Commercial Litigation UK

  • April 24, 2024

    Fire And Rehire Justified By Equal Pay Threat, Tesco Argues

    Retail giant Tesco argued to the U.K. Supreme Court on Wednesday that its decision to "fire and rehire" warehouse workers on less favorable contracts was justified because keeping its promise of a "permanent" pay supplement could have exposed the company to equal pay claims worth millions of pounds.

  • April 24, 2024

    Fund Manager Denies Losing Jailed Politician's Wife £8M

    A fund manager has denied transferring €28 million ($30 million) from the account of an imprisoned Turkish politician's wife without her permission, claiming she gave written instructions to invest the money in emerging markets.

  • April 24, 2024

    Network Rail Rejected Pension Expert Due To Age Bias

    An employment tribunal has ruled that Network Rail discriminated against an applicant to the pensions team because he was in his mid-50s, saying that the manager processing submissions barely glanced at his curriculum vitae.

  • April 24, 2024

    Labcorp Prevails Over Software Biz TM Challenge In EU

    Labcorp has cleared its path to a trademark over its name in the European Union after a court ruled Wednesday that a German software business can't halt the application based on its earlier "labcore" signs that it has not sufficiently used in recent years.

  • April 24, 2024

    Boris Becker Settles With Creditors Over Missing Trophies

    Boris Becker's creditors have agreed not to chase the multiple Grand Slam tennis champion over the missing trophies he was accused of hiding to dodge paying debts, lawyers for the Wimbledon winner and bankruptcy trustees told a London court Wednesday.

  • April 24, 2024

    Panasonic Denies 'Illegitimate Pressure' In 4G Patent Fight

    Panasonic told a London court Wednesday that a bid by rival Xiaomi to have the Japanese giant's litigation accusing it of infringing standard essential wireless patents in other European courts thrown out is "dead in the water," saying its overseas claims against the company are legitimate.

  • April 24, 2024

    Keoghs Beats 'Rude' Job Candidate's Discrimination Claim

    An employment tribunal has thrown out a race discrimination claim against law firm Keoghs LLP, ruling that it did not treat a Greek national unfairly by rescinding a job offer for his "rude and uncooperative" behavior in an onboarding meeting.

  • April 24, 2024

    SFO Admits Deleting Osofsky's Phone Amid ENRC Leaks Row

    The Serious Fraud Office acknowledged on Wednesday that it "inappropriately" erased the mobile phone of its former director, Lisa Osofsky, during litigation over alleged leaks in what mining giant ENRC told a London court was a "flagrant breach" of its disclosure obligations.

  • April 24, 2024

    GXO Gets UK All-Clear For £762M Bid For Logistics Biz

    GXO Logistics Inc. said Wednesday that the U.K. government has granted national security clearance to its proposed £762 million ($950 million) takeover of British supply-chain group Wincanton PLC.

  • April 24, 2024

    Marine Tech Co. Fights MoD Unit's 'Inflated' $90M Claim

    A South Korean marine navigation business that misused a Ministry of Defence agency's data to make its own products has hit back at the agency's claim for as much as $90 million, alleging it includes jacked-up figures and miscalculations.

  • April 24, 2024

    AXA, Zurich Deny Liability In £26M Bakery Fire Claim

    A group of six insurers has denied that it unlawfully refused to pay out at least £26 million ($32 million) to cover damage and losses caused by a blaze at a bakery, saying the food business did not comply sufficiently with fire procedures to justify a payout.

  • April 24, 2024

    Law Firm Ordered To Repay Couple £194K For Loan Breach

    A court has ordered a law firm to reimburse a married couple at least £194,000 ($241,000) after finding that it had failed to adhere to the terms of two loan agreements the pair provided to help to fund its working capital and cover general business expenses.

  • April 24, 2024

    IP Firm Can't Take Bid To Block Clients' Case To Top Court

    Britain's highest court has rejected a final attempt by Marks & Clerk LLP to block thousands of former clients from bringing a bribery class action over alleged secret commission payments, ruling that the law firm did not put forward any arguable legal challenges that justified an appeal.

  • April 23, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Tech Exec Doubted 'Bizarre' $6M Deal, Jury Told

    Autonomy's ex-chief technology officer testified Tuesday in the California federal fraud trial of former CEO Michael Lynch that he had concerns about Autonomy's "bizarre" 2010 deal to sell $6 million in repackaged hardware, which prosecutors allege was never delivered and was only used to artificially inflate Autonomy's revenues.

  • April 23, 2024

    Post Office GC Felt 'Scapegoated' Over Horizon Review

    The Post Office's former general counsel felt "scapegoated" over the conclusions of an independent report she commissioned into the IT system used to prosecute hundreds of innocent people, she told the inquiry into the scandal Tuesday.

  • April 23, 2024

    Advertising Biz Can't Avoid Liability For Billboard Tech IP

    A London appeals court ruled Tuesday that a sports advertising company's digital billboard displays did not analyze pixels in a different enough way to overturn a finding that it infringed a rival's patent for the moving displays.

  • April 23, 2024

    Biotech Gets Rival's DNA-Detection Patents Invalidated

    A London court nixed two DNA sequence detection patents Tuesday, ruling that information available before they were protected would have prompted skilled scientists to make the invention eventually.

  • April 23, 2024

    Litigation Funders Face Risk Of Regulation In Judicial Reform

    England's judicial adviser announced Tuesday that it has launched a review into third-party civil litigation funding that will consider whether to regulate the sector, cap fees and investigate conflicts of interest between funders and litigants.

  • April 23, 2024

    UK Shuts Business For Fraudulent Timeshare Exit Claims

    The U.K. government said Tuesday that it has shut down an unregulated timeshare exit company after finding that it was "misleading hundreds of clients" by offering them help with complications in their timeshare contracts.

  • April 23, 2024

    YMCA Exec Loses Claim That In-Office Rule Forced Her Out

    A senior employee at a YMCA hostel has lost her claim that she was forced to quit because bosses would not let her permanently switch to remote working, after an employment tribunal ruled it wasn't in her contract.

  • April 23, 2024

    Tesco Can't Renege On Pay Pledges, Union Tells Top UK Court

    Retail giant Tesco violated workers' contracts when it "fired and rehired" them so it could remove what it described as a "permanent" pay supplement, a British trade union argued to the U.K. Supreme Court on Tuesday.

  • April 23, 2024

    Worker Wins £71K For 'Shocking And Spiteful' Harassment

    The Cardiff Employment Tribunal has awarded an aspiring police constable over £71,000 ($88,000), after his former colleagues launched a campaign of "shocking and spiteful" harassment to blackmail him into withdrawing his claims by sabotaging his policing career.

  • April 23, 2024

    Great Western Fights Worker's Whistleblowing Win On Appeal

    British train operator Great Western Railway fought to overturn a worker's whistleblowing win Tuesday, arguing that a tribunal wrongly concluded that managers launched an "inadequate and partial" misconduct probe against him because he had sued the company years before.

  • April 23, 2024

    Bank Of Ireland Used Deceit To Loan Millions, Investor Claims

    Bank of Ireland allegedly deceived a real estate investment business into borrowing millions from it by giving inflated property evaluations based on old estimates that were £1.2 million ($1.5 million) higher than up-to-date figures, according to a London court filing.

  • April 23, 2024

    UK Rules Sri Lanka Ship Insurance Row Must Be In London

    A U.K. judge ruled Tuesday that a Sri Lankan shipping company cannot sue a London-based insurer in its home country over liability for a sunken container ship because the insurance contract is governed by English law.

Expert Analysis

  • Accountability Is Key To Preventing Miscarriages Of Justice

    Author Photo

    The wrongful conviction of Andrew Malkinson and other recent cases show that in order to avoid future miscarriages of justice, there needs to be a fundamental reevaluation of how investigators, prosecutors and the Criminal Cases Review Commission operate, prioritizing stronger penalties and increased funding, say Thomas Walford at Expert Evidence International and policy analyst Gerald Frost.

  • UN Code Likely To Promote Good Arbitration Practices

    Author Photo

    The arbitrator code of conduct recently adopted by the United Nations Commission on International Trade Law should help reinforce standards of good practice and improve public perception of investor-state dispute settlement, though its effectiveness may be limited by the code's voluntary nature, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • 6 Key Factors For Successful Cross-Border Dispute Mediation

    Author Photo

    The European landscape of cross-border disputes diverges markedly from the U.S. experience and presents unique challenges, including the amalgamation of diverse cultures and legal systems, but there are several practical steps that practitioners can take to effectively navigate the process, says Peter Kamminga at JAMS.

  • EU Ruling Highlights Strategic Benefits Of Patent Appeals

    Author Photo

    The European Patent Office board of appeal recently reversed the examining board's ruling in an application by LG Electronics, highlighting how applicants struggling to escape conflicting objection traps at the examination level can improve their chances of a positive outcome with an appeal, says Andrew Rudhall at Haseltine Lake.

  • UK Tech Cases Warn Of Liability Clause Drafting Pitfalls

    Author Photo

    The recent U.K. High Court cases Drax Energy Solutions v. Wipro and EE v. Virgin Mobile Telecoms indicate a more literal judicial approach to construing limitations of liability, even when this significantly limits a claimant's recoverable damages, highlighting the importance of carefully drafted liability provisions, say Helen Armstrong and Tania Williams at RPC.

  • Series

    In A 'Barbie' World: Boosting IP Value With Publicity Machines

    Author Photo

    Mattel's history of intellectual property monitoring, including its recent challenge against Burberry over the "BRBY" trademark ahead of the "Barbie" film, shows how IP enforcement strategies can be used as publicity to increase brand value and inform potential collaborations, says Carly Duckett at Shepherd and Wedderburn.

  • EU Directive Implementation Facilitates Class Action Shift

    Author Photo

    Lawyers at Faegre Drinker discuss the increase in class and consumer action filings leading up to the implementation of the EU's Collective Redress Directive, and predict that certain aspects of the directive will result in a pro-claimant landscape that may mirror that of the U.S. and other common law countries.

  • Swiss Privacy Law Reforms Present Divergences From GDPR

    Author Photo

    The differences between Switzerland’s recently reformed Federal Act on Data Protection and the EU's General Data Protection Regulation, particularly around data breach reporting and the liability of company officers, will need to be carefully managed by multinationals that may have competing obligations under different laws, say Kim Roberts and Vanessa Alarcon Duvanel at King & Spalding.

  • EU Antitrust Rules Set To Pose Challenges To US Businesses

    Author Photo

    With stark differences between U.S. and European Union antitrust regimes, and potential for the forthcoming EU guidelines to turbocharge the commission's appetite for intervention, it is important that U.S. businesses with activities in the region take note of the reforms, say Andrea Pomana and Sarah Wilks at Mayer Brown.

  • Navigating The Rising Threat Of Greenwashing Enforcement

    Author Photo

    Recent high-profile cases before the Danish Consumer Ombudsman are a signal that authorities are ready to take robust action against greenwashing, and with a likely increase in the stringency of laws and severity of penalties, it is vital that businesses promoting their sustainable credentials do so in a compliant manner, says Lars Karnøe at Potter Clarkson.

  • New Legislation May Not Be Needed For Recovery Of Crypto

    Author Photo

    The recent seizure of cryptocurrency under a civil recovery order raises the issue of whether extended powers under the forthcoming Economic Crime Bill are necessary, with the ability to seize crypto-related items that may be the subject of a search order more likely to be of assistance, says Nicola McKinney at Quillon Law.

  • Opinion

    Russia Ruling Should Lead UK To Review Sanctions Policy

    Author Photo

    The High Court's recent dismissal of the first-ever court challenge to Russian sanctions in Shvidler v. Secretary of State sets a demanding standard for overturning designation decisions, highlighting the need for an independent review of the Russia sanctions regime, says Helen Taylor at Spotlight on Corruption.

  • UPC Revocation Actions Offer An Attractive Patent Strategy

    Author Photo

    As the Unified Patent Court gains momentum after an initial period of nervousness around the recently launched forum, more businesses may be starting to realize the value of running revocation actions as an alternative route to knocking out patents across Europe, say Oliver Laing and Georgia Carr at Potter Clarkson.

  • Pension Plan Amendment Power Lessons From BBC Ruling

    Author Photo

    The High Court's recent ruling in BBC v. BBC Pension Trust upheld an unusually restrictive fetter on the pension scheme's amendment power, which highlights how fetters can vary in degrees of protection and the importance of carefully considering any restriction, says Maxwell Ballad at Freeths.

  • 5 Takeaways For Litigants From Early EU Patent Court Ruling

    Author Photo

    One of the first Unified Patent Court ex parte preliminary injunctions was recently granted in myStromer v. Revolt Zycling, demonstrating the court's ability to decide cases extremely quickly, but parties should be careful in phrasing their motions and sufficiently substantiating them to achieve the desired result, says Antje Brambrink at Finnegan.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Commercial Litigation UK archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!