Discrimination

  • May 01, 2024

    7th Circ. Backs Dismissal Of Ill. City Worker's Equal Pay Suit

    The Seventh Circuit declined to give an Illinois city diversity officer a second chance at her sex bias suit that claimed she was terminated after complaining that male co-workers were paid more for lighter workloads, ruling she didn't adequately back up her allegations.

  • May 01, 2024

    Tesla Forces Bias Suit Over Firing Into Arbitration

    A California federal judge has thrown out a lawsuit from a former Tesla manager alleging he was fired because he was nearing 60 years old and took medical leave to treat his diabetes, saying an arbitration agreement he signed should be enforced.

  • April 30, 2024

    Ex-Olympus Exec Says He Was Fired For Flagging FDA Issue

    The former global head of product development at medical manufacturer Olympus Corp. said he was fired earlier this year after he reported multiple compliance concerns regarding the company's practices and related to nearly 100 products, according to a suit filed Monday in Pennsylvania federal court.

  • April 30, 2024

    Reed Smith Beats Ex-Paralegal's Sprawling Bias Suit

    A former Reed Smith LLP paralegal hasn't shown that the firm's flagging of her work performance issues and her eventual termination stemmed from age and race discrimination, a New Jersey federal judge ruled Tuesday, handing the law firm a final win in the nearly 9-year-old litigation.

  • April 30, 2024

    Chairman Ousted After Sex Scandal Looks To Prod Arbitration

    The ousted chairman of software investment company The Resource Group International Ltd. is urging a New York court to order his former company to submit to his arbitration claim, in which he accuses its top brass of improperly profiting after he resigned following a sexual harassment scandal.

  • April 30, 2024

    Detroit Tigers Say Fired Workers Can't Testify At Age Bias Trial

    The Detroit Tigers has told a federal court that a former employee who alleged the club made a habit of letting older workers go to promote younger ones shouldn't be allowed to have eight other departed or demoted staff members testify in an upcoming trial.

  • April 30, 2024

    4 Argument Sessions Bias Attys Should Watch In May

    This month, the Second Circuit will review a bias case over paternity leave, the Eighth Circuit will tackle back-to-back legal battles over allegedly false testimony and the bounds of a federal law curbing mandatory arbitration and the Seventh Circuit will consider whether an unconscious bias training was unlawful. Here's a look at four oral argument sessions in May that employment discrimination attorneys may want to add to their calendars. 

  • April 30, 2024

    UAW, Fiat Chrysler Settle Anti-Gay Discrimination Suit

    Fiat Chrysler and a United Auto Workers local have agreed to resolve a former worker's lawsuit alleging she was fired for complaining about anti-gay harassment she faced and her union didn't adequately pursue her grievance, according to a filing in Michigan federal court.

  • April 30, 2024

    Higher Ed Co. Shuts Down Retaliation Suit At 5th Circ.

    The Fifth Circuit refused Tuesday to reinstate a lawsuit from two Black workers who said a higher education services company fired them for complaining about race bias, saying they hadn't overcome the company's argument that combative behavior and missed work goals were the reasons they lost their jobs.

  • April 30, 2024

    Wash. Job Applicant's Pay Transparency Suit Tossed For Now

    A Washington federal judge tossed a job applicant's state pay transparency suit against a rent-to-own retailer, ruling the job-seeker didn't prove how the company's failure to include pay information in a job listing negatively affected him.

  • April 30, 2024

    Welch's Says Worker Should Stay Fired In Dispute With Union

    Welch Foods Inc. on Tuesday said a Pennsylvania magistrate judge is wrong to say the company should be forced to rehire a Teamsters-represented worker it fired for making vulgar comments to a female co-worker, saying the words the ex-employee used should be construed as sexual harassment.

  • April 30, 2024

    Georgia EMS Co. Rife With Harassment And Abuse, Suit Says

    An Atlanta-based EMS provider was hit with a lawsuit by a former paramedic who says in under one year with the company, she faced a workplace rife with sexual harassment, domestic abuse, medical malpractice, retaliation and white supremacist affiliations.

  • April 30, 2024

    Restaurant Inks $60K Deal To Close EEOC Gay Bias Suit

    A Memphis, Tennessee, restaurant will pay up $60,000 to settle a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging it failed to step in when a gay employee said he was harassed with homophobic comments and then fired him for complaining about the mistreatment.

  • April 30, 2024

    Atty Sanctioned Over Missed Depo During Solar Eclipse Trip

    A Florida lawyer whose client missed his own deposition while the attorney was solar eclipse viewing has been ordered to pay related attorney fees incurred by AAA as the business fights a gender discrimination lawsuit.

  • April 30, 2024

    EEOC Says High Court Ruling Supports Ex-Worker's ADA Suit

    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission urged the Tenth Circuit to reinstate a worker's disability bias suit claiming she was fired from a Kansas health system for refusing mental health counseling, arguing that a recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling shows her case was improperly tossed.

  • April 30, 2024

    Senior Care Co., EEOC Strike Deal To End Age Bias Suit

    A Georgia senior living community will pay $78,000 to resolve a U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission suit alleging it pressured a receptionist in her 70s to retire and then fired her because she was hospitalized for high blood pressure, according to a federal court filing.

  • April 30, 2024

    School Knocks Out Religious Bias Suit Over Pronoun Policy

    An Indiana federal court Tuesday dismissed a suit from a Christian former teacher who objected to using gender-affirming names for trans students, ruling that letting him refer to students by last names only would be asking too much under a standard articulated by the U.S. Supreme Court in June.

  • April 30, 2024

    Logistics Co. Strikes Deal To Exit EEOC Retaliation Suit

    A logistics company will pay $60,000 to resolve a suit brought by the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission accusing it of forcing a staffing agency to rescind a worker's employment there after he complained that the facility refused to hire Hispanic workers.

  • April 29, 2024

    6th Circ. Reopens Disability Bias Suit Against Kroger

    The Sixth Circuit on Monday reinstated a Kroger employee's lawsuit alleging her supervisor micromanaged her and pushed her out after revealing she had breast cancer, saying a jury could find the retail company refused to allow her to take it easy after she returned from surgery.

  • April 29, 2024

    Diddy Calls 1991 Rape Claim 'False, Offensive And Salacious'

    Sean "Diddy" Combs has asked a New York court to trim one of the multiple sexual assault suits he is facing, calling plaintiff Joi Dickerson-Neal's allegations of a 1991 rape "false, offensive and salacious."

  • April 29, 2024

    Trans Patients In NC, W.Va. Prevail In 4th Circ. Health Fight

    The Fourth Circuit on Monday affirmed two lower court decisions ordering North Carolina and West Virginia to end discriminatory exclusions for coverage of gender-affirming medical care for transgender people in both states, finding the lower courts properly struck down the policies as "textbook sex discrimination."

  • April 29, 2024

    6th Circ. Revives Black Truck Driver's Race Bias Suit

    The Sixth Circuit reinstated a Black truck driver's race bias suit claiming he was dealt a steeper punishment than white drivers for allegedly driving recklessly on two occasions, stating he put forward enough detail to cast doubt on his employer's position that he was sacked over safety concerns.

  • April 29, 2024

    GSA Guides Agencies On Responsible Generative AI Buying

    The U.S. General Services Administration on Monday issued guidance to federal agencies for buying generative artificial intelligence services and related hardware, intended to ensure that emerging technology is used "responsibly and effectively."

  • April 29, 2024

    Ex-Manager Accuses Hallmark Of Retaliation For Wage Claims

    A former manager said he was illegally let go for speaking up about Hallmark's alleged violations of a minimum wage ordinance, telling a California state court Monday that the greeting card giant terminated him for supposedly saying an expletive when profanity use is "embedded in Hallmark's culture."

  • April 29, 2024

    9th Circ. Backs Raytheon Defeat Of Religious Vaccination Suit

    The Ninth Circuit refused to revive a lawsuit alleging Raytheon Technologies Corp. unlawfully harassed and forced out employees who received religious exemptions from its COVID-19 vaccination policy, finding Monday that companywide reminders about inoculation and other preventative measures weren't based on religion.

Expert Analysis

  • Eye On Compliance: A Shift In Religious Accommodation Law

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    The recent U.S. Supreme Court ruling in Groff v. DeJoy is making it more difficult for employers to deny religious accommodations, and there are three takeaways employers should keep in mind, say William Cook and Matthew High at Wilson Elser.

  • Tick Tock: When Punctuality Raises Employee ADA Questions

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    A recent viral TikTok video — where a user claims they were disrespected by a potential employer when inquiring about accommodations for difficulty with being on time — shows that even in the most seemingly questionable situations, there may be legitimate issues that require Americans with Disabilities Act considerations, says Daniel Pasternak at Squire Patton.

  • Tips For Making And Maintaining Employee Resource Groups

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    Employers should consider creating employee resource groups to create a workplace that can flourish in the new remote work reality, and keep in mind three best practices to avoid potential legal pitfalls and challenges that come with them, say Tyler Paetkau and Catarina Colón at Husch Blackwell.

  • Employer Pointers From Tiger Woods' Legal Dispute With Ex

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    Ex-girlfriend Erica Herman's sexual harassment suit against Tiger Woods, which was recently sent to arbitration, highlights the need for employers to understand their rights and responsibilities around workplace relationships, nondisclosure agreements and arbitration provisions, say Stephanie Reynolds and Sean McKaveney at Fisher Phillips.

  • Equinox Bias Verdict Shows Swift Employer Response Is Key

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    A nearly $11.3 million jury verdict against Equinox in New York federal court shows just how high the stakes are for employers dealing with harassment and discrimination in the workplace, and how important consistent investigation and discipline are when responding to individual internal complaints, says Jennifer Huelskamp at Porter Wright.

  • A Midyear Review Of EEOC's Gender-Related Priorities

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    The U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s 2023-2027 strategic enforcement plan focuses on various gender-related issues such as the enactment of pregnancy discrimination and pay transparency laws, and now, more than halfway through the fiscal year, the EEOC's enforcement of such laws is set to surpass previous years, say attorneys at Proskauer.

  • Employer Drug-Testing Policies Must Evolve With State Law

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    As multistate employers face ongoing challenges in drafting consistent marijuana testing policies due to the evolving patchwork of state laws, they should note some emerging patterns among local and state statutes to ensure compliance in different jurisdictions, say attorneys at Troutman Pepper.

  • Insurance Implications Of High Court Affirmative Action Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies at Harvard University and the University of North Carolina will likely result in more litigation related to hiring practices, with implications for insurance coverage, meaning policyholders must remain wary of exclusions and other potential roadblocks, say attorneys at Pillsbury.

  • 4 Strategies To Counter Antisemitism In The Workplace

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    With antisemitism on the rise in the U.S., employers have a duty to help Jewish employees feel safe and supported in their professional lives by adapting the four points of the Biden administration's National Strategy to Counter Antisemitism for the workplace, say Johanna Zelman and Rachel Ullrich at FordHarrison.

  • Employer Steps To Protect DEI Plans Post-Affirmative Action

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s decision to end affirmative action in higher education may embolden opponents of diversity, equity and inclusion efforts in the employment context, but employers can take steps to mitigate litigation risks while still advancing their internal policy goals, say Greg Demers and Renai Rodney at Ropes & Gray.

  • Unpacking The POWR Act, Colo.'s New Work Harassment Law

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    With the August rollout of Colorado’s Protecting Opportunities and Workers' Rights Act set to make it easier for employees to claim harassment, companies should confirm that their harassment prevention programs satisfy the law’s requirements and provide a clear method to investigate any future claims, say Mamie Ling and Michael Freimann at Armstrong Teasdale.

  • Complying With AI Guidance In Employment Decisions

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    Following the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission’s recently updated guidance on the use of artificial intelligence for employment-related decisions, employers need to adapt in kind to ensure they are using technology in a responsible, compliant and nondiscriminatory manner, say Luke Bickel and Yasamin Parsafar at Sheppard Mullin.

  • NY, Minn. Set Pace For Employee Breastfeeding Protections

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    Breastfeeding employees have gotten increased legal protections through recently effective amendments in New York and Minnesota, and the laws underline the need for employers to watch for state-level legislative efforts to extend these protections beyond federal requirements, say John Litchfield and Miranda Curtis at Foley & Lardner.