Class Action

  • April 19, 2024

    Twitter Can't Sink Age Bias Suit Over Post-Musk Layoffs

    A California federal judge has refused to throw out a former Twitter employee's proposed class action alleging that a wave of layoffs following Elon Musk's acquisition of the social media platform now called X disproportionately pushed out older workers, saying the suit had enough detail to stay in court.

  • April 19, 2024

    Northshore Health Worker Drops Genetic Info Privacy Claims

    A patient sitter for Northwestern HealthSystem has voluntarily dropped her proposed class suit claiming she and other workers were unlawfully required to give up information about their medical histories during the application process.

  • April 18, 2024

    Citi Can Arbitrate Anti-Armenian Bias Suit, Judge Rules

    Citibank has won its bid to arbitrate proposed class claims that it discriminated against customers with Armenian surnames, as a Los Angeles federal judge found Wednesday that the plaintiff agreed to arbitrate allegations like these when she became a party to her Citibank card agreement.

  • April 18, 2024

    Satellite Broadband Co. Faces Investor Suit Over Project Delay

    Satellite manufacturer AST SpaceMobile Inc. was hit with an investor suit accusing it of concealing supply issues that prevented the timely launch of a satellite fleet intended to provide broadband services, leading to a 24% share price decline when the issues were eventually disclosed.

  • April 18, 2024

    NFL Can't Call Sunday Ticket Package A 'Luxury' At Trial

    The NFL cannot describe its Sunday Ticket broadcast package as a "luxury" in an upcoming trial over class action antitrust claims that the television bundle is anti-competitive, a California federal judge has ruled.

  • April 18, 2024

    Doximity Faces Investor Suit Over Slashed Revenue Hopes

    Medical professional networking service Doximity Inc., likened to "LinkedIn for doctors," and two of its executives are facing a proposed class action alleging it hurt investors by concealing slowing sales.

  • April 18, 2024

    Gov't Urges Redo Of Opt-Out Ruling In Camp Lejeune Suits

    The federal government has asked the North Carolina federal court overseeing the litigation over contaminated water at the Camp Lejeune base to rethink its decision from two months ago to allow some plaintiffs to opt out of discovery pre-trial.

  • April 18, 2024

    AGs, Google Defend $700M Play Store Deal Ripped By Judge

    A group of state attorneys general and Google defended the proposed $700 million settlement both sides brokered in the states' antitrust suit against the company in December, telling a San Francisco federal judge that the deal is consistent with Ninth Circuit precedent and releases only a limited set of claims against Google for a seven-year period.

  • April 18, 2024

    T-Mobile, Others Rip 'Hodgepodge' Forced Store Closings Suit

    T-Mobile says it doesn't belong in a suit accusing it and another company of misleading store owners by promising it would open hundreds of new stores in the wake of its $26 billion merger with Sprint in 2020 only to turn around and shut the plaintiffs down.

  • April 18, 2024

    Elevance Units Not Fiduciaries Of Union Plans, Court Told

    A lawsuit that two union healthcare funds brought against Elevance Health Inc. and several subsidiaries should be dismissed because it does not plausibly allege that fund money was overspent on medical care and administrative fees, and the defendants did not have fiduciary responsibilities, attorneys told a Connecticut federal judge on Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    BNP Paribas Can't Escape Suit Over Sudan's Rights Abuses

    A New York federal judge on Thursday largely denied BNP Paribas SA's request for an early win in a lawsuit accusing it of funding the former Sudan government's human rights violations, saying the Sudanese refugee plaintiffs have pointed to a "multitude of proofs" showing the bank's "conscious assistance" and knowledge of Sudan' genocidal acts.

  • April 18, 2024

    Jury Awards $98M To Wash. Healthcare Workers In Wage Suit

    A Seattle jury said Thursday a Washington-based healthcare system should pay thousands of its employees almost $100 million for its illegal timeclock rounding and meal break practices, an award that's expected to be doubled because a judge has already determined that the company's violations were willful.

  • April 18, 2024

    Qdoba To Pay $3.8M To Wrap Up Wash. Pay Transparency Suit

    Mexican restaurant chain Qdoba will pay $3.8 million to resolve a class action alleging it violated Washington state's pay transparency law when it failed to disclose pay information in job postings, according to a filing in state court.

  • April 18, 2024

    Coffee Bean Hit With ADA Suit Over Costly Milk Alternatives

    The Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf customers hit the coffee chain with a proposed class action Wednesday in California federal court, alleging it discriminates against people with lactose intolerance by requiring consumers to pay a surcharge for dairy-free alternatives.

  • April 18, 2024

    3rd Circ. Unclear If 'Session Replay' Web Code Directed At Pa.

    A Third Circuit panel seemed torn Thursday over whether websites like those of Papa John's or Mattress Firm "directed conduct" at Pennsylvania when they ran "session replay" software to track users' visits and whether that gave courts in the Keystone State jurisdiction over users' claims that such tracking violated laws against wiretapping.

  • April 18, 2024

    $550K Fingerprint BIPA Deal Receives Ill. Judge's Initial OK

    An Illinois federal judge gave his early blessing Wednesday to a nearly $550,000 settlement between global food supplier Rich Products Corp. and hundreds of current and former employees who claimed the company illegally collected and used their scanned fingerprint data.

  • April 18, 2024

    Bank Wants To Exit Suit Over $100M Of Special Needs Trusts

    American Momentum Bank has for the second time asked a Florida federal judge to let it get out of a lawsuit from the parents of a disabled child claiming it abetted a predatory scheme to misappropriate more than $100 million of special needs trust assets, saying the parents failed to show what role the bank played in the alleged misdeeds. 

  • April 18, 2024

    Retirees Seek $5.4M Counsel Fee In Talen Energy ERISA Suit

    Lawyers from three firms representing a class of retirees alleging Talen Energy unlawfully withheld early retirement benefits have asked a Pennsylvania federal judge to designate $5.4 million of the $20 million settlement as attorney fees.

  • April 18, 2024

    GM Hit With New Suit Over Transmission Defects

    A proposed class of car buyers has filed a new lawsuit alleging that General Motors LLC knowingly sold vehicles with defective transmissions, this one involving state law claims not included in a separate action that achieved class certification last year.

  • April 18, 2024

    Patient Data Breach Suit Should Be Tossed, Colo. Judge Says

    A judge has recommended that CommonSpirit Health be allowed to escape a proposed class action in Colorado federal court accusing it of failing to secure healthcare data leading to a breach affecting more than 600,000 patients, saying the complaint fails to "allege an injury-in-fact."

  • April 18, 2024

    Pomerantz To Rep Investors In AT&T Lead Cable Class Action

    A New Jersey federal judge approved Pomerantz LLP as the lead counsel for a proposed investor class action alleging AT&T lied about its effort to be environmentally conscious while contributing to the installation of toxic lead cables, with the New York City Public Pension Funds serving as lead plaintiff.

  • April 18, 2024

    Saladworks Operator Misclassified Asst. Managers, Suit Says

    A Pennsylvania-based franchisee of fast-casual salad eatery Saladworks misclassified its assistant managers as overtime-exempt even though they should have earned time-and-a-half wages for overtime hours, a former manager alleged in a proposed collective action filed in federal court Thursday.

  • April 18, 2024

    Shook Hardy Lands Bicoastal Trial Team From Carlton Fields

    Shook Hardy & Bacon LLP announced Thursday that it has brought on a highly experienced, four-attorney complex litigation team from Carlton Fields that is based in Los Angeles, Miami and Atlanta.

  • April 18, 2024

    Kellogg Beats ERISA Suit Over Use Of Outdated Data

    A Michigan federal judge tossed litigation accusing Kellogg of shortchanging married retirees by relying on outdated life expectancies and interest rates when calculating their pension payments, agreeing with the company that the Employee Retirement Income Security Act doesn't require the data used to be reasonable.

  • April 18, 2024

    Wife Of Alleged $3B TelexFree Scammer 'Hounded' In MDL

    The estranged wife of alleged TelexFree Ponzi schemer Carlos Wanzeler said Thursday that plaintiffs in a decade-old civil suit are needlessly "hounding" her for information they already have and urged a Massachusetts federal court to free her from the "litigation purgatory." 

Expert Analysis

  • Opinion

    Federal MDL Rule Benefits From Public Comments

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    The new Federal Rule of Civil Procedure concerning multidistrict litigation that was approved this week by the Advisory Committee on Civil Rules incorporates ideas from public comments that will aid both plaintiffs and defense attorneys — and if ultimately adopted, the rule should promote efficient, merits-driven MDL case management, say Robert Johnston and Gary Feldon at Hollingsworth.

  • Tips For Orgs Defending Against Daniel's Law Claims

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    With Daniel's Law recently amended to require courts to award statutorily defined damages to aggrieved parties, organizations should identify whether they are subject to the law and ensure they have implemented a comprehensive compliance program to better avoid litigation costs and reputational harm, say attorneys at Thompson Hine.

  • Practicing Law With Parkinson's Disease

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    This Parkinson’s Awareness Month, Adam Siegler at Greenberg Traurig discusses his experience working as a lawyer with Parkinson’s disease, sharing both lessons on how to cope with a diagnosis and advice for supporting colleagues who live with the disease.

  • Series

    Playing Hockey Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Nearly a lifetime of playing hockey taught me the importance of avoiding burnout in all aspects of life, and the game ultimately ended up providing me with the balance I needed to maintain success in my legal career, says John Riccione at Taft.

  • Opinion

    High Court Should Settle Circuit Split On Risk Disclosures

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    The U.S. Supreme Court should grant the petition for writ of certiorari in the Facebook case to resolve a growing circuit split concerning when risk disclosures can be misleading under federal securities laws, and its decision should align with the intent of Congress and the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission, says Richard Zelichov at DLA Piper.

  • For Lawyers, Pessimism Should Be A Job Skill, Not A Life Skill

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    A pessimistic mindset allows attorneys to be effective advocates for their clients, but it can come with serious costs for their personal well-being, so it’s crucial to exercise strategies that produce flexible optimism and connect lawyers with their core values, says Krista Larson at Stinson.

  • Intent-Based Theory Of Liability In Hwang Creates Ambiguity

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    A case against Archegos Capital founder Bill Hwang alleging that he participated in a securities manipulation scheme, which goes to trial next month in New York federal court, highlights the need for courts to clarify the legal standard defining "market manipulation," says Edward Imperatore at MoFo.

  • What NAR Settlement Means For Agent Commission Rates

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    If approved, a joint settlement agreement between the National Association of Realtors and a class of home sellers will likely take the onus off home sellers to compensate buyers' agents, affecting considerations for all parties to real estate transactions, say attorneys at Jones Foster.

  • Opinion

    New Mexico Fire Victims Deserve Justice From Federal Gov't

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    Two years after the largest fire in New Mexico's history — a disaster caused by the U.S. government's mismanagement of prescribed burns — the Federal Emergency Management Agency must remedy its grossly inadequate relief efforts and flawed legal interpretations that have left victims of the fire still waiting for justice, says former New Mexico Attorney General Hector Balderas.

  • Opinion

    Requiring Leave To File Amicus Briefs Is A Bad Idea

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    A proposal to amend the Federal Rules of Appellate Procedure that would require parties to get court permission before filing federal amicus briefs would eliminate the long-standing practice of consent filing and thereby make the process less open and democratic, says Lawrence Ebner at the Atlantic Legal Foundation and DRI Center.

  • 4 Ways To Motivate Junior Attorneys To Bring Their Best

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    As Gen Z and younger millennial attorneys increasingly express dissatisfaction with their work and head for the exits, the lawyers who manage them must understand and attend to their needs and priorities to boost engagement and increase retention, says Stacey Schwartz at Katten.

  • How American Airlines ESG Case Could Alter ERISA Liability

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    Spence v. American Airlines, a Texas federal case over the airline's selection of multiple investment funds in its retirement plan, threatens to upend the Employee Retirement Income Security Act's legal framework for fiduciary liability in the name of curtailing environmental, social and governance-related activities, say attorneys at Mayer Brown.

  • Series

    Serving As A Sheriff's Deputy Made Me A Better Lawyer

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    Skills developed during my work as a reserve deputy — where there was a need to always be prepared, decisive and articulate — transferred to my practice as an intellectual property litigator, and my experience taught me that clients often appreciate and relate to the desire to participate in extracurricular activities, says Michael Friedland at Friedland Cianfrani.

  • Former Minn. Chief Justice Instructs On Writing Better Briefs

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    Former Minnesota Supreme Court Chief Justice Lorie Gildea, now at Greenberg Traurig, offers strategies on writing more effective appellate briefs from her time on the bench.

  • Unpacking The Complicated Question Of CIPA's Applicability

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    As the number of California Invasion of Privacy Act cases increases, more and more companies with little-to-no California presence are being hauled into California court, raising questions of when CIPA applies and to whom, says Matthew Pearson at BakerHostetler.

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