Connecticut

  • March 25, 2024

    Subcontractor Sues Tech Co. For $1.8M Over RTX Project

    A subcontractor hired to move data when RTX Corp. sold a training business to Vertex Aerospace says it plummeted into financial turmoil because master contractor Delaware North America LLC underestimated the scope and cost of the project and asked it to shoulder extra responsibilities without additional compensation.

  • March 25, 2024

    SEC Says Justices Should Skip Musk's Gag-Order Grievance

    The U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is asking the U.S. Supreme Court to pass on Elon Musk's complaint that an agency-imposed gag order violates his free speech rights, arguing the Tesla CEO entered the agreement willingly and has presented no legal justification for backing out.

  • March 25, 2024

    InBev's Modelo Loses 2nd Circ. Appeal In Hard Seltzer Fight

    The Second Circuit said Monday that a licensing agreement between Anheuser-Busch InBev SA and Constellation Brands was ambiguous about whether hard seltzers are beer, affirming a New York federal judge's order to let jurors decide the question at a trial where Constellation Brands prevailed against claims of trademark infringement.

  • March 25, 2024

    'Infested Slum' Suit Warrants Class Cert., Conn. Justices Told

    Former tenants of a Hartford apartment complex are urging the Connecticut Supreme Court to let them pursue class claims that the complex turned into a "mold and cockroach infested slum," arguing in a hearing Monday that a lower court focused too heavily on the differences between the conditions of each unit.

  • March 25, 2024

    Cannabis Bill Roundup: NY Targets Illicit Pot Sellers

    New York lawmakers introduced legislation to punish unlicensed cannabis sellers, Hawaii legislators made modifications to a proposal to legalize recreational marijuana, and a Connecticut bill targeting synthetic cannabinoids was referred to a legislative research office. Here are the major moves in cannabis legislation from the past week.

  • March 22, 2024

    Real Estate Co. Says Ch. 7 Trustee Ginned Up Conn. AG Probe

    A company that buys houses from financially distressed individuals and rents the homes back to their former owners filed a scathing adversary proceeding against a Chapter 7 trustee's avoidance action, claiming the trustee ginned up a "baseless" state government probe and is harming several estates she claims to be protecting.

  • March 22, 2024

    Fired CFO Of Conn. Gas Co. Seeks $5.6M From Sale

    The former chief financial officer of Hocon Gas Inc., a propane and heating oil company serving three Northeastern states, says he was fired for dubious reasons after demanding his share of distributions ahead of a planned sale of the company and its affiliates, in a $5.6 million lawsuit in Connecticut state court.

  • March 22, 2024

    Airbnb Sued Over Conn. Woman's Fatal Burns In Jamaica

    Airbnb has taken to Connecticut federal court to defend against claims that it is financially responsible for an explosion at a Jamaican rental property that caused first-degree burns over 56% of a renter's body, eventually leading to the woman's death in the U.S. two months later.

  • March 22, 2024

    Kwok Trustee's RICO Suit Paused Pending NY Criminal Trial

    A Connecticut bankruptcy judge Friday paused two adversary actions in the Chapter 11 bankruptcy of Ho Wan Kwok until the exiled Chinese businessman's criminal trial for fraud and racketeering, slated to start in May, wraps up.

  • March 22, 2024

    Firearms Co. Agrees To Dissolve Amid Conn. 'Ghost Gun' Suit

    One of four firearms companies that the Connecticut attorney general sued in 2023 over the online sale of "ghost gun" parts has stopped operating and agreed to dissolve, according to a stipulated judgment that would release Florida-based Steel Fox Firearms Inc. from the litigation.

  • March 22, 2024

    US Antitrust Enforcers Keep Big Tech Cases Coming

    A backlash against powerful tech companies is reaching a fever pitch in the U.S., as enforcers with the U.S. Department of Justice and the Federal Trade Commission now have pending lawsuits accusing Apple, Amazon, Google and Meta of monopolizing key digital markets.

  • March 22, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Case Against Man Held By ICE Despite Bail

    The Second Circuit said Friday a Brooklyn federal judge overstepped by tossing a case against a Dominican man who was detained by Immigration and Customs Enforcement after being granted bail in an illegal-reentry case, disagreeing with the judge's finding that the government was merely trying to thwart a court order.

  • March 21, 2024

    'Access Hollywood' Tape Key To Trump Verdict, 2nd Circ. Told

    Writer E. Jean Carroll urged the Second Circuit on Wednesday not to undo a $5 million verdict finding that Donald Trump sexually abused and defamed her, saying the jury rightly viewed the former president's infamous "Access Hollywood" tape because it revealed "his modus operandi."

  • March 21, 2024

    4 Things To Know About DOJ's Apple Antitrust Showdown

    As Apple prepares to fight state and federal prosecutors' monopoly claims filed Thursday, consumer advocates say it's high time allegations that the company stifles competition in the smartphone and app markets be taken to court, but Apple warns that a win for the government would harm its users.

  • March 21, 2024

    Cigna Slams Suit's Claims Of Algorithm-Led Coverage Denials

    Insurance giant Cigna Group wants a Connecticut federal court to toss a proposed class action alleging that an algorithm unlawfully rejected hundreds of thousands of claims en masse and without a proper review, arguing the suit is based on a "misleading" news article and shows a misunderstanding of the health insurer's claim denial process.

  • March 21, 2024

    AGs Urge Congress To Address Hemp Intoxicants In Farm Bill

    A bipartisan coalition of 21 attorneys general is urging Congress to address what the state officials call a public health and safety crisis by amending federal hemp policy to clarify that intoxicating products derived from hemp extracts are not legal under federal law.

  • March 21, 2024

    Ex-Conn. GOP Press Aide Can Pursue Claim Tied To Job Loss

    A former spokesperson for Republican lawmakers in the Connecticut House of Representatives can pursue an allegation of constructive discharge that the GOP office sought to have nixed from her discrimination lawsuit, a state court judge has ruled, finding that the plaintiff can claim an exception after failing to exhaust her administrative remedies.

  • March 21, 2024

    Conn. Judge Awards $59M Damages Payment In Crypto Feud

    A Connecticut state court judge has ordered an overseas business partner and his companies to pay $59.4 million to a bitcoin mining venture after he allegedly lied about both his criminal history and the legal woes of several other companies he controls while siphoning revenue and causing lost profits.

  • March 21, 2024

    DOJ Sues Apple, Rounds Out US Claims Against Tech Big 4

    The U.S. Department of Justice and several state attorneys general on Thursday launched an antitrust suit against Apple, accusing the world's dominant smartphone maker of maintaining an anti-competitive monopoly over its iron grip over the iPhone, rounding out the quartet of long-anticipated government antitrust litigation already proceeding against Google, Meta and Amazon.

  • March 20, 2024

    Bridge Repair Workers Get Partial Cert. In Conn. OT Suit

    A Connecticut federal judge has conditionally certified a boat captain's federal wage claims against a government subcontractor specializing in bridge projects, reasoning he sufficiently pled a violation of overtime pay policy, while declining to greenlight sub-collectives under New Jersey and Pennsylvania laws.

  • March 20, 2024

    2nd Circ. Revives Bias Suit Against Aramark

    A discrete discriminatory act within the statute of limitations against an employee can make a hostile work environment claim timely if an employee shows it's a part of ongoing discriminatory conduct, the Second Circuit ruled Wednesday, reviving a bias suit a female manager brought against food service giant Aramark Services Inc.

  • March 20, 2024

    Republican Bill Targets Colleges Hiring Unauthorized Workers

    Sen. J.D. Vance, R-Ohio, and Rep. Jim Banks, R-Ind., have introduced legislation to prevent universities that receive federal funding from hiring unauthorized immigrants.

  • March 20, 2024

    Conn. Panel Says Carveout Allows Cop To Fight Firing

    A fired Connecticut police sergeant and his union can pursue a court appeal in an effort to reinstate his job because the decision at issue is a final, appealable judgment under a carveout in the applicable law, the state appeals court has ruled.

  • March 20, 2024

    How The Supreme Court Could Narrow Chevron

    After hours of oral argument in a closely watched administrative law case, it appeared that some U.S. Supreme Court justices could be open to limiting the opportunities for lower courts to defer to federal agencies' legal interpretations in disputes over rulemaking — and legal experts said there are a number of ways they could do it.

  • March 20, 2024

    Breaking Down Each State's Climate Priority Policies

    Forty-five states have now completed climate action plans outlining how they'll advance federal climate goals through policy and programs in coming years, with most focusing at least in part on real estate development as a way to reduce emissions.

Expert Analysis

  • The Most-Read Legal Industry Law360 Guest Articles Of 2023

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    A range of legal industry topics drew readers' attention in Law360's Expert Analysis section this year, from associate retention strategies to ethical billing practices.

  • Inside Higher Education's New FCA Liability Challenges

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    As the educational sector expands its use of government funding, schools are at increased risk under the False Claims Act, but recent settlements offer valuable lessons about new theories of liability they may face and specific procedures to reduce their exposure, say James Zelenay and Jeremy Ochsenbein at Gibson Dunn.

  • Attorneys' Busiest Times Can Be Business Opportunities

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    Attorneys who resolve to grow their revenue and client base in 2024 should be careful not to abandon their goals when they get too busy with client work, because these periods of zero bandwidth can actually be a catalyst for future growth, says Amy Drysdale at Alchemy Consulting.

  • Reviewing 2023's Global AI Landscape Across Practice Areas

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    2023 stands out as a landmark year for artificial intelligence, both domestically and internationally, so legal professionals should brace for an increasingly complex future shaped by AI's integration into a multitude of sectors, including intellectual property, data privacy and cybersecurity, and ethics, say Fran Faircloth and May Yang at Ropes & Gray.

  • In The World Of Legal Ethics, 10 Trends To Note From 2023

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    Lucian Pera at Adams and Reese and Trisha Rich at Holland & Knight identify the top legal ethics trends from 2023 — including issues related to hot documents, artificial intelligence and cybersecurity — that lawyers should be aware of to put their best foot forward.

  • The Key Laws Retailers Should Pay Attention To In 2024

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    2024 promises to be another transformative year for retailers as they navigate the evolving regulatory landscape, particularly surrounding data privacy and sustainability laws, meaning companies should make it a practice to keep track of new legislation and invest in compliance efforts early on, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • How Attorneys Can Be More Efficient This Holiday Season

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    Attorneys should consider a few key tips to speed up their work during the holidays so they can join the festivities — from streamlining the document review process to creating similar folder structures, says Bennett Rawicki at Hilgers Graben.

  • A Former Bankruptcy Judge Talks 2023 High Court Rulings

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    In 2023, the U.S. Supreme Court issued four bankruptcy law opinions — an extraordinary number — and a close look at these cases signals that changes to the U.S. Bankruptcy Code will have to come from Congress, not the courts, says Phillip Shefferly at the University of Michigan Law School.

  • Series

    Children's Book Writing Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Becoming a children's book author has opened doors to incredible new experiences of which I barely dared to dream, but the process has also changed my life by serving as a reminder that strong writing, networking and public speaking skills are hugely beneficial to a legal career, says Shaunna Bailey at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Opinion

    What Happens If High Court Rejects Releases In Purdue Ch. 11

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    Reading the tea leaves following the U.S. Supreme Court's recent arguments in Harrington v. Purdue Pharma, it appears likely that the justices will decide that bankruptcy courts lack the power to release third-party claims against nondebtors, which would result in one of three scenarios, says Gregory Germain at Syracuse University.

  • Lessons From DOJ's Wave Of Labor Market Prosecutions

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    Attorneys at Patterson Belknap consider lessons learned and future meaningful challenges following the U.S. Department of Justice's first six criminal antitrust cases targeting employee no-poach and wage-fixing agreements, in which just one case resulted in a guilty plea.

  • How Clients May Use AI To Monitor Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Artificial intelligence tools will increasingly enable clients to monitor and evaluate their counsel’s activities, so attorneys must clearly define the terms of engagement and likewise take advantage of the efficiencies offered by AI, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

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    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

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    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

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