Aerospace & Defense

  • May 06, 2024

    13 Judges Boycott Columbia Clerks Over Protest Response

    A group of 13 federal judges told Columbia University's president Monday they won't hire students who attend the university or its law school as clerks, calling it an "incubator of bigotry" for its handling of student protests over the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, according to a copy of their letter that U.S. District Judge Alan Albright shared with Law360.

  • May 06, 2024

    Sikorsky's Forum Stance In Crash Suit Loses Teeth, Court Told

    A member of the Canadian Armed Forces has decided not to pursue "bystander claims" against Connecticut-based Sikorsky Aircraft Corp. and Lockheed Martin entities over a fatal helicopter crash off the coast of Greece, plaintiffs told a Pennsylvania federal court, noting that the development should pare down a forum dispute plaguing the matter. 

  • May 06, 2024

    US Army Looks To Dismiss Tribe's Repatriation Lawsuit

    The U.S. Army is seeking to dismiss efforts by a Native American tribe to repatriate the remains of two boys from one of the largest former Indian boarding schools in the country, arguing that it is "ready and willing" to assist to return them to their final resting places.

  • May 06, 2024

    Employer's Good Faith Axes Paystub Fine, Calif. Justices Rule

    The California Supreme Court on Monday held that if an employer had a good faith belief it was providing complete and accurate wage statements to its employees, it has not knowingly and intentionally violated state labor law, meaning workers cannot recover civil penalties offered for intentional violations of wage statement requirements.

  • May 06, 2024

    House Passes Bill To Prevent DOD Comms Breakdowns

    The House passed a bill by voice vote on Monday to prevent repeats of the communication lapse that occurred earlier this year when the secretary of defense was hospitalized and his deputy took over without the White House being informed.

  • May 06, 2024

    Navy Says Shipbuilder Premature On $150M Bad Faith Suit

    The U.S. Navy has urged the Court of Federal Claims to toss a $150 million suit alleging the Navy deliberately thwarted a shipbuilder's efforts to build a fleet of landing craft, saying the company failed to follow the proper procedure before suing.

  • May 06, 2024

    Claims Court Won't Toss Dispute Over Army Corps Work Redo

    A Court of Federal Claims judge on Monday refused to dismiss a lawsuit alleging the Army Corps of Engineers wrongly required a building construction contractor to redo its work, ruling the suit was not barred by a related previous case.

  • May 06, 2024

    Menendez Jury Can Hear Of Cash And Gold In Bribe Case

    A jury soon to weigh corruption charges against U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez can be told about cash and gold "stuffed in pockets, in a safe, in jackets" in the New Jersey Democrat's home despite his insistence that nothing ties the money to alleged bribes, a judge ruled Monday.

  • May 06, 2024

    Whiteford Hires Veteran National Security Atty In DC

    Whiteford Taylor & Preston LLP has hired a former Eastern District of Virginia assistant U.S. attorney, who has prosecuted high-ranking ISIS terrorists and a myriad of other criminals during his 18 years with the agency's national security and international crime unit.

  • May 03, 2024

    Boeing Can't Avoid Pre-Conception Toxic Birth Defect Claims

    A Washington state judge said Friday that the child of two Boeing factory workers can sue the aerospace giant for negligence based on harm he allegedly suffered before he was conceived, allowing him to accuse the company of failing to warn his parents about toxic chemicals they were exposed to on the job.

  • May 03, 2024

    GOP Sens. Warn Biden Against Accepting Gazan Refugees

    A group of 35 Republican U.S. senators warned President Joe Biden not to move forward with reported plans to accept refugees from Gaza, expressing doubts about being able to adequately vet individuals for terrorist ties to Hamas.

  • May 03, 2024

    Claims Court Trims Military Vax Mandate Class Action

    The U.S. Court of Federal Claims pared back a proposed class action seeking military back pay for service members allegedly discharged for not complying with a 2021 COVID-19 vaccination mandate, saying it had no jurisdiction over a nonmoney-mandating statute.

  • May 03, 2024

    Sens. Look To Add Kids Online Bills To FAA Bill

    A bipartisan group of senators is looking to add legislation to better protect kids online and on social media to the Federal Aviation Administration Reauthorization Act, which faces a May 10 deadline for enactment.

  • May 03, 2024

    Menendez Says Feds' Talk Of Psychiatrist Invaded Privacy

    U.S. Sen. Bob Menendez says prosecutors in his corruption case violated a New York federal court order and may have tainted the jury pool by allegedly revealing his sensitive private health information in a publicly filed motion opposing the New Jersey politician's request to introduce expert testimony by a psychiatrist.

  • May 02, 2024

    Boeing Supplier Sues Texas AG To Block Safety Investigation

    The subsidiary of a company that produces fuselages for Boeing's 737 jets sued on Wednesday to block the Texas attorney general's investigation into apparent manufacturing issues that have caused recent midair emergencies, saying the probe is unconstitutional and violates the company's right to be free from unreasonable searches.

  • May 02, 2024

    Gov't Proposes Buy Ban Rule For Certain Semiconductors

    The Federal Acquisition Regulatory Council said Thursday it is planning to implement a ban on federal purchases of semiconductor products from U.S. adversaries, asking for feedback from contractors on how prescriptive the pending rule should be.

  • May 02, 2024

    Ethics, Military Orgs. Back Review Of Judge's Non-Recusal

    An ethics institute at the University of Pennsylvania and a military justice organization told the U.S. Supreme Court on Thursday that a D.C. Circuit judge deprived a former al-Qaida member of a fair hearing when the judge did not recuse himself from the Guantanamo detainee's appeal.

  • May 02, 2024

    Abu Ghraib Contractor Torture Liability Case Ends In Mistrial

    A Virginia federal judge on Thursday declared a mistrial in a suit accusing military contractor CACI International of aiding and abetting torture at the Abu Ghraib military prison in Iraq, after the jury deadlocked following extensive deliberations.

  • May 02, 2024

    Camp Lejeune Litigants Ask Court Who Can Represent Family

    Family members of former residents of Camp Lejeune who died, allegedly after being exposed to contaminated drinking water, asked the North Carolina federal court overseeing the litigation on Wednesday to clarify who can qualify to act as a legal representative for out-of-state decedents.

  • May 02, 2024

    Pharma. Co. Wants Ex-Director To Stop Poaching Customers

    A pharmaceutical company has doubled down on its bid to stop a former director from soliciting customers for a rival drugmaker, saying he's trying to twist words in his contract and make up excuses for allegedly stealing trade secrets following his termination.

  • May 02, 2024

    5th Circ. Pauses NLRB Suit Against SpaceX Amid New Appeal

    A Fifth Circuit panel on Thursday paused an ongoing National Labor Relations Board suit against SpaceX to consider the company's challenge to what it calls the "effective" denial of its bid to block a suit by an agency it claims is unconstitutional.

  • May 02, 2024

    New EU, Japan Initiative Looks To Boost Global Supply Chains

    Japan and the European Union on Thursday announced a new initiative aimed at alleviating the economic dependence countries may have on others for certain goods by boosting global supply chains through transparency and coordination with like-minded countries.

  • May 02, 2024

    Cisco Counterfeiting Scheme Earns Fla. Man 6½ Years

    A Florida resident was sentenced to 6½ years in prison after pleading guilty to running what New Jersey federal prosecutors said was an "enormous" scheme to sell over $1 billion worth of counterfeit and broken Cisco networking devices.

  • May 02, 2024

    US Wants To Forfeit $1.55M Landing Gear Bound For Russia

    The U.S. Department of Justice has filed a forfeiture action against a $1.55 million set of aircraft landing gear for a Boeing 737-800 that the government confiscated in Miami and says was purchased for a Kyrgyz Republic-based company servicing the Russian government in violation of U.S. economic sanctions.

  • May 02, 2024

    HMRC Asked To Investigate Firm On Dodging Sanctions

    HM Revenue & Customs should investigate a German-owned garage door manufacturer for violating sanctions by importing products from Belarus into the U.K., but instead authorities brushed off the case and now the company might receive a license, a U.K. lawmaker said.

Expert Analysis

  • 7 Common Myths About Lateral Partner Moves

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    As lateral recruiting remains a key factor for law firm growth, partners considering a lateral move should be aware of a few commonly held myths — some of which contain a kernel of truth, and some of which are flat out wrong, says Dave Maurer at Major Lindsey.

  • Series

    Cheering In The NFL Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Balancing my time between a BigLaw career and my role as an NFL cheerleader has taught me that pursuing your passions outside of work is not a distraction, but rather an opportunity to harness important skills that can positively affect how you approach work and view success in your career, says Rachel Schuster at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Unpacking The New Russia Sanctions And Export Controls

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    Although geographically broad new prohibitions the U.S., U.K. and EU issued last week are somewhat underwhelming in their efforts to target third-country facilitators of Russia sanctions evasion, companies with exposure to noncompliant jurisdictions should pay close attention to their potential impacts, say attorneys at Shearman.

  • Args In APA Case Amplify Justices' Focus On Agency Power

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    In arguments last week in Corner Post v. Federal Reserve, the U.S. Supreme Court justices paid particular importance to the possible ripple effects of their decision, which will address when a facial challenge to long-standing federal rules under the Administrative Procedure Act first accrues and could thus unleash a flood of new lawsuits, say attorneys at Snell & Wilmer.

  • Series

    ESG Around The World: Gulf Cooperation Council

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    The Gulf Cooperation Council is in the early stages of ESG policy implementation, but recent commitments by both states and corporations — including increases in sustainable finance transactions, environmental commitments, female representation on boards and human rights enforcement — show continuing progress toward broader ESG goals, say attorneys at Cleary.

  • Steps For Companies New To Sanctions Compliance

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    Businesses newly required to implement compliance programs due to the increased breadth of mandatory sanctions and export controls, including 500 additional Russia sanctions announced last Friday, should closely follow the guidance issued by the Office of Foreign Assets Control and other regulators, say Jennifer Schubert and Megan Church at MoloLamken.

  • Contract Disputes Recap: The Terms Matter

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    Stephanie Magnell and Zachary Jacobson at Seyfarth examine recent decisions from the U.S. Civilian Board of Contract Appeals, the Armed Services Board of Contract Appeals and the U.S. Court of Federal Claims, which offer reminders about the importance of including contract terms to address the unexpected circumstances that may interfere with performance.

  • 6 Pointers For Attys To Build Trust, Credibility On Social Media

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    In an era of information overload, attorneys can use social media strategically — from making infographics to leveraging targeted advertising — to cut through the noise and establish a reputation among current and potential clients, says Marly Broudie at SocialEyes Communications.

  • Class Actions At The Circuit Courts: February Lessons

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    In this month's review of class action appeals, Mitchell Engel at Shook Hardy discusses five notable circuit court decisions on topics from property taxes to veteran's rights — and provides key takeaways for counsel on issues including class representative intervention, wage-and-hour dispute evidence and ascertainability requirements.

  • A Post-Mortem Analysis Of Stroock's Demise

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    After the dissolution of 147-year-old firm Stroock late last year shook up the legal world, a post-mortem analysis of the data reveals a long list of warning signs preceding the firm’s collapse — and provides some insight into how other firms might avoid the same disastrous fate, says Craig Savitzky at Leopard Solutions.

  • How DOD Can Improve Flexibility Under Proposed Cyber Rule

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    The U.S. Department of Defense should carefully address some of the more nuanced aspects of the Cybersecurity Maturity Model Certification program to avoid unintended consequences, specifically the proposal to severely limit contractor use of plans of actions and milestones, say Joshua Duvall at Maynard Nexsen and Sandeep Kathuria at L3Harris Technologies.

  • Fed. Circ. Ruling Helps Clarify When Gov't Clawback Is Timely

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    The Federal Circuit’s examination of claims accrual in a January decision that allows the Defense Contract Management Agency to pursue overpayment claims under a cost-reimbursement contract serves as a reminder that the government can lose such claims by waiting too long to file, say Evan Sherwood and Peter Hutt at Covington.

  • 6th Circ. Ruling Breathes New Life Into Article III Traceability

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    The Sixth Circuit's recent decision in Hardwick v. 3M Co. to vacate a district court's certification of one of the largest class actions in American jurisprudence for lack of Article III standing has potentially broader implications for class action practice in the product liability sphere, particularly in medical monitoring cases involving far-fetched theories of causation, say attorneys at Skadden.

  • Aviation Watch: 737 Max Blowout Raises Major Safety Issues

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    The sudden in-flight loss of a side panel on an Alaska Air 737-9 Max last month, leaving a gaping hole in the side of the plane's cabin, highlighted ongoing quality issues at Boeing, the jet's manufacturer — but the failure also arose from decisions made by the airline, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Exporters Should Approach Self-Disclosure With Caution

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    A January Bureau of Industry and Security memorandum created an abbreviated process for disclosing export control violations that lack aggravating factors, but deciding which disclosure method to utilize remains a complex strategic undertaking to which companies must give careful consideration, say attorneys at Covington.

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