Discrimination

  • May 14, 2024

    Dos And Don'ts For Accommodating Religious Dress At Work

    The U.S. Department of Justice recently sued a Texas state agency for punishing a clerical worker who refused to stop wearing a religious headscarf, a move that underscores how frequently the issue of handling religious attire at work comes up and its potential for tripping up even well-meaning employers, attorneys say. Here, experts discuss four advisable dos and don'ts for handling requests for faith-based exceptions to workplace dress and grooming codes.

  • May 14, 2024

    Ex-Tesla Worker Urges 9th Circ. To Revive Whistleblower Suit

    A former Tesla employee who says he was fired for reporting unlawful activity asked the Ninth Circuit on Tuesday to revive his Sarbanes-Oxley whistleblower claim, saying those claims aren't arbitrable, and a lower court erred when it dismissed them based on an arbitrator's findings regarding his other claims against Tesla.

  • May 14, 2024

    Insurer Says Miami Retaliation Scheme Not Covered

    An insurer for the City of Miami is seeking reimbursement of $5 million for expenses incurred in defending the city and one of its commissioners against underlying lawsuits alleging political retaliation, telling a Florida federal court that the allegations fall outside the scope of its policies.

  • May 14, 2024

    Law Firm Must Face Ex-HR Manager's Pregnancy Bias Suit

    A Florida federal judge refused Tuesday to allow a law firm to escape a former human resources manager's pregnancy discrimination suit, saying a jury should decide the dispute given the "peculiar" timing of her firing.

  • May 14, 2024

    States Accuse EEOC Of 'Smuggling' Abortion Into PWFA Rule

    Louisiana and Mississippi have sued the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission seeking to invalidate regulations implementing the Pregnant Workers Fairness Act, claiming the agency's stance that employers must provide workers accommodations if they get an abortion flouts U.S. Supreme Court precedent and the PWFA itself.

  • May 14, 2024

    Fla. City Tells Justices To Skip ADA Retirement Benefits Suit

    A Florida municipality urged the U.S. Supreme Court not to review an Eleventh Circuit decision saying former employees can't lodge disability bias suits related to post-employment benefits, arguing that the high court's input wouldn't change the outcome of a former firefighter's case.

  • May 14, 2024

    Christian Org. Staves Off Same-Sex Bias Trial With $120K Deal

    A Christian nonprofit has agreed to pay a Washington job candidate $120,000 to avoid a damages trial on claims it refused to hire her because she was in a same-sex marriage, though it said it would appeal the liability finding against it.

  • May 14, 2024

    Eli Lilly Can Challenge Collective Cert. Ruling In Age Bias Suit

    An Indiana federal judge said Eli Lilly & Co. can immediately appeal a decision certifying a collective in a suit accusing the pharmaceutical company of favoring millennials over older workers for promotions, agreeing that the Seventh Circuit should clarify the requirements for moving forward collectively.

  • May 14, 2024

    Workday's Liability Defense In AI Bias Battle Troubles Judge

    A California federal judge handling a job candidate's discrimination case over Workday's artificial intelligence-powered hiring tools seemed ready Tuesday to let the legal battle move ahead, as she expressed skepticism about the software developer's assertion that federal employment laws can't reach it.

  • May 14, 2024

    Vince McMahon Calls Accuser Hypocritical In Arbitration Push

    Embattled World Wrestling Entertainment Inc. founder Vince McMahon has characterized a former employee's bid to strike his preliminary statement from her lawsuit as meritless hypocrisy, a move that comes roughly four months after she first lodged the shocking complaint against him alleging abuse and trafficking.

  • May 14, 2024

    California Pot Worker's Suit Alleges Slurs, Unpaid Overtime

    A former worker for a cannabis cultivator and distributor is suing his former employer in California state court, saying he was fired in retaliation for reporting a work environment rife with racial discrimination.

  • May 14, 2024

    Novo Nordisk Ducks Fired Worker's Race Bias Suit

    A New Jersey federal judge granted Novo Nordisk a win in a former worker's lawsuit alleging she was fired after she complained she was passed over for an award because she's Black, saying she failed to refute the pharmaceutical company's argument that she had violated its policies.

  • May 14, 2024

    Judge Steps Down From EEOC Age, Race Bias Suit

    A Tennessee federal judge stepped down Tuesday from a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming HCA Healthcare refused to promote a researcher because he was an Asian man in his 50s, nullifying her recent decision denying the company's dismissal bid.

  • May 14, 2024

    Republican AGs Say EEOC Harassment Guidance Oversteps

    A coalition of 18 Republican state attorneys general asked a Tennessee federal judge to scrap recently finalized guidance on workplace harassment issued by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, arguing its protections surrounding gender identity amount to government overreach.

  • May 13, 2024

    'Grinch' Is Not A Protected Class, HHS Tells 4th Circ.

    The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services has urged the Fourth Circuit to reject a chemist's discrimination, hostile work environment and retaliation claims, arguing that "Grinch" is not a protected class and federal law doesn't protect an individual "from not being well-liked in the workplace."

  • May 13, 2024

    Boston Federal Judge To Be Witness In City Harassment Case

    A former Boston city employee will be allowed to call a senior federal judge to testify about a conversation the two had months before she reported being sexually harassed by a former city health director, a state court has ruled.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ariz. Casino Can't Claim Immunity In Discrimination Row

    Sovereign immunity can't protect a Harrah's casino operated on Arizona Native American lands from a discrimination lawsuit filed by five former employees, a federal judge said, arguing that the for-profit corporation is formed under the laws of the state, not those of the tribal community.

  • May 13, 2024

    Tesla Resolves Ex-Worker's Sex Harassment Suit

    Tesla reached a deal with a former production associate to end her lawsuit accusing the company of firing her after she reported that she had been sexually harassed at work, according to a filing Monday in California federal court.

  • May 13, 2024

    Ex-Uber Software Engineer's Bias Suit Kicked To Arbitration

    An Indian former Uber software engineer must arbitrate her suit claiming she was unlawfully disparaged, micromanaged and humiliated by higher-ups including the company's co-founder, after a New York federal judge found her employment agreement requires an arbitrator to decide whether an arbitration provision is enforceable.

  • May 13, 2024

    Medical Pot Patient Drops Discrimination Suit Against US Steel

    A former U.S. Steel Corp. employee who says he was wrongly fired for using medically licensed marijuana off the job has quietly dropped his race and disability discrimination suit against the company, according to a filing in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • May 13, 2024

    Calif. Jury Awards Ex-UCLA Doctor $14M In 2nd Bias Trial

    A California state jury awarded $14 million to a former UCLA oncologist and professor who said she was discriminated against and constructively discharged from her job due to her gender, four years after the state appeals court threw out a $13 million jury verdict from the first trial.

  • May 13, 2024

    11th Circ. Says Ga. County's Trans Health Ban Violates Title VII

    A split Eleventh Circuit panel upheld a win Monday for a transgender sheriff's deputy who challenged a Georgia county health plan's refusal to pay for gender-affirmation surgery, ruling the coverage exclusion violated federal anti-discrimination law.

  • May 13, 2024

    Gay Teacher's Loss Has Silver Lining For LGBTQ Workers

    Although the Fourth Circuit ruled that a Catholic school was legally allowed to fire a teacher because he's gay, the court took a narrow approach that cut off the school's push to give religious employers more power to sidestep anti-bias law.

  • May 13, 2024

    1st Circ. Backs Arbitration In PwC Pregnancy Bias Suit

    The First Circuit said a PricewaterhouseCoopers LLP accountant must arbitrate her suit claiming she received negative evaluations because she requested maternity leave during a high-risk pregnancy, unpersuaded by her claim that she never received an email adding an arbitration agreement to her employment contract.

  • May 13, 2024

    Security Co. Settles EEOC Age, Disability Bias Suit

    A New York City security company will pay $22,500 to close a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit claiming it pressured a worker to retire following a heart attack and fired him when he refused, according to a Monday filing in New York federal court.

Expert Analysis

  • 4th Circ. Ruling Outlines Defense Against Retaliation Claims

    Author Photo

    The Fourth Circuit's surprising decision in Johnson v. Global Language Center eschewed the low standard typically applied to demonstrating protected activities under Title VII and could affect internal complaint processes and the retaliation defenses available to employers, say Tory Summey and Zack Anstett at Parker Poe.

  • An Overview Of OFCCP's Religious-Exemption Reset

    Author Photo

    The recent rescission of a Trump-era rule that gave government contractors broader latitude under federal anti-discrimination rules doesn't prohibit employment decisions based on religious faith, but clarifies the factors a company must consider when seeking a religious exemption, say Zev Grumet-Morris and Christopher Durham at Duane Morris.

  • FMLA Confusion Persists Despite New DOL Advisory

    Author Photo

    A recent U.S. Department of Labor advisory opinion provides some clarity regarding the Family and Medical Leave Act's handling of holiday weeks, but the FMLA remains a legal minefield that demands fact-specific analysis of each employee's unique situation, says Nicholas Schneider at Eckert Seamans.

  • 2 Steps To Improve Arbitrator Diversity In Employment Cases

    Author Photo

    There are prevalent obstacles in improving diversity among arbitrator ranks, but in the realm of employment-related disputes, there are two action items practitioners should consider to close the race and gender gap, say Todd Lyon and Carola Murguia at Fisher Phillips.

  • Attendance Policies, ADA May Be In EEOC's Crosshairs

    Author Photo

    While a recent matter before the Eleventh Circuit primarily involved the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s subpoena power, the case's factual details suggest that the agency wants to determine whether certain attendance policies violate the Americans with Disabilities Act, potentially on a nationwide scale, say Anne Yuengert and William Manuel at Bradley Arant.

  • High Court Ruling Wouldn't Change Federal Affirmative Action

    Author Photo

    If the U.S. Supreme Court's eventual decision in two cases concerning affirmative action indicates that using race or ethnicity as a factor in college admissions is illegal, it would align with how the Office of Federal Contract Compliance Programs already enforces nondiscrimination regulations for government contractor hiring, say Joanna Colosimo and Evan Szarenski at DCI Consulting.

  • Title IX Damages Outlook 1 Year After High Court Ruling

    Author Photo

    Federal courts have been extending the holding of last year's U.S. Supreme Court decision, Cummings v. Premier Rehab Keller, to disallow emotional distress damages under Title IX, but students and educators suing educational institutions for gender discrimination can still recover monetary damages under alternate theories, say attorneys at Sanford Heisler.

  • State Laws Could Complicate Employer Pandemic Protocols

    Author Photo

    If the recent wave of state bills that would prevent employers from implementing certain safety protocols in a future pandemic is signed into law, companies — especially those that operate across state lines — will be forced to completely rewrite their pandemic playbooks to avoid compliance issues and discrimination claims, says Karla Grossenbacher at Seyfarth Shaw.

  • Remote Work Considerations In A Post-Pandemic World

    Author Photo

    Now that the public health emergency has ended, employers may reevaluate their obligations to allow remote work, as well as the extent to which they must compensate remote working expenses, though it's important to examine any requests under the Americans With Disabilities Act, say Dan Kaplan and Jacqueline Hayduk at Foley & Lardner.

  • An Employer's Overview Of AI Legislation In 5 Jurisdictions

    Author Photo

    Many employers are likely aware of the July 5 enforcement date for New York City's artificial intelligence law, but there are also proposals in Massachusetts, New York, New Jersey, Vermont and Washington, D.C., and a comparison illustrates the emerging legislative trends for AI employment decision tools, say attorneys at Gibson Dunn.

  • Handbook Hot Topics: Remote Work Policies

    Author Photo

    Implementing a remote work policy that clearly articulates eligibility, conduct and performance expectations for remote employees can ease employers’ concerns about workers they may not see on a daily basis, says Melissa Spence at Butler Snow.

  • No Blank Space In Case Law On Handling FMLA Abuse

    Author Photo

    Daniel Schwartz at Shipman & Goodwin discusses real-world case law that guides employers on how to handle suspected Family and Medical Leave Act abuse, specifically in instances where employees attended or performed in a concert while on leave — with Taylor Swift’s ongoing Eras Tour as a hypothetical backdrop.

  • 'Miss Manners' Scenario Holds Lessons On Pregnancy Bias

    Author Photo

    A recent Washington Post "Miss Manners" column, in which a pregnant employee expressed concern about her boss's admonitions against having children, provides an opportunity to evaluate what exactly constitutes pregnancy discrimination, says Robin Shea at Constangy.