Discrimination

  • May 13, 2024

    Oil Co. Ends EEOC Disability Bias Suit Over Opioid Meds

    An oilfield equipment supplier will pay $35,000 to end a suit in Texas federal court by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing it of yanking a job offer from a welder because of his opioid use disorder medication, the EEOC said.

  • May 13, 2024

    High Court Skips White Law Prof's Bias Suits Against HBCU

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Monday that it won't review a white former law professor's unsuccessful suits alleging she was harassed out of her job for challenging race-and-gender-based wage inequities at a historically Black university, despite her argument that the Fifth Circuit flouted precedent when it axed her complaints.

  • May 13, 2024

    High Court Won't Consider Ex-Tufts Prof's Retaliation Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court declined Monday to review a lawsuit brought by a former Tufts University dental professor who said the First Circuit ignored crucial evidence and relied on false information when it shut down claims that she lost a promotion for reporting sexual harassment.

  • May 10, 2024

    3 Things To Know After NJ Nondisparagement Pact Ruling

    The New Jersey Supreme Court recently dealt a severe blow against the use of nondisparagement clauses in deals resolving workplace discrimination claims, with experts saying the justices' stance clears up an ambiguity in state anti-bias law that will result in greater scrutiny being placed on the wording of settlements. Here, experts discuss three things to know about the state high court's ruling.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fla. Agency Forced Resignation Over Mental Illness, Suit Says

    A former employee of a Florida insurance regulatory agency is suing her onetime employer in federal court, alleging a supervisor made her quit after falsely suspecting she may have bipolar disorder.

  • May 10, 2024

    McDonald's Workers Want Class Cert. In Sex Harassment Suit

    A pair of McDonald's workers claiming that the company has allowed sexual harassment to run rampant in its stores asked an Illinois federal judge to certify classes of thousands of women and girls who've worked at Florida locations, arguing that class treatment is the best way to evaluate whether McDonald's has a pattern of tolerating harassment.

  • May 10, 2024

    Mich. Justices Find State Law Bars Firing Friend As Reprisal

    The Michigan Supreme Court held Friday that the state's civil rights law prohibits employers from retaliating against an employee by targeting a coworker who is a friend or family member, reviving two former prison workers' lawsuit against the state.

  • May 10, 2024

    Black Doctor Must Arbitrate Bias Claims Against Hospice Co.

    A Black doctor must arbitrate her claims that she was mistreated by non-Black colleagues at a home healthcare company and fired after raising concerns that it was sidestepping Medicare billing regulations, a California federal judge ruled, finding an arbitration agreement she signed is legitimate.

  • May 10, 2024

    Construction Co. Shakes Black Ex-Worker's Bias Suit

    A Washington federal judge granted a win Friday to a construction company in a Black ex-worker's lawsuit, saying he failed to show he was forced to quit because he complained about his manager's racist comments and not because of the 18 safety warnings he received.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ex-Wayfair Web Designer Says Racism Forced Him Out

    A Black former Wayfair web designer says he faced a workplace "infused by racial discrimination" during his two years with the Boston-based online retailer and suffered retaliation when he complained, according to a suit filed Friday in Massachusetts state court.

  • May 10, 2024

    Disney Can't Dodge Biased Firing Suit, 'Star Wars' Actor Says

    An actor featured in "Star Wars" spin-off series "The Mandalorian" urged a California federal judge to reject Disney's bid to dismiss her suit alleging she was illegally fired for sharing her political views on social media, arguing the company hasn't shown that her posts impeded its artistic expression.

  • May 10, 2024

    X Denies Post-Acquisition Policies Biased Against Women

    X Corp. denied that Elon Musk implemented policies intended to push out women after he took over the social network formerly known as Twitter, telling a California federal court that any layoffs or actions it took were within the confines of the law.

  • May 10, 2024

    Fox Theatre Let Sex Harassment Go Unchecked, Suit Says

    A former worker at Atlanta's Fox Theatre filed a lawsuit this week accusing the historic venue of allowing sexual harassment to run rampant among its ranks, refusing to discipline employees who made lewd comments — and worse — while retaliating against those who complained.

  • May 10, 2024

    Ga. Dept. Of Law, Ex-Paralegal Settle Race Discrimination Suit

    A Georgia federal judge has closed a former paralegal's discrimination and retaliation case against the Georgia Department of Law and a former deputy attorney general now working as a Cobb County Superior Court judge, saying a settlement has been reached. 

  • May 10, 2024

    What To Know About Biden's ACA Nondiscrimination Rule

    Recently finalized regulations tackling what constitutes discrimination under the Affordable Care Act could have significant impacts on health plans that include greater liability for third-party plan administrators, attorneys say. Here are three things employers should know now that the final rule is on the books.

  • May 10, 2024

    NY Forecast: 2nd Circ. Hears Police Officer's Bias Case

    This week, the Second Circuit is scheduled to consider a former Ramapo, New York, police officer's lawsuit claiming the town discriminated against her on the basis of her race and gender when it did not assign her a light duty assignment after she returned to the job from an injury. Here, Law360 explores this and other cases on the docket in New York.

  • May 10, 2024

    King & Spalding Accused Of Anti-White, Pro-LGBTQ Bias

    A straight white woman is suing King & Spalding LLP alleging discrimination after getting the green light from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, claiming she incurred "significant damages" when she was dissuaded from applying to a summer associate program open only to "diverse" applicants.

  • May 10, 2024

    Axl Rose Shouldn't Escape NY Sex Assault Suit, Model Says

    A former Penthouse model is urging a New York state court not to toss her case alleging Axl Rose sexually assaulted her in 1989, arguing the Guns N' Roses lead singer is making faulty arguments about attempts to serve him with the suit to avoid accountability.

  • May 10, 2024

    Calif. Forecast: 9th Circ. To Hear Ex-Chief's Free Speech Args

    In the coming week, attorneys should keep an eye out for Ninth Circuit oral arguments in a former police chief's First Amendment case. Here's a look at that case and other labor and employment matters on deck in California.

  • May 10, 2024

    Mont. Utility Co. Ends EEOC Sex Harassment Suit In $50K Deal

    A utility company has agreed to hand over $50,000 to end a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit filed in Montana federal court claiming it pushed an employee out of her job after she complained that her supervisor propositioned her for sex, the agency announced.

  • May 10, 2024

    Climate Group Settles DOJ Claims It Shut Out Noncitizens

    A Massachusetts-based nonprofit organization focused on climate action agreed to settle claims it discriminated against non-U.S. citizen job seekers including asylees and green-card holders by inviting only U.S. citizens to apply for jobs, the U.S. Department of Justice announced.

  • May 09, 2024

    Judge 'Tempted' To Transfer MLB Scouts' Colo. Age Bias Suit

    A Colorado federal judge said Thursday he was "somewhat tempted" to transfer an age discrimination lawsuit brought by former MLB scouts if he ultimately decides the court doesn't have jurisdiction over out-of-state teams, despite believing they may have a "fairly strong" argument that he can oversee the case against the league itself.

  • May 09, 2024

    Rail Co. Accused Of Retaliation Over FMLA Use

    CSX Transportation Inc. has been hit with a Florida federal lawsuit brought by its workers, who allege in their proposed class action that the rail company discouraged them from lawfully using the Family and Medical Leave Act, including by punishing them for taking advantage of the law.

  • May 09, 2024

    EEOC Can't Revive Race Harassment Claims At 7th Circ.

    The Seventh Circuit rejected on Thursday the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's bid to revive claims that 15 Black workers were harassed by staff and residents at an assisted living facility because of their race, finding the mistreatment wasn't egregious enough.

  • May 09, 2024

    1st Circ. Backs EPA's Win In Worker's Retaliation Suit

    The First Circuit refused Thursday to reinstate a lawsuit from an Environmental Protection Agency employee who wasn't promoted after complaining he faced bias because he suffered from post-traumatic stress disorder, saying he hadn't shown his supervisors knew he had PTSD.

Expert Analysis

  • Cos. Should Plan To Protect DEI Before Supreme Court Ruling

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    With the U.S. Supreme Court apparently poised to reject affirmative action in education with its pending decisions in Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard and SFFA v. University of North Carolina, employers should begin preparing their response to the likely ensuing challenges to corporate diversity programs, says Keisha-Ann Gray at Proskauer.

  • Water Cooler Talk: Bias Lessons From 'Partner Track'

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    Tracey Diamond and Evan Gibbs at Troutman Pepper chat with CyberRisk Alliance's Ying Wong, about how Netflix's show "Partner Track" tackles conscious and unconscious bias at law firms, and offer some key observations for employers and their human resources departments on avoiding these biases.

  • Accommodating Disabled Employees Is Rarely A Hardship

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    Since tools for granting disabled employees' reasonable accommodation requests are readily available and affordable — as illustrated by a recent U.S. Department of Labor Office of Disability Employment Policy report — it should be much harder for employers to prove undue hardship in granting these requests, says Kamran Shahabi at Valiant Law.

  • Minimizing Discrimination Risks In Export Control Compliance

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    A recently issued U.S. Department of Justice fact sheet on avoiding immigration-related discrimination in U.S. export control compliance should help employers learn to walk a tightrope to ensure their good faith compliance efforts do not unintentionally create risks, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Employers Need Clarity On FLSA Joint Employer Liability

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    A judicial patchwork of multifactor tests to determine joint employment liability has led to unpredictable results, and only congressional action or enactment of a uniform standard to which courts will consistently defer can give employers the clarity needed to structure their relationships with workers, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Prepare For Federal Agency Scrutiny On AI Discrimination

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    A recent joint statement highlights several federal regulatory agencies' intent to scrutinize organizations' use of artificial intelligence technology under their existing mandates, so companies that build or use such systems should carefully ensure legal compliance to avoid potential bias and discrimination issues, say Tara Emory, Mike Kearney and Nick Snavely at Redgrave.

  • Employee Termination Lessons After 4th Circ. Bias Case

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    A Fourth Circuit panel's recent dismissal of discrimination and retaliation claims in Lashley v. Spartanburg Methodist College provides insights for employers on how to handle terminations, particularly when performance concerns and medical history are involved, says Heidi Siegmund at McGuireWoods.

  • Tips On Workplace DEI Efforts In A Changing Legal Landscape

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    Amid years of political debates about diversity, equity, inclusion and accessibility efforts in the workplace, and increased state legislation in this area, employers can still explore ways to engage in DEIA training and initiatives without creating unnecessary legal risks, say attorneys at Husch Blackwell.

  • Changes To Note In Revised NY Sex Harassment Model Policy

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    The New York State Department of Labor's recent revision of its sexual harassment model policy shows continued focus on diminishing workplace sexual harassment, and employers should consider whether their current policies need updated language about harassment, discrimination, retaliation and more, say Anna McCarthy and Edward Steve at Harter Secrest.

  • Eye On Compliance: Joint Employment

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    Madonna Herman at Wilson Elser breaks down the key job conditions that led to a recent National Labor Relations Board finding of joint employment, and explains the similar standard established under California case law — providing a guide for companies that want to minimize liability when relying on temporary and contract workers.

  • 9th Circ. Contractor Vax Ruling Widens Presidential Authority

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    In reversing an injunction against President Joe Biden's federal contractor vaccine mandate, the Ninth Circuit creates a circuit split on presidential authority, and breathes new life into the administration's attempts to implement government contract policies that are unlikely to pass in Congress, says Richard Arnholt at Bass Berry.

  • Consistency Is Key To Employer Accommodation Defenses

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    Amid the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission's two new Americans with Disabilities Act lawsuits against Walmart, and the big-box store's win in a similar case last year, employers should note that consistent application of leave and absence policies can foster stronger defenses in reasonable accommodation disputes, says Rachel Schaller at Taft Stettinius.

  • Expect The Patchwork Of AI Regulation To Grow

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    Given the unlikelihood of meaningful federal artificial intelligence legislation in the immediate future, the patchwork of state AI regulation will likely continue to grow, bringing at least two main risks for companies in the AI space, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.