Colorado

  • March 06, 2024

    Judge Won't Revisit Contempt Order In Gold Mine Control Suit

    A Colorado federal judge refused Tuesday to reconsider or amend his 2022 contempt order sanctioning mineral exploration company DynaResource in a decade-old arbitration dispute over control of a Mexican gold mine, finding that DynaResource's arguments are untimely and "at best" tangentially related to the arbitration award.

  • March 05, 2024

    Colo. Judge Mulls Chevron Deference In Tricare Funding Fight

    A Colorado federal judge wondered Tuesday whether the U.S. Supreme Court's anticipated ruling on Chevron deference would affect a children's hospital's challenge to a Defense Department rule about healthcare reimbursements for military patients, asking the parties how she should rule while they wait for the Chevron decision.

  • March 05, 2024

    Trolling Web Forum Takes Copyright Feud To High Court

    An online forum notorious for supporting harassment is going to the U.S. Supreme Court with an argument that at least one court is wrong about what constitutes a notice of infringement, in efforts to shake off a copyright lawsuit from a self-published writer.

  • March 05, 2024

    Suncor Says Doubts About Colo. Monitoring Deal 'Misplaced'

    Suncor Energy has urged a Colorado state judge to approve its settlement with Colorado environmental regulators over emissions monitoring around its refinery near Denver, arguing environmental groups have raised vague and "misplaced" concerns about the deal but offered no concrete objections.

  • March 05, 2024

    Pot Co. Partner Questioned On Why $140M Award Was Unfair

    A Colorado appeals judge seemed to doubt that a trial court correctly threw out a $140 million arbitration award in a dispute between partners in a cannabis business, pressing the target of the tossed award to prove the arbitrator was so unfair that his decision should be erased.

  • March 05, 2024

    Netflix Says Service Isn't Taxable Tangible Property In Colo.

    Netflix's streaming video service is not tangible personal property subject to sales tax because the company does not sell objects to its subscribers, Netflix told a Colorado court in its case to force a refund of sales taxes paid.

  • March 04, 2024

    Justices Try To Shroud Differences With Trump DQ Ruling

    The U.S. Supreme Court issued a purportedly unanimous decision Monday finding states cannot bar federal candidates from appearing on ballots, but a closer look at the justices' writings — and the opinion's metadata — reveals a sharp divide that court watchers say was papered over in an effort to preserve the court's institutional legitimacy.

  • March 04, 2024

    Colo. Justices To Weigh If Weekends Extend Filing Deadlines

    The Colorado Supreme Court said Monday that it will hear arguments over whether the final day to file lawsuits under the state's three-year statute of limitations for car crash personal injury cases rolls to the next business day when it falls on a weekend or holiday.

  • March 04, 2024

    Stockholder In Homebuilder MDC Challenges $5B Acquisition

    A stockholder in homebuilder MDC Holdings Inc. accused the Denver-based company of agreeing to a $4.9 billion all-cash acquisition by a Japanese homebuilder only for the benefit of MDC's board.

  • March 04, 2024

    Legal Marketing Co. Sues Ex-VP Over Trade Secrets Theft

    Legal case acquisition marketing company Tort Experts LLC has sued a former senior vice president of marketing in Colorado federal court for allegedly sharing screenshots of the company's internal systems, pricing and margins with competitors in violation of an employment agreement and federal law.

  • March 04, 2024

    Colo. Justices Censure Ex-Judge, Order Him To Pay Fees

    A former state court judge has been censured by the Colorado Supreme Court and ordered to pay nearly $5,000 in legal costs to a disciplinary board that recommended he be reprimanded for exploiting his judicial position for the benefit of his brother-in-law after an alleged domestic violence incident.

  • March 04, 2024

    Justices Say States Can't Keep Trump Off Ballot

    The U.S. Supreme Court found that states can't bar Donald Trump from running for reelection this year based on a 14th Amendment provision, with justices on Monday reversing a Colorado high court decision that barred Trump from the state's primary election ballot.

  • March 04, 2024

    ​​​​​​​Veteran Federal Prosecutor Joins Crowell & Moring In Denver

    A former federal prosecutor with a history of handling cases in New York and Colorado has moved to Crowell & Moring to build a practice focused on government and internal white collar investigations, the firm announced on Monday.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gatos Silver Investors Get Initial OK On $21M Settlement

    A district judge granted preliminary approval to a $21 million settlement between a class of investors and precious metals producer Gatos Silver Inc. over allegations the company's Mexican operation fell short of expectations.

  • March 01, 2024

    Blockbuster Drug Sales Help Keep J&J Patent Alive

    Johnson & Johnson has persuaded a federal judge in Wilmington, Delaware, to rule in its favor in a patent case seeking to prevent a startup from launching a competing line of schizophrenia drugs, in part because Invega Sustenna has made the pharmaceutical giant billions of dollars.

  • March 01, 2024

    Cannabis Consulting Co. Says Clinic Owes $101K On Contract

    A laboratory and consulting firm that focuses on the cannabis industry alleged that a Michigan clinic owes the firm more than $100,000 for unpaid services, according to a lawsuit filed in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Judge Says Atty Depo Is Just 'Nature Of The Beast'

    The lawyer who helped a startup founder negotiate an acquisition deal with another company must sit for a deposition in the founder's suit alleging he was taken advantage of, a Colorado federal judge ruled, saying it was the "nature of the beast" for deals lawyers to sometimes get pulled into litigation.

  • March 01, 2024

    Energy Dept. Halts Crypto Mining Survey To End Industry Suit

    The crypto industry group challenging a U.S. Department of Energy survey on crypto mining has reached an agreement that will see the government offices destroy any data they've already collected and circulate the survey for comment from stakeholders — a step the crypto players say the government improperly bypassed the first time around.

  • March 01, 2024

    Tort Report: $42M Med Mal Award; Hot Coffee Suit In The Air

    A suit over hot coffee spilled at 40,000 feet and the affirmation of a $42 million medical malpractice verdict in Illinois lead Law360's Tort Report, which compiles recent personal injury and medical malpractice news that may have flown under the radar.

  • March 01, 2024

    Gov't Wants Spectrum Fraud Case Against Dish Dismissed

    The Justice Department has decided to intervene in a suit accusing Dish Network of using sham companies to buy spectrum from the Federal Communications Commission at a $3.3 billion discount, but not to take over litigation of the matter — it wants to end the whole thing.

  • March 01, 2024

    FTC Backs Colo. Right-To-Repair Expansion

    A Federal Trade Commission representative appeared at a Colorado legislative hearing in support of a proposed "right-to-repair" law requiring manufacturers to provide documentation, software, data and certain tools to allow consumers to fix their own digital electronic equipment.

  • March 01, 2024

    Colo. Real Estate Brokerage Settles Data Breach Class Claims

    A proposed class settled a data breach lawsuit against a Denver-based real estate brokerage and property management company in Colorado federal court.

  • March 01, 2024

    Trucking Co. Seeks Early Win In Colo. Drivers' OT Suit

    A trucking company has asked a Colorado federal judge to grant it a win in a group of drivers' lawsuit alleging unpaid overtime, arguing that the workers can't prove the statute of limitations should be extended to cover their claims.

  • February 29, 2024

    Veil Shouldn't Be Pierced To Decode Contracts, Panel Says

    The doctrine of piercing the corporate veil shouldn't be used to interpret disputed contract terms, a split Colorado appellate panel ruled Thursday, reversing a trial court's award of more than $600,000 in a real estate fight between two longtime friends.

  • February 29, 2024

    Colo. Panel Revives Wound Center's Damages Suit

    A Colorado state appellate panel Thursday revived a wound center's lawsuit against a rural healthcare district for payments related to its agreement with the district, finding in a published opinion that there were factual disputes a trial court failed to address in dismissing the wound center's breach of contract claims.

Expert Analysis

  • ABA's Money-Laundering Resolution Is A Balancing Act

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    While the American Bar Association’s recently passed resolution recognizes a lawyer's duty to discontinue representation that could facilitate money laundering and other fraudulent activity, it preserves, at least for now, the delicate balance of judicial, state-based regulation of the legal profession and the sanctity of the attorney-client relationship, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Law Firm Professional Development Steps To Thrive In AI Era

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    As generative artificial intelligence tools rapidly evolve, professional development leaders are instrumental in preparing law firms for the paradigm shifts ahead, and should consider three strategies to help empower legal talent with the skills required to succeed in an increasingly complex technological landscape, say Steve Gluckman and Anusia Gillespie at SkillBurst Interactive.

  • The Basics Of Being A Knowledge Management Attorney

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Michael Lehet at Ogletree Deakins discusses the role of knowledge management attorneys at law firms, the common tasks they perform and practical tips for lawyers who may be considering becoming one.

  • Perspectives

    'True Threat' Ruling May Ensnare Kids' Online Speech

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Counterman v. Colorado decision correctly held that a showing of intent is required to prosecute someone for true threats, but the amorphous standard adopted by the court risks overcriminalizing children’s use of social media and text-based communications, say Adam Pollet at Eversheds Sutherland and Suzanne La Pierre at Human Rights for Kids.

  • To Hire And Keep Top Talent, Think Beyond Compensation

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    Firms seeking to appeal to sophisticated clients and top-level partners should promote mentorship, ensure that attorneys from diverse backgrounds feel valued, and clarify policies about at-home work, says Patrick Moya at Quaero Group.

  • How Rate Exportation Is Shifting Amid Regulatory Trends

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    All banks and their partners, including fintechs, that wish to lend to borrowers in multiple states and charge uniform interest rates should heed regulatory developments across the country and determine how best to mitigate risks in their efforts to offer credit to consumers on a nationwide basis, say attorneys at Ballard Spahr.

  • Perspectives

    More States Should Join Effort To Close Legal Services Gap

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    Colorado is the most recent state to allow other types of legal providers, not just attorneys, to offer specific services in certain circumstances — and more states should rethink the century-old assumptions that shape our current regulatory rules, say Natalie Anne Knowlton and Janet Drobinske at the University of Denver.

  • Opinion

    10th Circ. Remand Of ERISA Claims To Insurer Is Problematic

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    The Tenth Circuit recently gave the defendant another bite at the apple in David P. v. United Healthcare by remanding Employee Retirement Income Security Act claims for reprocessing, but the statute lacks any provision authorizing remands of ERISA cases, says Mark DeBofsky at DeBofsky Law.

  • Identifying Trends And Tips In Litigation Financing Disclosure

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    Growing interest and controversy in litigation financing raise several salient concerns, but exploring recent compelled disclosure trends from courts around the country can help practitioners further their clients' interests, say Sean Callagy and Samuel Sokolsky at Arnold & Porter.

  • Why Employers Should Heed High Court Web Designer Ruling

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    While not an employment law ruling, the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in the First Amendment case 303 Creative v. Elenis raises serious questions for employers that constitute public accommodations and have related anti-discrimination policies, says Tanner Camp at Foley & Lardner.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Elrod On 'Jury Duty'

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    Though the mockumentary series “Jury Duty” features purposely outrageous characters, it offers a solemn lesson about the simple but brilliant design of the right to trial by jury, with an unwitting protagonist who even John Adams may have welcomed as an impartial foreperson, says Fifth Circuit Judge Jennifer Elrod.

  • 4 Business-Building Strategies For Introvert Attorneys

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Introverted lawyers can build client bases to rival their extroverted peers’ by adapting time-tested strategies for business development that can work for any personality — such as claiming a niche, networking for maximum impact, drawing on existing contacts and more, says Ronald Levine at Herrick Feinstein.

  • Barbie Deals Should Remind Brands Of IP Licensing Benefits

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    Mattel Inc.'s recent licensing of the Barbie trademark — one of the biggest licensing campaigns of recent history — illustrates that, as long as risks are managed properly, intellectual property licensing can form part of the overall business strategy and benefit both parties, say Maria Peyman and Anousha Vasantha at Birketts.

  • Opinion

    3 Ways Justices' Disclosure Defenses Miss The Ethical Point

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    The rule-bound interpretation of financial disclosures preferred by U.S. Supreme Court Justices Samuel Alito and Clarence Thomas — demonstrated in their respective statements defending their failure to disclose gifts from billionaires — show that they do not understand the ethical aspects of the public's concern, says Jim Moliterno at the Washington and Lee University School of Law.

  • What Courts' Deference Preference Can Mean For Sentencing

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent U.S. v. Vargas decision deepens the split among federal appeals courts on the level of deference afforded to commentary in the U.S. sentencing guidelines — an issue that has major real-life ramifications for defendants, and is likely bound for the U.S. Supreme Court, say Jennifer Freel and Michael Murtha at Jackson Walker.

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