California

  • April 16, 2024

    Netflix's Legal Head Departs, Says 'Mission Has Been Fulfilled'

    Netflix's well-known director of legal operations and technology, Jenn McCarron, has left the company after five years, according to a post shared on LinkedIn on Monday, with McCarron commenting that her "mission has been fulfilled" at the entertainment company.

  • April 16, 2024

    Businessman Urges Calif. Court To Refuse $4.4M Award

    A businessman who signed agreements with a Chinese energy management company on behalf of two different investment funds has told a California federal court that he never received proper notice about an arbitration that resulted in a $4.4 million award against him.

  • April 16, 2024

    Tribal Groups Want Full 9th Circ. To Rehear Oak Flat Appeal

    An Apache nonprofit is asking the Ninth Circuit's entire 29-judge panel to review its lawsuit that seeks to block a copper mining company from destroying a sacred Indigenous religious site, arguing that an en banc hearing is warranted given the appellate court's latest split decision on the land transfer.

  • April 16, 2024

    9th Circ. Upholds Tossing Skillz Gaming Tech Investor Suit

    The Ninth Circuit on Tuesday upheld a decision to toss a proposed class action claiming that mobile gaming company Skillz Inc. misled investors about its technology prior to a 2021 merger with a special purpose acquisition company, ruling that issues with the gaming software do not make the company' statements false or misleading.

  • April 16, 2024

    Fed. Circ. Is Told To Undo Transfer Of Apple Patent Case

    A Texas federal judge has shipped to California a suit accusing Apple of patent infringement, prompting patent-owning technology company Haptic Inc. to appeal the decision to the Federal Circuit.

  • April 16, 2024

    US Tequila Startup Defeats Older Mexican Rival's TM Case

    A Texas federal judge has decided that the tequila marketplace is big enough for both a U.S. startup called "Casa Azul" and an older Mexican brand called "Clase Azul," whose lawyers unsuccessfully tried to persuade the judge of its fame by playing a music video by reggaeton rapper Ozuna. 

  • April 16, 2024

    Tribes, Lawmakers Call On Biden To Protect Historic Sites

    A coalition of Native American tribal communities and federal lawmakers on Tuesday delivered a petition containing more than 800,000 signatures calling on the Biden administration to protect, expand and designate a slew of national monuments and sacred lands under the Antiquities Act.

  • April 16, 2024

    Buttigieg, State AGs To Probe Consumer Airline Complaints

    Transportation Secretary Pete Buttigieg on Tuesday announced a new partnership with Colorado and over a dozen other states to investigate consumer complaints about air travel, vowing to hold airlines and ticket agents accountable for excessive flight cancellations and unfair business practices.

  • April 16, 2024

    SEC Gets Partial Win In Muni Adviser Disclosure-Rule Suit

    A California federal judge has awarded a partial win to the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission in its suit alleging a municipal adviser and one of its principals engaged in unlawful advisory activities with four charter school clients, saying "undisputed evidence" shows the defendants acted as advisers without the proper registrations, among other things.

  • April 16, 2024

    9th Circ. Upholds $64M Award In Water Contamination Suit

    The Ninth Circuit upheld a $64 million award against a Parker Hannifin unit for cleanup costs tied to groundwater contamination in California's Santa Clarita Valley, and further held the district court erred in denying a finding of liability against the company.

  • April 16, 2024

    DraftKings Workers Say Ex-Boss Tried To Lure Them To Rival

    Two DraftKings higher-ups testified Tuesday that their former boss had tried to lure them to join rival sportsbook Fanatics with multimillion-dollar compensation offers, contradicting their former supervisor's claim that he never attempted to get his top lieutenants to help him set up a new office for Fanatics in Los Angeles.

  • April 16, 2024

    Zuckerberg Dodges Liability In Meta Addiction MDL, For Now

    A California federal judge has tossed certain fraud-by-omission claims seeking to hold Meta Platforms CEO Mark Zuckerberg personally liable in sprawling multidistrict litigation over social media platforms' allegedly addictive design, but she allowed the plaintiffs to amend their allegations to assert a new theory of corporate officer liability against Zuckerberg.

  • April 16, 2024

    Impossible Foods Slams 'Radical' TM Fight At High Court

    Impossible Foods has urged the U.S. Supreme Court to reject a request by a marketing firm owned by a self-described "digital nomad" to review a split Ninth Circuit decision reviving the veggie burger-maker's trademark lawsuit against it, arguing the petition mischaracterizes personal jurisdiction legal precedent and makes "radical" constitutional arguments.

  • April 16, 2024

    Media Watchdog Wants X Corp. Kept Out Of 'Privileged Affairs'

    A left-wing media watchdog wants X Corp. to keep its hands away from its donor lists, internal communications and other "privileged affairs" as a Texas federal court ponders the nonprofit's motion to dismiss, saying the social network has made "sweeping and harassing" discovery requests.

  • April 16, 2024

    Atty Fights $268K Sanction Over Fake Newspaper Filing

    A Seattle attorney ordered to pay $268,000 after being accused of filing a fake newspaper called the "The Saudi Sun" as a court exhibit wants the Ninth Circuit to overturn the sanction, arguing that it resulted from judicial misconduct and corruption.

  • April 16, 2024

    Capital One Escapes Customer Sign-Up Bonus Suit, For Now

    A California federal judge dismissed a proposed class action brought by a Capital One customer who claimed he applied for a credit card but never got a promised sign-up bonus, saying that a social media advertisement about a bonus was not enough to allege traceability.

  • April 16, 2024

    Seyfarth Lands 3 Morgan Lewis Employment Pros In Calif.

    A trio of labor and employment attorneys have moved from Morgan Lewis & Bockius LLP to Seyfarth Shaw LLP in California, the firm said Tuesday.

  • April 16, 2024

    Credit Union And 'Dreamers' Get Initial OK To Settle Bias Suit

    A California federal judge preliminarily approved a settlement offering cash to individuals who accused Alliant Credit Union of denying them loans for being asylum claimants, recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program or dependents of employment-based visa holders.

  • April 16, 2024

    Investors Say Cannabis Group Took $9.1M In Fraud Scheme

    Three investors are suing a California-based cannabis company and several affiliates, saying they were induced to invest more than $9.1 million in exchange for ownership shares of dispensaries, but have seen little to no return on their investment while their money was diverted.

  • April 16, 2024

    Cooley-Led Data Security Firm Rubrik Eyes $679M IPO

    Venture-backed data security firm Rubrik Inc. on Tuesday launched plans for an estimated $679 million initial public offering, hoping to capitalize on an upturn in technology listings.

  • April 15, 2024

    Ex-Autonomy Exec Testifies To Handshake Deals, Backdating

    Autonomy's former U.S. head of sales testified for the prosecution Monday in the criminal fraud trial of founder Michael Lynch, saying he boosted sales figures via "quid pro quo" handshake deals with customers, created pretextual emails to cover his tracks and even backdated a deal to meet revenue targets.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tax Attys, Broker Peddled 'Financial Fantasy,' NC Jury Told

    A North Carolina federal jury on Monday heard a series of secret recordings at the start of a tax fraud trial in which an insurance agent and a St. Louis attorney unwittingly pitched an undercover IRS agent on a way to decrease taxable income — or what the government characterized as a "financial fantasy."

  • April 15, 2024

    Gov't Says Mich. Court Lacks Authority Over U-Visa Delay Suit

    The federal government on Friday urged a Michigan federal court to toss a proposed class action alleging unreasonable decision delays in U-visa petitions, saying the court wouldn't be able to cure the visa-seeking plaintiffs' alleged harm of being unable to work.

  • April 15, 2024

    Calif. Cannabis Co. Stiiizy Sued Over Delta-8 Products

    California cannabis giant Stiiizy has been accused of selling products which were touted as federally compliant hemp wares but purportedly had high enough levels of psychoactive THC to qualify as marijuana products, according to a proposed class action in Illinois federal court.

  • April 15, 2024

    Tesla Workers' Atty Rips Claim Of Influence Over State Agency

    Counsel representing a putative class of roughly 6,000 Black Tesla workers alleging the automaker has allowed racism to run rampant at its California factory fired back during a class certification hearing Monday, calling Tesla's suggestion that plaintiffs counsel are driving the state's civil-rights litigation "beyond preposterous."

Expert Analysis

  • Examining The Arbitration Clause Landscape Amid Risks

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    Amid a new wave of mass arbitrations, recent developments in the courts and from the American Arbitration Association suggest that companies should improve arbitration clause drafting to protect themselves against big-ticket settlements and avoid major potential liability, say attorneys at Benesch.

  • How Activision Ruling Favors M&A Formalities Over Practice

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    The Delaware Chancery Court’s recent nod to a proposed class action, alleging shareholder notice violations in Activision Blizzard’s sale to Microsoft, puts practitioners on notice that customary merger and acquisition market practices do not offer protection from potential liability, say John Stigi and Eugene Choi at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Past CCPA Enforcement Sets Path For Compliance Efforts

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    The California Privacy Protection Agency and the California Attorney General's Office haven't skipped a beat in investigating potential noncompliance with the California Consumer Privacy Act, and six broad issues will continue to dominate the enforcement landscape and inform compliance strategy, say attorneys at Reed Smith.

  • Where 9th Circ. Lowe's Ruling Leaves PAGA Jurisprudence

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    Leah Kennedy and Carolyn Wheeler at Katz Banks discuss the legal landscape and controlling precedent around the Private Attorneys General Act that led to the Ninth Circuit's Johnson v. Lowe's decision last month on individual PAGA wage claims, and explore the open questions that it leaves.

  • Meta Data Scraping Case Has Lessons For Platforms, AI Cos.

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    The California federal court ruling that artificial intelligence company Bright Data's scraping of public data from Meta social media sites does not constitute a breach of contract signals that platforms should review their terms of service and AI companies could face broad implications for their training of algorithms, say attorneys at Arnold & Porter.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Is Imperative This Election Year

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    As the next election nears, the judges involved in the upcoming trials against former President Donald Trump increasingly face political pressures and threats of violence — revealing the urgent need to safeguard judicial independence and uphold the rule of law, says Benes Aldana at the National Judicial College.

  • Series

    Riding My Peloton Bike Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Using the Peloton platform for cycling, running, rowing and more taught me that fostering a mind-body connection will not only benefit you physically and emotionally, but also inspire stamina, focus, discipline and empathy in your legal career, says Christopher Ward at Polsinelli.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: March Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses four notable circuit court decisions on topics from consumer fraud to employment — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including coercive communications with putative class members and Article III standing at the class certification stage.

  • Compliance Steps After ABA White Collar Crime Conference

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    Senior law enforcement officials’ statements this month at the American Bar Association's white collar crime conference suggest government enforcement efforts this year will increasingly focus on whistleblower incentives, artificial intelligence and data protection, and companies will need to update their compliance programs accordingly, say attorneys at Baker McKenzie.

  • Cannabis Case Lights Up Benefits Of Creative IP Protection

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    A recently filed California federal court case, The Holding Company v. Pacific West Distributors, illustrates potential creative strategies cannabis companies can use to build intellectual property rights, such as combining federal and state registrations for copyrights and trademarks, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Spartan Arbitration Tactics Against Well-Funded Opponents

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    Like the ancient Spartans who held off a numerically superior Persian army at the Battle of Thermopylae, trial attorneys and clients faced with arbitration against an opponent with a bigger war chest can take a strategic approach to create a pass to victory, say Kostas Katsiris and Benjamin Argyle at Venable.

  • Md. May See Vigorous Resale Price Maintenance Enforcement

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    In Maryland, indications of a new focus on resale price maintenance agreements are significant because state prosecution in this area has been rare, particularly outside California, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • Infringement Policy Lessons From 4th Circ. Sony Music Ruling

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    The Fourth Circuit's recent decision in Sony Music v. Cox Communications, which in part held that the internet service provider was liable for contributing to music copyright infringement, highlights the importance of reasonable policies to terminate repeat infringers, and provides guidance for litigating claims of secondary liability, say Benjamin Marks and Alexandra Blankman at Weil.

  • What Recent Study Shows About AI's Promise For Legal Tasks

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    Amid both skepticism and excitement about the promise of generative artificial intelligence in legal contexts, the first randomized controlled trial studying its impact on basic lawyering tasks shows mixed but promising results, and underscores the need for attorneys to proactively engage with AI, says Daniel Schwarcz at University of Minnesota Law School.

  • For Now, Generative AI Is Risky For Class Action Counsel

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    Although a recent survey showed most in-house counsel think that their outside counsel should be using generative artificial intelligence "in some way" in class action work, the technology is more a target for class actions than it is a tool to be used in practice at present, says Matthew Allen at Carlton Fields.

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