirmed Democratic appointees — can provide insight into how the agency may approach access to justice priorities, as identified in its latest strategic enforcement plan, says Aniko Schwarcz at Cohen Milstein.

  • Mitigating Compliance And Litigation Risks Of Evolving Tech

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    Amid artificial intelligence and other technological advances, companies must prepare for the associated risks, including a growing suite of privacy regulations, enterprising class action theories and consumer protection challenges, and proliferating disclosure obligations, say attorneys at Eversheds Sutherland.

  • Where Justices Stand On Chevron Doctrine Post-Argument

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    Following recent oral argument at the U.S. Supreme Court, at least four justices appear to be in favor of overturning the long-standing Chevron deference, and three justices seem ready to uphold it, which means the ultimate decision may rest on Chief Justice John Roberts' vote, say Wayne D'Angelo and Zachary Lee at Kelley Drye.

  • A Focused Statement Can Ease Employment Mediation

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    Given the widespread use of mediation in employment cases, attorneys should take steps to craft mediation statements that efficiently assist the mediator by focusing on key issues, strengths and weaknesses of a claim, which can flag key disputes and barriers to a settlement, says Darren Rumack at Klein & Cardali.

  • Vaccine Accommodation Suits Show Risk Of Blanket Policies

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    A recent federal class action alleging Tyson Foods inappropriately applied a one-size-fits-all response to Arkansas employees seeking religious COVID-19 vaccine exemptions, with similar suits going back to 2022, should remind employers to individually consider every worker request for a religious accommodation, say Christopher Pardo and Elizabeth Sherwood at Hunton.

  • Workplace Challenges Amid Israeli-Palestinian Conflict

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    Recent tension over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict has caused challenges in the employment sphere, sparking the question of whether employees can be legally disciplined for speaking out on issues related to the conflict, which depends on various circumstances, says Alok Nadig at Sanford Heisler.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Insights On Noncompetes From 'The Office'

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    Troutman Pepper’s Tracey Diamond, Evan Gibbs, Constance Brewster and Jim Earle compare scenarios from “The Office” to the complex world of noncompetes and associated tax issues, as employers are becoming increasingly hesitant to look to noncompete provisions amid a potential federal ban.

  • High Court's Job Bias Questions May Predict Title VII Ruling

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    Employers may be able to predict — and prepare for — important changes to workplace discrimination laws by examining the questions the U.S. Supreme Court asked during oral arguments for Muldrow v. St. Louis, where several justices seemed to favor a low threshold for Title VII suits, says Wendy LaManque at Pryor Cashman.

  • 2 Cases Highlight NJ Cannabis Employment Law Uncertainties

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    More than two years after its enactment, the employee protections and employer obligations in New Jersey's Cannabis Regulatory, Enforcement Assistance and Marketplace Modernization Act remain unsettled, and two recent lawsuits draw attention to the law's enforceability and its intersection with federal law, say Ruth Rauls at Saul Ewing and David White at Seton Hall.

  • 3 Compliance Reminders For Calif. Employers In 2024

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    As we enter into the new year, several recent updates to California employment law — including minimum wage and sick leave requirements — necessitate immediate compliance actions for employers, says Daniel Pyne at Hopkins & Carley.

  • Sex Harassment Arbitration Exemption: Devil Is In The Date

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    A Federal Arbitration Act amendment that exempts workplace sexual harassment claims from arbitration is muddled in ongoing confusion about its chronological reach — and as many such cases begin to run up against applicable statutes of limitations, the clock is ticking for claimants to bring their actions in court, says Abe Melamed at Signature Resolution.

  • Top 10 Employer Resolutions For 2024

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    From technological leaps to sea changes in labor policy to literal sea changes, 2024 provides opportunities for employers to face big-picture questions that will shape their business for years to come, say Allegra Lawrence-Hardy and Lisa Haldar at Lawrence & Bundy.

  • Lessons Learned From 2023's Top FMLA Decisions

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    This year’s most significant Family and Medical Leave Act decisions offer lessons on the act's technical requirements, including the definition of serious health condition, compliance with notice requirements and whether it is permissible to give an employee substantial extra work upon their return from leave, says Linda Dwoskin at Dechert.