Appellate

  • May 28, 2024

    Mich. Atty Can't Have Dominion Info, Pa. Court Told

    Dominion Voting Systems told a Pennsylvania state court Tuesday that information copied from election machines as part of a county's fraud probe was "fruit of the poisonous tree" and can't be shared with a Michigan attorney who has been in hot water for allegedly accessing other states' machine data and releasing the privileged information.

  • May 28, 2024

    Head Of Judicial 'Progressive Powerhouse' To Step Down

    Russ Feingold will step down next year as president of the American Constitution Society, which is a liberal counterpart to the Federalist Society.

  • May 28, 2024

    Tech Co. Says Houston Court Set Trial Despite Atty Vacations

    A Kansas-based technology company has asked a Texas appellate court to push back a June trial date in Houston, writing that a trial court judge scheduled the proceeding despite being notified of vacation conflicts by multiple attorneys.

  • May 28, 2024

    Edwards Urges Full Fed. Circ. To Limit FDA Safe Harbor

    Edwards Lifesciences has petitioned the full Federal Circuit to narrow its interpretation of a U.S. Food and Drug Administration safe harbor that essentially allows patent infringement during drug development, arguing that if Congress wanted the statute to be interpreted broadly, "it would have said exactly that."

  • May 28, 2024

    Ga. Law Firm Beats Sanctions Over Fatal Crash Mistrial

    The Georgia Court of Appeals has thrown out sanctions against an Atlanta civil litigation law firm requiring the firm to pay more than $584,000 in attorney fees and costs for not uncovering a purported conflict that caused a mistrial in a fatal crash lawsuit, finding the trial court's decision was excessive and not supported by evidence.

  • May 28, 2024

    High Court Urged To Review NY Rent Law Challenge

    Four interested third parties have urged the U.S. Supreme Court to review a suit challenging two 2019 changes to New York rental laws, arguing that high court intervention is needed to protect property rights across the country.

  • May 28, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Avenatti Appeal Of Nike Conviction

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to hear an appeal from Michael Avenatti challenging his conviction for trying to extort millions from Nike, with the high court's rejection ending the disbarred attorney's chances at overturning one of his three criminal convictions.

  • May 28, 2024

    Deutsche Bank Wins Conn. Appeal In Battle With Billionaire

    Deutsche Bank AG can continue to fight one prong of its sprawling, decade-long legal battle against billionaire Alexander Vik and his daughter as it seeks to satisfy a $243 million judgment rendered in the United Kingdom, the Connecticut Supreme Court ruled Tuesday.

  • May 28, 2024

    Gorsuch Unhappy Court Won't Rethink Jury Size Precedent

    In a strongly worded dissent Tuesday, Justice Neil Gorsuch said the U.S. Supreme Court needs to rethink precedent that "made the unthinkable a reality" by permitting juries of fewer than 12 people to decide cases involving serious criminal offenses.

  • May 28, 2024

    Fla. Health Co. Can't Nix Punitive Damages In Med Mal Suit

    A Florida appeals court won't strike a bid for punitive damages in a suit alleging an Orlando Health surgeon botched an appendectomy, saying there's sufficient evidence to justify the claim and that the hospital network is liable for the surgeon's hiring and retention.

  • May 28, 2024

    9th Circ. Won't Touch IRS Bid For Tax Liability On Bookie

    A bookie who pled guilty to helping run an illegal sports gambling ring out of Peru can't escape his ensuing $100,000 tax liability under a Ninth Circuit ruling that declined to expunge his conviction after he argued the taxes are disproportionately punishing.

  • May 28, 2024

    Justices Pass On Fight Over FERC Power Market Cap Rule

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a D.C. Circuit decision backing the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission's change of bidding practices for electricity capacity auctions run by PJM Interconnection, the nation's largest regional grid operator.

  • May 28, 2024

    High Court Won't Hear Case Over Fed. Circ.'s 1-Line Orders

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday shot down a bid for review from a businesswoman behind a small printing company challenging the Federal Circuit's practice of issuing one-sentence Rule 36 orders.

  • May 28, 2024

    High Court Won't Hear Pilot HOA's Rail Easement Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court has declined to hear a request from an Alaska homeowners association made up of pilots to review a Ninth Circuit decision giving a railroad control of an easement cutting into an airstrip for an airplane-centric subdivision.

  • May 28, 2024

    Justices Will Review EPA's 'Vague' SF Water Pollution Regs

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday agreed to review the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to set "vague" and "generic" pollution prohibitions for San Francisco, as opposed to numerical standards.

  • May 24, 2024

    Fla. Bar Seeks Longer Penalty Over Atty's Campaign Speech

    In a notice filed with the Florida Supreme Court on Wednesday, the Florida Bar said it would seek a 91-day suspension for Georgia-based attorney Christopher W. Crowley, rather than a recommended 60-day suspension after a referee said Crowley disparaged Amira Fox several times when both were running for 20th Judicial Circuit state attorney. 

  • May 24, 2024

    Apple Can't Wipe Out 2 Fintiv Mobile Wallet Patents At PTAB

    Apple wasn't able to persuade a panel of administrative patent judges to invalidate any language in a pair of patents issued to the founder of a failed cloud-based mobile financial services startup.

  • May 24, 2024

    GE Immune From Navy Member's Cancer Suit, 3rd Circ. Says

    The Third Circuit on Friday declined to revive a suit seeking to hold General Electric liable for failing to warn a deceased U.S. Navy veteran about asbestos risks at a government nuclear facility, ruling that derivative sovereign immunity bars the suit's claims.

  • May 24, 2024

    Red States Target Blue States In Push To End Climate Torts

    A novel red-state request that the U.S. Supreme Court nix climate change torts brought by state governments against fossil fuel companies can be seen as an attempt to urge the justices not to pass up another opportunity to weigh in on the issue, legal experts told Law360.

  • May 24, 2024

    11th Circ. Lets Carnival Passenger Pursue Pain Damages

    The Eleventh Circuit on Friday granted a Carnival Cruise passenger's bid for a new trial seeking damages stemming from her falling out of a wheelchair while disembarking a ship, agreeing that the movant's previous jury award for medical expenses is inadequate without a nominal award for pain and suffering.

  • May 24, 2024

    5th Circ. Clears Co. In Case That Sparked NLRB Remedy Shift

    The Fifth Circuit on Friday vacated a National Labor Relations Board order finding an ad software company violated federal labor law by laying off workers without bargaining with a union, but did not weigh in on the legality of the expanded remedies that the board used the case to adopt. 

  • May 24, 2024

    9th Circ. Says H-2A Employers Must Pay Highest Wages

    The Ninth Circuit on Friday said the U.S. Department of Labor can't let employers pay foreign farmworkers on H-2A visas a lower wage rate, rejecting the department's argument that the matter is moot because the previous harvest season is over.

  • May 24, 2024

    No-Show Plaintiff, 'Jackass' Atty Booted Too Fast, Court Says

    A Michigan appellate court sympathized with a trial court dealing with a no-show plaintiff and his lawyer who acted like a "jackass" — according to one appellate judge — but ruled Thursday that the trial court needed to do a better job documenting why it tossed the case instead of issuing a lesser sanction.

  • May 24, 2024

    Petition Watch: Forum Shopping, Monopolies & Gun Safety

    Law360 looks at four U.S. Supreme Court petitions filed in the past two weeks, including the FDA's request that the justices curb an increase in forum shopping at the Fifth Circuit, and two veterinarians who want the justices to allow plaintiffs to pursue antitrust claims for actions allegedly leading to the creation of a monopoly.

  • May 24, 2024

    Ohio Justices Say Regulator Must Take Freezing Death Case

    An Ohio trial court cannot hear a lawsuit seeking to hold Dominion Energy liable for a woman's freezing death after her natural gas was shut off, the state Supreme Court ruled Friday, reasoning the matter belongs before the state's utilities regulator because the shutoff was an act authorized by the utility.

Expert Analysis

  • 'Fat Leonard' Case Shows High Bar For Rescinding Guilty Plea

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    Prosecutors’ recent move in the “Fat Leonard” bribery case, supporting several defendants’ motions to withdraw their guilty pleas, is extremely unusual – and its contrast with other prosecutions demonstrates that the procedural safeguards at plea hearings are far from enough, says Sara Kropf at Kropf Moseley.

  • Justices Clarify FAA But Leave Behind Important Questions

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's decision last month in Bissonnette v. LePage firmly shuts the door on any argument that the Federal Arbitration Act's Section 1 exemption is limited to transportation workers whose employers transport goods on behalf of others, but two major issues remain unresolved, say Joshua Wesneski and Crystal Weeks at Weil.

  • Is The Digital Accessibility Storm Almost Over?

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    Though private businesses have faced a decadelong deluge of digital accessibility complaints in the absence of clear regulations or uniformity among the courts, attorneys at Epstein Becker address how recent federal courts’ pushback against serial Americans with Disabilities Act plaintiffs and the U.S. Department of Justice’s proposed government accessibility standards may presage a break in the downpour.

  • Rebuttal

    Double-Patenting Ruling Shows Terminal Disclaimers' Value

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    While a recent Law360 guest article seems to argue that the Federal Circuit’s Cellect decision last year robs patent owners of lawful patent term, the ruling actually identifies how terminal disclaimers are the solution to the problem of obviousness-type double patenting, say Jane Love and Robert Trenchard at Gibson Dunn.

  • Series

    Swimming Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Years of participation in swimming events, especially in the open water, have proven to be ideal preparation for appellate arguments in court — just as you must put your trust in the ocean when competing in a swim event, you must do the same with the judicial process, says John Kulewicz at Vorys.

  • How Courts Are Interpreting Fed. Circ. IPR Estoppel Ruling

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    In the year since the Federal Circuit’s Ironburg ruling, which clarified the scope of inter partes and post-grant review estoppel, district court decisions show that application of IPR or PGR estoppel may become a resource-intensive inquiry, say Whitney Meier Howard and Michelle Lavrichenko at Venable.

  • Mid-2024 FCA Enforcement And Litigation Trends To Watch

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    Reviewing notable False Claims Act trends and enforcement efforts in the last year and a half reveals that healthcare is a key enforcement priority for the U.S. Department of Justice, and the road ahead may bring clarification on Anti-Kickback Statute causation and willfulness standards, along with increased focus on private equity, cybersecurity and self-disclosure, say attorneys at Epstein Becker.

  • 2nd Circ. Eminent Domain Ruling Empowers Municipalities

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    The Second Circuit's recent decision in Brinkmann v. Town of Southold, finding that a pretextual taking does not violate the Fifth Amendment's takings clause, gives municipalities a powerful tool with which to block unwanted development projects, even in bad faith, say James O'Connor and Benjamin Sugarman at Phillips Lytle.

  • Opinion

    SEC Doesn't Have Legal Authority For Climate Disclosure Rule

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    Instead of making the required legal argument to establish its authority, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission's climate-related disclosure rule hides behind more than 1,000 references to materiality to give the appearance that its rule is legally defensible, says Bernard Sharfman at RealClearFoundation.

  • Breaking Down 4th Circ. Pendent Appellate Jurisdiction Ruling

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    As illustrated by the Fourth Circuit's recent decision in Elegant Massage v. State Farm, denying class certification and granting a motion to dismiss, federal appellate courts continue to struggle with defining the scope of pendent appellate jurisdiction — or jurisdiction over nonfinal orders below, says Joan Steinman at the Chicago-Kent College of Law.

  • What 100 Federal Cases Suggest About Changes To Chevron

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    With the U.S. Supreme Court poised to overturn or narrow its 40-year-old doctrine of Chevron deference, a review of 100 recent federal district court decisions confirm that changes to the Chevron framework will have broad ramifications — but the magnitude of the impact will depend on the details of the high court's ruling, say Kali Schellenberg and Jon Cochran at LeVan Stapleton.

  • Patent Damages Jury Verdicts Aren't Always End Of The Story

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    Recent outcomes demonstrate that patent damages jury verdicts are often challenged and are overturned approximately one-third of the time, and successful verdict challenges typically occur at the appellate level and concern patent validity and infringement, say James Donohue and Marie Sanyal at Charles River.

  • Justices' Title VII Ruling Requires Greater Employer Vigilance

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    The U.S. Supreme Court’s recent Muldrow v. St. Louis ruling expands the types of employment decisions that can be challenged under Title VII, so employers will need to carefully review decisions that affect a term, condition or privilege of employment, say attorneys at Morgan Lewis.

  • End Of Acquitted Conduct Sentencing Can Spark More Reform

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    The U.S. Sentencing Commission’s recent end to factoring acquitted conduct into federal sentences could signal the start of a more constitutionally sound advisory scheme, but Congress and the Supreme Court must first authorize the commission to resolve two constitutional errors baked into its guidelines, say Mark Allenbaugh at SentencingStats.com and Alan Ellis at the Law Offices of Alan Ellis.

  • NY Tax Talk: Primary Function Is Key Analysis For Sales Tax

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    Two sales tax cases recently decided by New York's Appellate Division illustrate why both taxpayers and the state's Department of Revenue subscribe to the primary function test, a logical way to determine whether business transactions are subject to sales tax, say Elizabeth Cha and Jeremy Gove at Eversheds Sutherland.

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