Connecticut

  • May 28, 2024

    High Court Passes On Collection Firm's CFPB Funding Fight

    The U.S. Supreme Court said Tuesday that it won't take up a now-shuttered debt collection law firm's fight against an investigative demand by the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, turning down a case that covered the same constitutional ground as one that the justices recently decided in the agency's favor.

  • May 28, 2024

    Guinness Brewer Beats Appeal In Whiskey Bottle TM Dispute

    The Second Circuit on Tuesday upheld a post-trial order requiring a spirits maker to redesign its bottles after a jury found they dilute Guinness beer maker Diageo's trademark rights for its own whiskey brand.

  • May 28, 2024

    Conn. Judge Asks If 'Sham' Exception Saves Stadium Fight

    A Connecticut appellate judge asked Tuesday if a "sham" exception to limits on government contracting lawsuits can restore claims that the city of Hartford ran a fake bidding process for the redevelopment of Dillon Stadium, but counsel for several defendants pushed back and said it would not apply to the facts of the case.

  • May 28, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Avenatti Appeal Of Nike Conviction

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear an appeal from Michael Avenatti challenging his conviction for trying to extort millions from Nike, with the high court's rejection ending the disbarred attorney's chances at overturning one of his three criminal convictions.

  • May 28, 2024

    Deutsche Bank Wins Conn. Appeal In Battle With Billionaire

    Deutsche Bank AG can continue to fight one prong of its sprawling, decade-long legal battle against billionaire Alexander Vik and his daughter as it seeks to satisfy a $243 million judgment rendered in the United Kingdom, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

  • May 24, 2024

    Live Nation Ticket Buyers Follow Feds With Antitrust Suit

    Live Nation and Ticketmaster were hit with a consumer antitrust proposed class action Thursday accusing them of monopolizing concert promotion and ticketing for major concert venues following their 2010 merger, which comes on the heels of the U.S. Department of Justice's own lawsuit.

  • May 24, 2024

    Real Estate Authority: Adaptive Reuse, Climate Risk, SFR

    Catch up on this week's key developments by state from Law360 Real Estate Authority — including one BigLaw real estate leader's take on adaptive reuse, the enduring risk of climate change for public companies, and the latest industry player perspectives on the single-family rental market.

  • May 24, 2024

    Conn., Property Owners Say Town Is Wrong On Housing Law

    Connecticut's Department of Housing and several property owners in New Canaan are taking issue with the town's arguments in a bid to pause its lawsuit challenging the state's denial of affordable housing credits, saying the town is misinterpreting a recently passed bill.

  • May 24, 2024

    Red States Target Blue States In Push To End Climate Torts

    A novel red-state request that the U.S. Supreme Court nix climate change torts brought by state governments against fossil fuel companies can be seen as an attempt to urge the justices not to pass up another opportunity to weigh in on the issue, legal experts told Law360.

  • May 24, 2024

    Cannabis Company Fights Sanctions Bid In $10M Contract Suit

    A cannabis company has opposed a sanctions request in a dispute surrounding its merger with Connecticut marijuana business Theraplant LLC, saying it met document production deadlines despite an opposing attorney's claim that he couldn't open a link emailed at 11:53 p.m. via a password that followed at 11:59 p.m.

  • May 24, 2024

    Airline Worker Terrorized 'Countless' Passengers, Suit Says

    A California man with ties to American Airlines gained access to the private information of regional airline passengers and embarked on a monthslong campaign of harassing them, according to a lawsuit in federal court with 15 plaintiffs.

  • May 24, 2024

    Biden's Judicial Impact And What's Left On The Wish List

    President Joe Biden secured confirmation of his 200th federal judge Wednesday and has transformed the judiciary by picking more women and people of color than any other president. But the upcoming election season could derail his hopes of confirming many more judges.

  • May 24, 2024

    ERISA Arbitration Backers See Hope In 2nd Circ. Dissent

    A split Second Circuit panel backed workers — and joined three other circuits — when it rejected an attempt to force a proposed class action Employee Retirement Income Security Act lawsuit into individual arbitration, but employers are seizing on a dissent from the recent ruling to try to turn the tide.

  • May 24, 2024

    2nd Circ. Wary Of Deloitte Workers' 401(k) Suit Revival Bid

    The Second Circuit appeared reluctant Friday to revive a proposed class action against Deloitte alleging workers' employee 401(k) plans were weighed down by excessive recordkeeping fees, with multiple judges on a panel pointing to a lack of specific cost comparisons to other plans in an amended complaint.

  • May 24, 2024

    Exiled Chinese Businessman Is No $1B Fraudster, Jury Told

    Exiled Chinese businessman and purported billionaire Guo Wengui ran legitimate companies in support of a broad movement that opposed the Chinese Communist Party, his attorney told a Manhattan federal jury Friday, rather than what prosecutors say was a multifaceted $1 billion fraud.

  • May 24, 2024

    Burn Charity Bookkeeper Did Not Steal Money, Estate Says

    The estate of a Connecticut burn care charity's longtime bookkeeper has denied that she stole more than $655,000 before her death in August 2023, pushing back on claims in a state court lawsuit that seeks nearly $2 million in damages.

  • May 24, 2024

    Stew Leonard's Sued Over Dancer's Peanut Allergy Death

    The family of a U.K.-born dancer is suing the Stew Leonard's grocery store chain, alleging its failure to update labels of cookies that contained peanuts led to her death at age 25 from an allergic reaction.

  • May 24, 2024

    DOJ's Live Nation-Ticketmaster Suit: What You Should Know

    The U.S. Department of Justice and a slew of state attorneys general filed a suit challenging the 2010 merger of Ticketmaster and Live Nation. Here, catch up on Law360's coverage of the deal and those who have challenged it along the way – Taylor Swift fans, investors and regulators.

  • May 23, 2024

    Latham, Cravath Rep Live Nation In DOJ Ticketmaster Battle

    In the battle against the U.S. Department of Justice's push to break up Live Nation and Ticketmaster, the concert promotion and ticketing company has called upon a team of attorneys at Cravath Swaine & Moore and Latham & Watkins to go up against a large roster of highly experienced government antitrust attorneys.

  • May 23, 2024

    FCC Defends Nielsen Data In Low-Power TV Licensing Suit

    The Federal Communications Commission is defending its use of Nielsen statistics to determine if a low-power TV station should receive protections provided under a 2022 law aimed at safeguarding local and rural broadcasting.

  • May 23, 2024

    Conn. Marketing Co., Competitor Settle Exec Poaching Suit

    The Connecticut-based healthcare marketing firm Primacy LLC has reached a settlement with a competitor it accused of poaching a top executive, weeks after bringing a trade secrets lawsuit in federal court.

  • May 23, 2024

    TRO Against Ex-TD Bank Employees Revised

    A federal judge in Connecticut walked back part of a temporary restraining order against ex-TD Bank employees accused of siphoning $25 million in business to Raymond James Financial, saying the previous order may have been more restrictive than necessary.

  • May 23, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Insurer's $2.5M Suit Over Valuation Software

    The Second Circuit on Thursday revived an insurer's indemnification bid against software company Audatex for $2.5 million in costs from a suit alleging its use of Audatex's valuation software resulted in underpayment for totaled cars, concluding the lower court erred in finding the suit didn't result from the insurer's use of Audatex's software.

  • May 23, 2024

    Resignation Letter Bylaws Targeted In Five Del. Class Actions

    General Motors Co. is among the latest targets of new bylaw-focused litigation from Abbott Cooper PLLC and Block & Leviton LLP, one of five companies in a series of lawsuits in Delaware's Chancery Court that seek to invalidate an "irrevocable resignation requirement" in company bylaws.

  • May 23, 2024

    22 States Seek To Defend EPA Heavy-Duty Truck GHG Rule

    A coalition of 22 Democrat-led states and four cities moved to intervene on Thursday in defense of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's final rule establishing greenhouse gas emission standards for heavy-duty vehicles, arguing that vacating the rule would lead to direct injuries to state lands and resources.

Expert Analysis

  • How Attys Can Avoid Pitfalls When Withdrawing From A Case

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    The Trump campaign's recent scuffle over its bid to replace its counsel in a pregnancy retaliation suit offers a chance to remind attorneys that many troubles inherent in withdrawing from a case can be mitigated or entirely avoided by communicating with clients openly and frequently, says Christopher Konneker at Orsinger Nelson.

  • Using A Children's Book Approach In Firm Marketing Content

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    From “The Giving Tree” to “Where the Wild Things Are,” most children’s books are easy to remember because they use simple words and numbers to tell stories with a human impact — a formula law firms should emulate in their marketing content to stay front of mind for potential clients, says Seema Desai Maglio at The Found Word.

  • The State Of Play In DEI And ESG 1 Year After Harvard Ruling

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    Almost a year after the U.S. Supreme Court decided Students for Fair Admissions v. Harvard, attorney general scrutiny of environmental, social and governance-related efforts indicates a potential path for corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives to be targeted, say attorneys at Crowell & Moring.

  • 2nd Circ. Ruling Affirms NY Law's Creditor-Friendly Approach

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    The Second Circuit’s recent ruling in 245 Park Member v. HNA International provides creditors with some reason for optimism that debtors in New York may face rejection in court for aiming to keep creditors at arm’s length by transferring personal assets into an LLC, says Jeff Newton at Omni Bridgeway.

  • What The FTC Report On AG Collabs Means For Cos.

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    The Federal Trade Commission's April report on working with state attorneys general shows collaboration can increase efficiency and consistency in how statutes are interpreted and enforced, which can minimize the likelihood of requests for inconsistent injunctive relief that can create operational problems for businesses, say attorneys at Kelley Drye.

  • When Oral Settlements Reached In Mediation Are Enforceable

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    A recent decision by the New Jersey Appellate Division illustrates the difficulties that may arise in trying to enforce an oral settlement agreement reached in mediation, but adherence to certain practices can improve the likelihood that such an agreement will be binding, says Richard Mason at MasonADR.

  • Series

    Being An EMT Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    While some of my experiences as an emergency medical technician have been unusually painful and searing, the skills I’ve learned — such as triage, empathy and preparedness — are just as useful in my work as a restructuring lawyer, says Marshall Huebner at Davis Polk.

  • In Debate Over High Court Wording, 'Wetland' Remains Murky

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    Though the U.S. Supreme Court's decision limiting the Clean Water Act’s wetlands jurisdiction is now a year old, Sackett v. EPA's practical consequences for property owners are still evolving as federal agencies and private parties advance competing interpretations of the court's language and methods for distinguishing wetlands in lower courts, says Neal McAliley at Carlton Fields.

  • Exploring An Alternative Model Of Litigation Finance

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    A new model of litigation finance, most aptly described as insurance-backed litigation funding, differs from traditional funding in two key ways, and the process of securing it involves three primary steps, say Bob Koneck, Christopher Le Neve Foster and Richard Butters at Atlantic Global Risk LLC.

  • Airlines Must Prepare For State AG Investigations

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    A recent agreement between the U.S. Department of Transportation and 18 states and territories will allow attorneys general to investigate consumer complaints against commercial passenger airlines — so carriers must be ready for heightened scrutiny and possibly inconsistent enforcement, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • Series

    Teaching Yoga Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Being a yoga instructor has helped me develop my confidence and authenticity, as well as stress management and people skills — all of which have crossed over into my career as an attorney, says Laura Gongaware at Clyde & Co.

  • A Vision For Economic Clerkships In The Legal System

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    As courts handle increasingly complex damages analyses involving vast amounts of data, an economic clerkship program — integrating early-career economists into the judicial system — could improve legal outcomes and provide essential training to clerks, say Mona Birjandi at Data for Decisions and Matt Farber at Secretariat.

  • E-Discovery Quarterly: Recent Rulings On Text Message Data

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    Electronically stored information on cellphones, and in particular text messages, can present unique litigation challenges, and recent court decisions demonstrate that counsel must carefully balance what data should be preserved, collected, reviewed and produced, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

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