Corporate

  • May 23, 2024

    'New' Facts Don't Permit Do-Over, Kraft-Heinz Tells Chancery

    An institutional shareholder of The Kraft-Heinz Co. is not entitled to a "do-over" on an insider trading lawsuit that Delaware's Court of Chancery dismissed in 2021 because the supposed "new evidence" it offers isn't actually new and wouldn't have made any difference in the case, the company said Thursday.

  • May 23, 2024

    Resignation Letter Bylaws Targeted In Five Del. Class Actions

    General Motors Co. is among the latest targets of new bylaw-focused litigation from Abbott Cooper PLLC and Block & Leviton LLP, one of five companies in a series of lawsuits in Delaware's Chancery Court that seek to invalidate an "irrevocable resignation requirement" in company bylaws.

  • May 23, 2024

    Apple Investor Again Seeks Green Light For $490M Settlement

    An Apple Inc. investor has asked a California federal judge to revisit a $490 million settlement deal that would end claims the tech giant misled investors about iPhone sales in China, telling the court that it had addressed the judge's critique that parts of the relevant filings were "convoluted."

  • May 23, 2024

    Ex-Fund Manager Settles SEC's $264M Offering Fraud Claims

    A former private fund manager has agreed to pay $250,000 to resolve U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission claims he violated securities fraud laws by making promises that funds he handled would invest almost $264 million that they did not actually have on hand in issuers, including two special purpose acquisition vehicles.

  • May 23, 2024

    NC Fintech Atty Sues Paymentus For Gender, Age Bias

    A former senior corporate counsel for cloud-based billing company Paymentus Corp. has slapped her former employer with a $100,000 age and gender discrimination suit in North Carolina federal court, saying she was paid less than her male colleagues and eventually fired for complaining, only to be replaced by a much younger male attorney.

  • May 23, 2024

    Archegos Witness Admits Lying To Exec Charged In Collapse

    An Archegos manager who pled guilty to fraud and is cooperating with prosecutors conceded to a Manhattan federal jury Thursday that he fostered an effort to mock his former boss and hide information before the hedge fund's $36 billion collapse.

  • May 23, 2024

    4th Circ. Rules No Coverage For Mars' COVID Losses

    Candymaker Mars Inc. can't get coverage from Factory Mutual Insurance Co. for its COVID-19-related losses, the Fourth Circuit ruled Thursday, further rejecting Mars' bid to certify a question to the Virginia Supreme Court.

  • May 23, 2024

    Pipe Supplier Can't Nix $2.6M 'Take Home' Asbestos Verdict

    A California appeals panel won't upend a $2.6 million verdict against J-M Manufacturing Co. Inc. in a case alleging a man contracted mesothelioma because of his brother's work, rejecting the company's argument that the court should apply a duty standard for negligence claims to the man's strict liability claim.

  • May 23, 2024

    NY Top Court Revives FanDuel Investors Suit

    New York's top appeals court on Thursday revived a suit brought by FanDuel investors who claim they were deprived of profits from a merger, disagreeing with a lower court's interpretation of Scottish law.

  • May 23, 2024

    Biden Renominates NLRB Chair, Taps Republican For Vacancy

    President Joe Biden on Thursday announced he intends to renominate Lauren McFerran to continue serving as chair of the National Labor Relations Board, while also tapping a Seyfarth Shaw LLP partner to fill a long-vacant Republican seat on the board.

  • May 23, 2024

    Split Ohio High Court Says Jury Must Mull Drilling Rights Row

    A split Ohio Supreme Court unraveled a trial court ruling in favor of oil and gas rights owner Tera LLC that acted as the basis of a $40 million damages award against Gulfport Energy, reasoning Thursday that there is a "genuine issue of material fact" over the meaning of certain terms in parties' lease agreement.

  • May 23, 2024

    Legal Marketer, Ark. Firm Agree To End Trade Secrets Suit

    A legal marketing business has agreed to dismiss a Georgia federal lawsuit accusing an Arkansas law firm and others of stealing and profiting off its trade secrets, including a database of client leads for mass torts over talcum powder and heartburn medication.

  • May 23, 2024

    Amazon Workers' $5.5M COVID Screening Deal Gets Initial OK

    A California federal magistrate judge on Wednesday gave her preliminary blessing to a $5.5 million settlement Amazon agreed to pay to a class of 250,000 employees who accused the digital retail behemoth of failing to pay for time spent undergoing mandatory COVID-19 screenings before their shifts.

  • May 23, 2024

    Just 57% Of Complex Global Deals Closed Since 2020

    About 43% of complex cross-border global deals have failed to close since the start of 2020, while the remaining 57% did close but were highly likely to involve remedies, according to a new report from Weil Gotshal & Manges LLP.

  • May 23, 2024

    J&J Loses Expedited Bid For Beasley Allen Docs In Talc MDL

    Johnson & Johnson has lost its bid in New Jersey federal court to have the Beasley Allen Law Firm quickly produce documents related to what J&J said seems to be an "intentional effort" by the firm to "bias the vote" against a proposed $6.5 billion reorganization plan for its talc subsidiary.

  • May 23, 2024

    Stryker Unit And Seyfarth Attys Hit With $275K Sanctions

    A Colorado federal judge has imposed $275,000 in sanctions jointly and severally on Stryker-owned Howmedica Osteonics Corp., along with Seyfarth Shaw LLP, for witness coaching and discovery violations in a bitter breach-of-contract dispute, amounting to roughly one-eighth of what plaintiff ORP Surgical LLC had sought.

  • May 23, 2024

    5th Circ. Won't Fast-Track Challenge To DOL's OT Rule

    The Fifth Circuit won't speed up a Dairy Queen franchisee's challenge to the U.S. Department of Labor's decision to increase the salary threshold for a Fair Labor Standards Act overtime exemption, turning down the entity and its owner's bid to expedite the appeal.

  • May 23, 2024

    Ambulance Co. Owner Accused Of $1M Pandemic Loan Fraud

    The owner of a California ambulance company who was charged last year with tax evasion and filing false returns has been further accused of fraudulently securing $1 million from federal pandemic relief loan programs, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • May 23, 2024

    GSK, Boehringer Prevail In 1st Zantac Cancer Trial

    A Chicago jury found Thursday that Zantac heartburn medication and its generic counterparts sold by GlaxoSmithKline and Boehringer Ingelheim are not responsible for an Illinois woman's colon cancer and her subsequent, debilitating symptoms, handing the drug companies a decisive victory in the first of hundreds of such cases to go to trial.

  • May 23, 2024

    EU Flags Nations For Shortcomings On Pillar 2, Exchange Law

    The European Commission said Thursday that six European Union countries still have failed to implement the global minimum tax for large companies, and it noted that an additional three aren't properly implementing an information exchange law.

  • May 23, 2024

    Fisher Phillips Reinforces Calif. Labor And Employment Team

    Fisher Phillips has hired two of counsel in its Irvine, California, office to continue representing employers and helping those clients navigate a range of labor and employment matters.

  • May 23, 2024

    Norfolk Southern Inks $310M Deal To Settle Feds' Spill Suit

    Norfolk Southern Railway Co. on Thursday agreed to a $310 million deal to settle the federal government's legal claims that arose out of the 2023 train derailment in East Palestine, Ohio, that released large amounts of contaminants into the air, ground and water.

  • May 23, 2024

    DOJ Sues Live Nation 14 Years After Ticketmaster Deal

    The U.S. Department of Justice sued Live Nation Thursday over the 2010 agreement clearing the concert promotion giant's purchase of Ticketmaster, an oft-maligned deal that enforcers now want to unwind and that is blamed for fiascoes like the meltdown of ticket sales for Taylor Swift's Eras tour.

  • May 22, 2024

    American Air Pilots Win Cert. Over 401(k)'s ESG Investments

    A Texas federal judge on Wednesday certified a class of pilots accusing American Airlines of packing its $26 billion retirement plan with investments that focused too heavily on environmental, social and governance factors, like climate change, and too little on financial returns.

  • May 22, 2024

    Stubhub, Attys Beat Sanctions Bid For Lost Hyperlinked Docs

    A California federal magistrate judge on Monday rejected a request for sanctions against StubHub and its counsel over problems finding hyperlinked documents in a case brought by consumers seeking refunds for events that were canceled or rescheduled due to COVID-19, saying the court's order requiring their production was "in most cases impossible to comply with."

Expert Analysis

  • Tips For Keeping Trade Secrets In The Vault

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    Key practices aimed at maintaining confidentiality can help companies establish trade secret status as the Federal Trade Commission's ban on noncompetes makes it prudent to explore other security measures, says John Baranello at Moses & Singer.

  • 5 Lessons From Ex-Vitol Trader's FCPA Conviction

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    The recent Foreign Corrupt Practices Act and money laundering conviction of former Vitol oil trader Javier Aguilar in a New York federal court provides defense takeaways on issues ranging from the definition of “domestic concern” to jury instruction strategy, says attorney Andrew Feldman.

  • SEC Amendments May Launch New Execution Disclosure Era

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    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's recently adopted amendments to Rule 605 of Regulation NMS for executions on covered orders in national market system stocks modernize and enhance execution quality reporting, but serious guidance is still needed to make the reports useful for the public investor, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Questions Remain After Mass. Adverse Possession Case

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    A recent Massachusetts Land Court decision, concerning an adverse possession claim on a family company-owned property, leaves open questions about potential applicability to closely held corporations and other ownership types going forward, says Brad Hickey at DarrowEverett.

  • Mitigating Incarceration's Impacts On Foreign Nationals

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    Sentencing arguments that highlighted the disparate impact incarceration would have on a British national recently sentenced for insider training by a New York district court, when compared to similarly situated U.S. citizens, provide an example of the advocacy needed to avoid or mitigate problems unique to noncitizen defendants, say attorneys at Lankler Siffert.

  • Navigating Title VII Compliance And Litigation Post-Muldrow

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Muldrow v. St. Louis has broadened the scope of Title VII litigation, meaning employers must reassess their practices to ensure compliance across jurisdictions and conduct more detailed factual analyses to defend against claims effectively, say Robert Pepple and Christopher Stevens at Nixon Peabody.

  • Tiny Tweaks To Bank Merger Forms May Have Big Impact

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    The impact of proposed changes to the Federal Reserve Board's and Federal Deposit Insurance Corp.'s bank merger review forms would be significant, resulting in hundreds of additional burden hours for bank merger applicants and signaling a further shift by the prudential bank regulators toward more rigorous scrutiny of mergers, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • How CFPB Credit Card Rules Slot Into Broader Considerations

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    Swirling legal challenges against the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau's recent rulemaking concerning credit card late fees raise questions about how regulated entities should respond to the bureau's rules — and how quickly they should act, say Caitlin Mandel and Elizabeth Ireland at Winston & Strawn.

  • 3 Employer Lessons From NLRB's Complaint Against SpaceX

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    Severance agreements traditionally have included nondisparagement and nondisclosure provisions as a matter of course — but a recent National Labor Relations Board complaint against SpaceX underscores the ongoing efforts to narrow severance agreements at the state and federal levels, say attorneys at Williams & Connolly.

  • Lessons On Challenging Class Plaintiffs' Expert Testimony

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    In class actions seeking damages, plaintiffs are increasingly using expert opinions to establish predominance, but several recent rulings from California federal courts shed light on how defendants can respond, say Jennifer Romano and Raija Horstman at Crowell & Moring.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Businesses Should Take Their AI Contracts Off Auto-Renew

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    When subscribing to artificial intelligence tools — or to any technology in a highly competitive and legally thorny market — companies should push back on automatic renewal contract clauses for reasons including litigation and regulatory risk, and competition, says Chris Wlach at Huge Inc.

  • Del. Dispatch: Chancery's Evolving Approach To Caremark

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    Though Caremark claims are historically the least likely corporate claims to lead to liability, such cases have been met in recent years with increased judicial receptivity — but the Delaware Court of Chancery still expressly discourages the reflexive filing of Caremark claims following corporate mishaps, say attorneys at Fried Frank.

  • Why Employers Shouldn't Overreact To Protest Activities

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    Recent decisions from the First Circuit in Kinzer v. Whole Foods and the National Labor Relations Board in Home Depot hold eye-opening takeaways about which employee conduct is protected as "protest activity" and make a case for fighting knee-jerk reactions that could result in costly legal proceedings, says Frank Shuster at Constangy.

  • What The Justices' Copyright Damages Ruling Didn't Address

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    While the U.S. Supreme Court’s recent ruling in Warner Chappell v. Nealy clarified when a copyright owner may recover damages in jurisdictions that apply the so-called discovery rule, it did not settle the overriding question of whether the Copyright Act even permits applying the rule, say Ivy Estoesta and William Milliken at Sterne Kessler.

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